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⫸STICKY⫷ PD Social Distancing Tripping Thread: Viruses Can't Penetrate Hyperspace

Xorkoth

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Exactly, I too am a little disappointed
I don't see it as nerdy though, more like tasteless hahah, it got big on Facebook and was being commented on all sorts of terrible memes and videos, the association never left me. Emoji culture might be different across continents, but in Europe cool ( =D ) people will never use it unironically

I think that's why for me too. Like every time I see people posting dumb videos and posts on social media with 3 of those teary-eyed laughing emojis I think "fucking tool". I can't help it, I'm sure they're not all tools.
 

Buzz Lightbeer

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I think that's why for me too. Like every time I see people posting dumb videos and posts on social media with 3 of those teary-eyed laughing emojis I think "fucking tool". I can't help it, I'm sure they're not all tools.
Very true, unlikely they are indeed all tools, but it's social media, so it's all about image and not as much about 'being'. So with some extended logic, looking like one, is essentially being one.

I might have other unresolved issues with an emoji or two, too, but it's probably best, image-wise that is, not to get into that
 

Cream Gravy?

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I think that's why for me too. Like every time I see people posting dumb videos and posts on social media with 3 of those teary-eyed laughing emojis I think "fucking tool". I can't help it, I'm sure they're not all tools.
I do too to be quite frank lol
 

Buzz Lightbeer

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Damn, I failed :(

When it comes to overtly designating things as 'funny' I'm a simple man, I like a haha/hahah/variations on haha. I really like lol too, specifically non capitalized, fits in a lot of places, doesn't jump out too much, kinda brings a flow to consecutive statements and specifically indicates that the tone isn't serious. I'm also not averse to stronger ones like lmao, though ROFLs and ROFLMAOs might be a little too much lol. Sadly my favorite emoji isn't included in this software, I will be making a request!
But I mostly like it best dry, left up to interpretation and maybe even imagination, who knows, or........ who cares......Never stops me from giving my opinion either way!
 

w01fg4ng

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A well placed heart emoji can go a long way but don't put too much equity into it.

An "I love you" can deliver the message at break neck speeds, but for lightening responses you can always go for the emotional sincerity of the truth.

It's time I trip again, I can feel it.
 

perpetualdawn

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I really like lol too, specifically non capitalized, fits in a lot of places, doesn't jump out too much, kinda brings a flow to consecutive statements and specifically indicates that the tone isn't serious.
I like a good lol too, but sometimes it comes off unintentionally disparaging, because it has gradually become more and more used in a condescending way. you know like, lol ok.

I like leaving it pretty dry too, but sometimes people don't detect sarcasm very well.

I noticed that sarcasm is pretty cultural. Some cultures really don't do sarcasm at all.
 

Buzz Lightbeer

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That is indeed a regrettable evolution in the use of lol.
Which cultures are you talking about? No need to get too deep into this lol, I'm just wondering. As I think that in general it mostly comes down to the person, and while some cultures or countries might be less funny for example, I don't think their average would be that far off world average, if you'd find a way of rating e.g. humor (imagine). Language barriers are probably the biggest obstacle when it comes to sarcasm and irony.
 

perpetualdawn

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I found in Brazil, at least in the city/circle I was in, sarcasm was almost nonexistent. Less extremely, within the english speaking world, the USA seems to be a lot less sarcastic than the UK. Although that might be just the west coast USA, I can imagine a lot of sarcasm in NY for example.

Yeah, it's very likely down to a narrow observation from one persons viewpoint, but it's human nature to try to detect patterns isn't it (lol).
 

Xorkoth

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English is a language full of wordplay and humor, and sarcasm fits like a glove. I have also found that in the UK they use sarcasm even moreso than in the US, but there is a lot of sarcasm in the US. It seems like some languages are not set up for it as much, or perhaps it just hasn't evolved as an understood form of communication. I have found that foreign people often don't understand sarcasm until they have some experience communicating with native English speakers.
 

Img_9999

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I would expect that last bit. Sarcasm has a lot to do with context and tone, and it takes a lot of familiarity with a language to discern that kind of nuance. Tone specially, it is kinda like learning to differentiate accents in a foreign language, takes a lot of familiarity beyond learning to speak it.

I've also found some cultures have more sarcasm than others. Chile uses a lot more sarcasm than, say, Perú or Bolivia. I think Argentinians also have a sarcastic, but different kind of humor. But then yeah, humor itself is highly contextual too. I remember when I did my work related trip to the USA the lab I was working in had mostly Chinese PhD students. One of them told me that one of the biggest cultural barriers for them was that they did not get north-american humor. They were unable to catch sarcasm of playfully silly remarks. She said that Chinese humor was completely different, mostly based on word-play.


Hi everyone <3
 

perpetualdawn

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I've noticed that French is particularly full of homonyms. I don't know the language very well, and definitely haven't gotten to the point where I can pick up on the jokes, but I imagine there must be a ton of word-play humour in french. Any French speakers on here who can verify?
 

blistersinthedark

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I've noticed that French is particularly full of homonyms. I don't know the language very well, and definitely haven't gotten to the point where I can pick up on the jokes, but I imagine there must be a ton of word-play humour in french. Any French speakers on here who can verify?
Yes, puns are a scourge of the French language.
 

perpetualdawn

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Another funny thing we do is use descriptors that have the opposite literal meaning to how they are intended. For example: "sick", "the shit", "wicked". This isn't sarcasm or irony, I don't know what you call it. I remember trying to explain this to some of my Brazilian friends and it made no sense to them. Why would you say something is sick when it's good? I don't think they really do this in Brazilian Portuguese, although they do have some slang words that can have opposite meanings depending on their context. Like "caralho". Bom pra caralho!
 

Xorkoth

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Another funny thing we do is use descriptors that have the opposite literal meaning to how they are intended. For example: "sick", "the shit", "wicked". This isn't sarcasm or irony, I don't know what you call it. I remember trying to explain this to some of my Brazilian friends and it made no sense to them. Why would you say something is sick when it's good? I don't think they really do this in Brazilian Portuguese, although they do have some slang words that can have opposite meanings depending on their context. Like "caralho". Bom pra caralho!

I was talking about this recently with my friend. English is so funny, the way we use slang must be so incomprehensible to people who are trying to learn it. We do use a lot of opposite-meaning things, and I don't know why. But it's not universal. Like for example, you can call something "cold" and it generally means either that a person is standoffish/frigid (haha there's another) or like "that was harsh", but calling someone "cool" means something totally different. Or, you can literally mean that something is low temperature. And yeah, "sick", "ill", etc, mean roughly, "awesome", but if you called someone "diseased" it would not mean that at all... unless in the context of the conversation it was clear you were playing on the "sick" theme. There is a lot that relies on context clues.

I love English because you can invent your own version of it, make up new words on the spot, and people will get it if you're clever, in fact you can even explain something more intimately that way sometimes. And the opportunities for humor are everywhere.
 
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