• MDMA &
    Empathogenic
    Drugs

    Welcome Guest!
  • MDMA Moderators: andyturbo | BlueBull | scatterday
  • Bluelight HOT THREADS
  • Let's Welcome Our NEW MEMBERS!

MDMA Recovery (Stories & Support - 7) [ALL LTC posts go here]

Cloudshark

Greenlighter
Joined
Apr 20, 2021
Messages
1
Have you ever encountered any physical changes due to MDMA use / withdrawal ?

I'm asking about face especially. I've been trying to quit MDMA but within a period of few months my body and face changed so badly I was afraid I'm going to do some permanent damage to myself. Then I did mdma again and almost everything went back to "normal". But basically I feel as if my "normal" pre-mdma version was gone! I wonder if I was just unable to go past recovery? Or am I dead and gone by now.

Funny fact is that I also know 1 girl with similiar problem but she wouldn't admit. Yet I see that she has periods when she looks like shit and then she boosts herself with MDMA and becomes beautiful (or so does it seem). Other girl, which I know was also using, went unreachable for about 7 months for no reason and now she looks different, much worse actually, but quite "normal".

I'm wondering if there is any easy way to quit out of this. Is it safer to just lower the doses and lenghten the periods when I use? So far I've noticed that cutting usage (especially after often overdosing) is not the greatest idea.

I've been using for 2,5 years. Usually between 400 - 600 mg per 2 weeks (sometimes per week). I also had few breaks of 2-3 months in between so basically constant usage is less than 2 years.


BTW: Do you know what kind of muscle relaxants are safe during MDMA withdrawal? My muscles tend to stiffen during those periods and I wonder if I could ask my neurologist to prescribe me anything.
 

nnzo

Bluelighter
Joined
Nov 10, 2014
Messages
50
Has anyone got nerve damage from
This LTC ?
It’s my last symptom and it’s persisted - aching body every upper torso when I press down on my skin …? Anyone I’ve been struggling for 7 years
 

andman1326

Greenlighter
Joined
Jan 7, 2021
Messages
18
9 months in and completely recovered.

Unlike before, I never come back here. Back in January it was almost a compulsion to read every little post.
Anyway, for future folks that stumble on this, read my posts so you can get an idea of what a 6-9 month recovery may look like.

Exercise, sleep, and time.
If you're really struggling don't be afraid to try SSRIs to hold you over. Inhousepharmacy has them without a script.
seroquel (quetiapine) can also help if you have sleep issues. Can get without a script on most overseas pharmacies.

Good luck!
 

Rapidone

Greenlighter
Joined
Aug 16, 2021
Messages
5
9 months in and completely recovered.

Unlike before, I never come back here. Back in January it was almost a compulsion to read every little post.
Anyway, for future folks that stumble on this, read my posts so you can get an idea of what a 6-9 month recovery may look like.

Exercise, sleep, and time.
If you're really struggling don't be afraid to try SSRIs to hold you over. Inhousepharmacy has them without a script.
seroquel (quetiapine) can also help if you have sleep issues. Can get without a script on most overseas pharmacies.

Good luck!
Hi Andman, thanks for sharing! Did you have any muscle twitching or parasthesia symptoms?
 

andman1326

Greenlighter
Joined
Jan 7, 2021
Messages
18
Hi Andman, thanks for sharing! Did you have any muscle twitching or parasthesia symptoms?
Yes, the first week or two I was restless, twitching while laying in bed. When I was by myself I paced back and forth throughout my house, restlessly, couldn't stand or sit still.

First 2-3 days I couldn't even sleep with the aid of lorazepam and other heavy sedatives. Completely lost sex drive and appetite, lost about 20 pounds but those came back 1.5-2 weeks in.

Very seldom if things are completely quiet I can make out a little tinnitus bus even that's faded away mostly. So I can say a complete recovery can happen for most given time.
 

Rapidone

Greenlighter
Joined
Aug 16, 2021
Messages
5
Yes, the first week or two I was restless, twitching while laying in bed. When I was by myself I paced back and forth throughout my house, restlessly, couldn't stand or sit still.

First 2-3 days I couldn't even sleep with the aid of lorazepam and other heavy sedatives. Completely lost sex drive and appetite, lost about 20 pounds but those came back 1.5-2 weeks in.

Very seldom if things are completely quiet I can make out a little tinnitus bus even that's faded away mostly. So I can say a complete recovery can happen for most given time.
Thank you for coming back to share this, you made a good thing. Means a lot and be happy out there!
 

Matt5280

Greenlighter
Joined
Sep 19, 2019
Messages
8
Hey guys just wanted to give an update. It’s been over 2 years since my ordeal with mdma first occurred. I recovered a good bit by just allowing my mind and body to naturally heal but I recently decided to get on 10mg of Lexapro to help with lasting effects of anxiety, depression and brain fog. I can honestly say that I am now anxiety, depression and brain fog free. I feel like myself again and I’m actually more at ease in social situations than I was before my LTC ever happened. Trust me I know how bad it is to go through this and it honestly amazes me how well I’m doing today compared to when all this first started. Just hang in there and don’t give up!
 

andman1326

Greenlighter
Joined
Jan 7, 2021
Messages
18
Thank you for coming back to share this, you made a good thing. Means a lot and be happy out there!
No problem.

Also remember that I'm 36, going on 37, so not exactly young. I mention that for the older folks that they can still make a good recovery.
 

longlongtermcd

Greenlighter
Joined
Oct 7, 2021
Messages
6
my long term comedown started on 1st of april 2016

i don't feel i've recovered at all. just the same extreme lack of emotions and lack of giving a shit or being absorbed in anything. anyone else in this boat? cannabis used to bring emotions somewhat back but that's largely lost effect - i'll be high af and my perceptions/thoughts will be all stoned but i'll still be like, wow i feel absolutely almost nothing.

anyone else relate? it's been 5 years of this hell.
 
Last edited:

semisober

Greenlighter
Joined
Oct 14, 2020
Messages
11
my long term comedown started on 1st of april 2016

i don't feel i've recovered at all. just the same extreme of emotions and giving a shit or being absorbed in anything. anyone else in this boat? cannabis used to bring emotions an back but that's largely lost effect - i'll be high af and my perceptions/thoughts will be all stoned but i'll still be like, wow i feel absolutely almost nothing.

anyone else relate? it's been 5 years of this hell.

Lots of people who can relate, unfortunately... what was your usage like prior to this starting? what have you tried in the years to address it? any other symptoms beyond anhedonia / depression?
 

Bearjer971

Greenlighter
Joined
Oct 8, 2021
Messages
2
Hi so I took molly 2 nights in a row this last Friday and Saturday I took about .3 the first night and split .5 with 3 people the next day and rolled pretty decent both nights but I woke up Sunday with severe trembling and I was so nauseous I couldn't even stand. I ended up sleeping for a while that night and the next day I was still nauseous but doing a little better. Well since then I now constantly feel hyperfocused like I'm always in fight or flight mode and super anxious and incredibly emotional to the point were I just cry about anything and have had trouble sleeping to the point I've been taking meds and still wake up multiple times a night. It's been 5 days and I still feel this way and tbh I am scared I will never go back to normal like I damaged my brain. I have tried Googling this and all its done is freak me out more. Has anyone else gone through this and does it ever get better?
 

semisober

Greenlighter
Joined
Oct 14, 2020
Messages
11
Hi so I took molly 2 nights in a row this last Friday and Saturday I took about .3 the first night and split .5 with 3 people the next day and rolled pretty decent both nights but I woke up Sunday with severe trembling and I was so nauseous I couldn't even stand. I ended up sleeping for a while that night and the next day I was still nauseous but doing a little better. Well since then I now constantly feel hyperfocused like I'm always in fight or flight mode and super anxious and incredibly emotional to the point were I just cry about anything and have had trouble sleeping to the point I've been taking meds and still wake up multiple times a night. It's been 5 days and I still feel this way and tbh I am scared I will never go back to normal like I damaged my brain. I have tried Googling this and all its done is freak me out more. Has anyone else gone through this and does it ever get better?
Lots of people have experienced this. The overwhelming majority get better pretty quickly. 5 days is nothing - your brain went through a lot. The best you can do is relax, eat well, get some exercise, try to get some sleep, and try not to worry about it. Millions of people have taken molly with no permanent issues in larger doses than you did.
 

longlongtermcd

Greenlighter
Joined
Oct 7, 2021
Messages
6
i wasn't using much at all. prior to dosing on the 1st of april 2016, i had maybe a small amount on 1st of jan 2016, and maybe some in september 2015. even on 1st of april it was like 'just' two lines of mixed md and coke.

i did use an immune supressant (for crohn's disease, an auto immune disease) on april 1st as well - though i'd be 'on' the same drug while doing molly before, on april i had been dosed the same day.

since then i've tried like

idk

20 differnet supplements; lithium, preganolone, selank/semax, nsi 189, uridine, piracetam, loads of shit.

nsi 189 (with zero tolerance) brought back emotions somewhat - but it soon lost that effect (it lasted maybe for 1 day of dosing and then the next day the effect
was nearly all gone. and then i'll have to wait a year etc, to dose again, or else i'll do nothing.)

prozac also, on the first day of dosing with zero tolerance, seems to bring the emos back somewhat. but then the second day, third etc, does nothing noticable (and i'm p sure
this isn't just me adjusting to the new higher level of emos.'

aside from that nothing has helped. it's hell and i wouldn't wish this on anyone.

other symptoms:

tinnitus sometimes -

awful sleep, esp for the first few years after. like wake up 12 times a night. no dreams or very low emo but intense dreams. i had extreme anger and agitation, felt like my mind was racing and couldn't
rest at all. prozac helps with this. didn't get any of the stranger symptoms like HPPD or w/e.

what have you tried/where are the others who haven't recovered? afaik on this forum everyone said that everyone got better within 24 months or so?
 
Last edited:

longlongtermcd

Greenlighter
Joined
Oct 7, 2021
Messages
6
oh should also add - i hadn't really felt much change to 2019 june, so after that i just sort of started dosing mdma again. probably done it like 9 times since. idk if this has made things worse or not. i feel incredibly dense about it now. i just felt so miserable and alienated on nights out, and wanted desperately to believe what all the drs etc told me - that it was psychosomatic and so on.
 

blata123

Greenlighter
Joined
Oct 4, 2019
Messages
3
i wasn't using much at all. prior to dosing on the 1st of april 2016, i had maybe a small amount on 1st of jan 2016, and maybe some in september 2015. even on 1st of april it was like 'just' two lines of mixed md and coke.

i did use an immune supressant (for crohn's disease, an auto immune disease) on april 1st as well - though i'd be 'on' the same drug while doing molly before, on april i had been dosed the same day.

since then i've tried like

idk

20 differnet supplements; lithium, preganolone, selank/semax, nsi 189, uridine, piracetam, loads of shit.

nsi 189 (with zero tolerance) brought back emotions somewhat - but it soon lost that effect (it lasted maybe for 1 day of dosing and then the next day the effect
was nearly all gone. and then i'll have to wait a year etc, to dose again, or else i'll do nothing.)

prozac also, on the first day of dosing with zero tolerance, seems to bring the emos back somewhat. but then the second day, third etc, does nothing noticable (and i'm p sure
this isn't just me adjusting to the new higher level of emos.'

aside from that nothing has helped. it's hell and i wouldn't wish this on anyone.

other symptoms:

tinnitus sometimes -

awful sleep, esp for the first few years after. like wake up 12 times a night. no dreams or very low emo but intense dreams. i had extreme anger and agitation, felt like my mind was racing and couldn't
rest at all. prozac helps with this. didn't get any of the stranger symptoms like HPPD or w/e.

what have you tried/where are the others who haven't recovered? afaik on this forum everyone said that everyone got better within 24 months or so?

So I just saw your post and thought I'd drop back in to share some thoughts I have regarding LTC which will hopefully help.

I've had LTC since around Sep 2017, and for the first two years I saw no improvement at all. I only started improving slowly over 2 years in and now I feel like I'm getting close to complete recovery, although I feel like I still might take a few more months to get fully better. I've had all symptoms you've listed above including the inability to feel emotions, DP/DR, headaches, tinnitus, sleep disturbances, cognitive issues, sexual dysfunction etc so rest assured that your symptoms are normal. At my worst I thought I was permanently brain damaged and almost committed suicide. I've also been down the road of trying different supplements and drugs believing that LTC was a neurotransmitter related issue so I can completely relate to your situation.

I honestly believe there is a lot of misinformation on this forum around the nature of LTC which hindered my recovery, first and foremost being that LTC is caused by MDMA damaging serotonin receptors and axons in the brain or MDMA throwing off the production/balance of serotonin and that the damage is permanent. 3-4 years ago when I obsessively trawled this forum looking for a cure there was a
photo which I think a lot of people in this forum have seen being passed around which showed that MDMA causes permanent serotonin axon damage in rats. However if you look at the original study the MDMA doses given to these rats were incredibly high and concentrated at 5mg/kg twice daily for 7 days straight. That's equivalent to 350mg for a 70kg person twice a day for 7 days and not reflective at all of how most people on the forum have used MDMA and gotten LTC. If you were to drink alcohol 20-30 standard drinks twice a day for 7 days straight I'm pretty sure you'd get brain damaged too. Also if you google there are also a lot of studies showing that it is inconclusive whether MDMA damages serotonin axons at normal recreational doses. So I highly doubt MDMA causes serotonin axon damage at the doses which most people on this forum have used MDMA. In any case the brain is neuroplastic and people have recovered from far worse such as concussions, brain surgeries, CTEs to live fulfilling lives and there are a lot of activities that people do which 'damage' the brain such as drinking, smoking weed, stress from work/life and they still seem to be ok. So MDMA does not damage your brain and therefore LTC is not a neurotransmitter/or neurotransmitter axon related issue.

In my opinion LTC is mental illness/mental health related. So you might say in response to that - I don't or didn't have a mental health issue. And I would say in response I completely understand where you're coming from because once upon a time I felt the same way too. Years ago I always had a certain impression of depression/anxiety and never believed it would be something I would personally experience. When I had LTC I was also diagnosed with depression by my GP and I never expected depression would feel like that. Also your LTC symptoms only started after doing MDMA right? But be honest with yourself - in the years and months prior to your LTC were you really satisfied with life? Or did your energy levels decline slowly for years prior? Did you slowly feel more disconnected from your friends, your emotions and lose interest in activities and social life? Did you ever feel something was off in your life but could never pinpoint what it was? Or did you ever feel stressed out from work/study or feel like your life was headed in the wrong direction? If so, which I think 99% of people on this forum would have experienced, your LTC is actually mental health related.

So with mental health and specifically LTC there are a couple of relevant concepts which helped me and might help you.

Thinking/Feeling/Acting
First and foremost how you think affects how you feel and act, and how you feel affects how you think and act. Similar to riding a bike, conscious thought patterns we develop, especially when we're younger slowly become unconscious over time. When they become unconscious that basically affects how we feel. This process doesn't happen overnight - it happens over years and decades. This is why you could take a room full of 5 year olds and they act similarly, then decades later they become completely different people who can't relate with one another. The different thinking patterns and values they adopt from their parents and society eventually change the trajectory of their life, and given years and decades become very difficult to change. Some thought patterns are helpful, and some thought patterns are harmful. With mental health issues people develop harmful values and thinking patterns which affect their self-image, ability to connect with others and cause unnecessary stress/anxiety in life. These thoughts become more and more difficult but not impossible to address the older we become. If you've ever felt a sense that you're stuck acting a certain way or stuck feeling a certain way this is why. A lot of symptoms of LTC overlap with those of depression, and although LTC and depression may not be exactly the same I feel that they are very much related. With depression in my personal opinion I believe that it's not really a neurotransmitter imbalance related illness, I think it's a social/relationship/behavioural/emotional illness caused by dysfunctional thinking patterns which have become so ingrained over time that they've become subconscious affecting the way we feel and interact with others. The depressive symptoms are our body's and mind's way of telling us we need to change and are an evolutionary mechanism similar to pain telling us something's wrong. For example rumination is a classic symptom of depression. Have you ever thought that rumination might be helpful to unpack why we think the way we think and our subconscious behaviour? A well documented effect of depression is depressive realism - apparently people with depression tend to see issues less subjectively and more objectively. That allows us to see our own issues more objectively and identify which areas in our lives need improvement. With DP/DR we are less present in the current moment and it feels almost like we're an objective bystander to our own life. This forces us to take a pause from life and view our own behaviour and thinking patterns more objectively. I think depression is an important evolutionary mechanism to make us reassess our lives when things go wrong.

Chronic Stress/Anxiety or Trauma
I would say basically everybody on this forum has experienced DP/DR. DP/DR is a condition not necessarily limited to LTC. There are a lot of instances where people get DP/DR after smoking weed, or a traumatic incident or after chronic stress. DP/DR occurs when the stress or anxiety you experience exceeds your brain's capacity to endure it and therefore your brain changes mode and instead you become numb and disconnected from your surroundings and emotions. Stress and anxiety are partially related to the events in our lives but also to the way our minds assign meaning to the events which happen to us. For example two people might do the same job and one person feels extremely stressed out whereas the other really enjoys their job. This is related to how these two people view their jobs - one might view their job as a learning experience and opportunity to try new things, whereas the other might view their job as a role in which they need to perform or they'll get fired and they'll be unable to feed their family. With social anxiety for example people might be socially anxious because they are afraid of people judging them by what they say or do. Therefore they are afraid to be themselves and worry about what others think of them. This fear of judgement might be because sometime in the past they acted a certain way and people responded a certain way rejecting them, therefore they became conditioned to not act that way or care more about what others thought of them. Of course for some people there is probably also a genetic predisposition to anxiety although I think the genetic predisposition might be overstated and can be overcome by changing the way you think. For example, some people are more socially anxious than others because they are more sensitive to what people think of them than others (the genetic connection). However, once they understand that in society there is a wide spectrum of people, everybody has 'haters' but also people who would accept them for being themselves and oftentimes whether they are accepted or not is not a reflection of on their own actions/behaviour but rather the values and beliefs of the other person or in other words 'haters gonna hate' and 'who gives a fuck what other think' their social anxiety can be alleviated. This is just one example of how thinking patterns can address whether or not and how we experience anxiety. So in summary chronic stress/anxiety is a major contributing factor to DP/DR which is partially influenced by genetics, our external environment, our experiences and also the values, beliefs and thinking patterns we have which affect the meaning we assign to external events. In order to recover we need to either change our external environment to reduce stressors, or change the thinking patterns we use to interpret our external environment.

Emotions
So almost everybody on this forum has probably experienced emotional numbness. I can't speak for anybody else here but with my personal experience I've realised that a lot of my emotional numbness was caused by denying and repressing my emotions, over a period of close to 8 years. When I started recovering I started realising how important and necessary emotions are to mental wellbeing and also the concept of emotional maturity. So I'm a 26 y.o. male, and when I was younger ~16 years old I started picking up toxic masculinity traits such as emotions are 'gay' and 'real men' don't show emotion and I started to consciously repress the way I felt. I thought 'real men' acted like James Bond or Jordan Belfort in the 'Wolf of Wall Street'. I'm not sure about the ladies on this forum but I think this might actually be a very common thinking pattern shared by men. Over time repressing my emotions became so ingrained in my psyche I became emotionally numb and unable to feel as it had become an unconscious habit. However what I didn't realise at the time was that emotions are crucial for cognition, feeling connected with others and just feeling alive. Why is that? Emotions are actually an internal evolutionary feedback mechanism which guide us towards doing things which help us survive and feel good. Feeling happy after playing basketball or meeting up with friends? Makes you want to do more right? Feeling sad after a friend heads overseas for work? Makes you want to spend more time with that friend and appreciate the other friends you have around you and value the fact that your time with them is limited and precious. Feeling angry after losing a basketball game? Makes you want to practise harder and more motivated to find ways to win future games. Feeling hurt after saying something and feeling that a friend's judging your character? Makes you think about whether what you said was socially acceptable or not or makes you reconsider your friendship. Emotions are a vital feedback mechanism which helps us determine what activities we should do, who we should associate with and helps us make sure we act in socially acceptable ways. In addition, being able to express emotion appropriately is completely necessary for mental wellbeing. Humans are conditioned to be social - since the dawn of humanity humans lived in tribes and societies because living together meant a greater chance of survival. Being able to express emotions signals to our friends that we enjoy their company, or that we find what they say offensive, or that we need their help during a time of sadness and allows others to either recalibrate their behaviour so they know how to act in a more socially acceptable manner or comfort us to meet our emotional needs or to hang around us more often. So there is also nothing wrong in being able to express emotion in fact it is important and necessary to be able to express how you feel. Earlier I touched upon the concept of emotional maturity. From what I understand, emotional maturity is realising the importance of emotions, being able to identify what we feel, why we feel that way and also being able to express that in an age appropriate manner. Basically all kids are taught subjects such as math, science and language growing up but not all kids are taught 'emotional maturity' which is just as important. Whether or not kids are taught emotional maturity depends on whether their family understands this concept which is influenced by the values and beliefs of the parent and also cultural attitudes. In my opinion being able to 'feel' is almost like a skill which needs to be learnt just like math or writing and can be lost if we don't practice it over time through social conditioning. For example, let's delve into childhood developmental psychology. If a child has emotionally responsive parents they would feel comfortable expressing their emotions e.g. wanting a new toy knowing that their parents would meet their needs. On the other hand if a child grew up with abusive parents they would not feel comfortable expressing their emotions as they have been socially conditioned to believe that if they expressed their emotions they would either not be met or that they would be scorned by their parents. This is an extreme example but oftentimes emotional repression can have its roots in childhood, traumatic events, social exclusion or thinking patterns developed over time becoming subconscious habits. During my LTC I had headaches, eye clenching, chest tightness and muscles pains which I now realise were psychosomatic symptoms of repressed emotions and have greatly improved after relearning 'how to feel'.

Recovery Process
So in order to recover what you need to do is:
1. Accept that LTC is mental health related, that you're not brain damaged in any way and that LTC and DP/DR is a natural response by your mind to overwhelming stress or thinking patterns which have led to a breakdown in your relationships/work/self image. The symptoms that you're experiencing is your mind telling you you need to take a break and rethink how you're thinking and acting in a way which allows you to better connect with others, prioritise activities and work which makes you happy and reduce stress in your life.
2. Reduce external stressors, change your environment or understand and reframe the root thinking patterns which are contributing to you feeling stress and anxiety.
3. Reexamine your values and beliefs and thinking patterns so that you can express your true self and do prioritise activities and work congruent to your personality and what's really important to you.
4. Relearn to feel emotions, identify emotions, express emotions so you can better connect with others.

Once you address these issues you will start to recover and your physical symptoms will start to subside as well! There is no quick fix and this process has taken years for me. This process also might sound easy but is actually incredibly hard, but once you start to recover you'll slowly start to realise again how incredible life can be and come out the other side a much better person.

A lot of my thoughts have been developed through my experience of getting better, extensive reading and also SpiderBro who added me awhile back to a LTC reddit support group. After speaking to a lot of the other people in the group it confirmed my belief that LTC is mental illness related, not neurotransmitter related, at least over the long term.

Hope this was useful.
 

longlongtermcd

Greenlighter
Joined
Oct 7, 2021
Messages
6
> However if you look at the original study the MDMA doses given to these rats were incredibly high and concentrated at 5mg/kg twice daily for 7 days straight. That's equivalent to 350mg for a 70kg person twice a day for 7 days and not reflective at all of how most people on the forum have used MDMA and gotten LTC. If you were to drink alcohol 20-30 standard drinks twice a day for 7 days straight I'm pretty sure you'd get brain damaged too. Also if you google there are also a lot of studies showing that it is inconclusive whether MDMA damages serotonin axons at normal recreational doses. So I highly doubt MDMA causes serotonin axon damage at the doses which most people on this forum have used MDMA.

so i disagree here. at least in the UK, it's p normal to do a gram a night or so. I don't know about the purity but if you combine that with + factors or a particular susceptibility to injury i think you can start to approach 'crazy' doses used in the study. i alwasy get freaked out when people say that 150mg is like a high dose, bc here in london everyone buys a gram and sort of shares it round and everyone adds in a lot of shit and overall i wouldn't be suprised if you managed 500mg+ per session.

for example here:


a woman DIES after taking 500mg. DIES. everyone else in her friendship group taking similar amounts seems fine. sometimes you can just have a bad reaction and die - so it seems reasonable to suppose sometimes you can just have a bad reaction and your (neurons) die a bit.
 

Bearjer971

Greenlighter
Joined
Oct 8, 2021
Messages
2
I am new to having these symptoms and although it has only been 6 days since I rolled I can say I don't break down crying for no reason anymore and sleep aids actually help me sleep, I slept 6 hours without waking up last night which the last 5 days It was only 3-4 hours. I still have head pressure and hyper alertness which is probably just the incredibly bad anxiety i have as well since it feels like flight or fight mode, I wonder do your neurons and receptors heal or regrow like I've read? I definitely see improvement in myself but not so much that I feel close to healed and it's only been 1 day. I also see probably 95% of the people who have ltc heal whether it takes them 2 months or 10 years(yes I've seen a post where it took someone a decade to start to heal). I'm trying to figure this all out and start finding a positive outlook were I don't get on here or the internet looking for answers that either stress me out or are positive and make me search for more answers. Alot of the scientific studies I found all conflict with each other and I also want to know if taking a ssri and benzos might help the healing process
 
Top