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Any good supplements for lowering cholesterol ?

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Draven26

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Do you guys take anything to lower cholesterol or have you in the past? What has worked best for you?
 

Draven26

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Why do you want to lower LDL? try lowering triglycerides (knock out sugars), and increasing saturated fats..
My girlfriend’s doctor told her it was high and prescribed her simvastatin but she refuses to take it because of the bad side effects and I don’t blame her. I was thinking red yeast
 

Genetic Freak

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My girlfriend’s doctor told her it was high and prescribed her simvastatin but she refuses to take it because of the bad side effects and I don’t blame her. I was thinking red yeast
LDL-C (on its own) is no longer seen as a risk factor for coronary vascular disease, so statin therapy is not warranted (your girlfriend is correct to refuse them)..
Triglycerides elevate LDL in blood, therefore lower intake of sugars including high glycemic carbohydrates..
Eat more healthy fats.. Totally eliminate vegetable seed oils, and reduce grains..
 

G_Chem

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Fish oil or something omega 3.

I can’t stress enough healthy fats, low/no sugars, and low dairy. My numbers are so damn good I almost couldn’t even believe it.

-GC
 

Genetic Freak

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My girlfriend’s doctor told her it was high and prescribed her simvastatin but she refuses to take it because of the bad side effects and I don’t blame her. I was thinking red yeast
Instead of looking at blood LDL which is no longer seen as a marker for CVD, monitor Triglyceride : HDL ratio, that is seen as a preferred marker, as opposed to LDL, which is no longer..
As previously stated to lower triglycerides significantly lower sugar intake (this includes many carbohydrates also), plus increase healthy fats to increase HDL...
 

The Axe

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Some peoples' liver naturally produce too much LDL choleterol, it's genetic and is inhereted. It can lead to plaque in the arteries, enlarged aorta, high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, congestive heart failure, etc. I have heart disease on both sides of my family, numerous relatives with heart disease, premature death from heart attack, stroke, multiple bypass surgeries, etc. A distant cousin died while giving birth after her doctors told her that her heart would fail if she went ahead with the birth (baby was okay but mom didn't survive). Personally I'd go with medication, diet, and exercise to manage high cholesterol, its very effective, easy to do and worth it in the long run.
 

Genetic Freak

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Some peoples' liver naturally produce too much LDL cholesterol, it's genetic and is inherited. It can lead to plaque in the arteries, enlarged aorta, high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, congestive heart failure, etc. I have heart disease on both sides of my family, numerous relatives with heart disease, premature death from heart attack, stroke, multiple bypass surgeries, etc. A distant cousin died while giving birth after her doctors told her that her heart would fail if she went ahead with the birth (baby was okay but mom didn't survive). Personally I'd go with medication, diet, and exercise to manage high cholesterol, its very effective, easy to do and worth it in the long run.
Do you suffer from hypercholesterolemia..? I have a work colleague with similar, the mechanism is dysregulation of LDL receptor in the liver, leading to increased LDL particles in blood..
The presence of LDL doesn't correlate with deleterious cardiovascular pathology unless accompanied by chronic inflammation, elevated BP, insulinemia, etc, etc..
This can be mitigated via lifestyle factors as previously stated: knock out sugars, vegetable seed oils, grains, alcohol, tobacco etc...

Relative risk reduction of statin therapy has been much embellished, compared to absolute risk reduction, which is miniscule...
Lower blood triglycerides (sugar), increases functional HDL, plus lowers potential for oxidised or glycated LDL (sdLDL, LP(a) ) known to increase cardiovascular mortality..
You don't need statins, statins lower large particle LDL known to cause no issue, but don't lower sdLDL which has been shown to increase likelihood of plaque formation in coronary arteries...
 

Swim15

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I’d go with citrus bergamot but as stated, LDL isn’t necessarily the only thing to look at. That said, I wouldn’t want it sky high either
 

osft

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For me, who is on a cruise/high TRT of about 90-130mg/week of test enanthate and 15-35mg/week each of EQ and NPP, the concern is not so much with blood tests .. but with the waxy pimples and plugged pores that become a problem- if the inside of my arteries looks anything like that, it's bad news. I am talking waxy lumps in ears, wax filled pores on nose, and especially chest. Toward the end of as long very hot shower, I scrape my chest with my fingernails and beige crud fills up under them a dozen times, and remains bumpy feeling despite my best efforts. And yes, I shower every morning- long one. Admittedly probably only every other one that I pay full attention to this.
I do the test oils as a weekly shot, and this effect is at its worst from days 4-6 of 7.

My diet is good- breakfast to me is a bare raw turkey breast fried in a non stick pan, and a tray of fruit salad/melon, for example OTOH There is a milk based 2% protein drink that I like that I think has a lot of guar gum or carrageenan... and I do have a big bag of almonds (roasted, skin on) as a snack food bot at the computer at home and the computer at work. I also eat quite a bit of reduced fat (15-24%) cheese. I seem to crave it. Perhaps because other than that I east a reduced salt diet... and/or just eat minimally. I'm maintaining a 14-15% BF without exercise at 48yo.
My meat fat consumption is nil.

btw one thing- my research a half dozen years ago showed hemp hearts to be the exception to any "grain oils" rule of thumb. Is that agreed?
 

PrincessDiz

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Do you suffer from hypercholesterolemia..? I have a work colleague with similar, the mechanism is dysregulation of LDL receptor in the liver, leading to increased LDL particles in blood..
The presence of LDL doesn't correlate with deleterious cardiovascular pathology unless accompanied by chronic inflammation, elevated BP, insulinemia, etc, etc..
This can be mitigated via lifestyle factors as previously stated: knock out sugars, vegetable seed oils, grains, alcohol, tobacco etc...

Relative risk reduction of statin therapy has been much embellished, compared to absolute risk reduction, which is miniscule...
Lower blood triglycerides (sugar), increases functional HDL, plus lowers potential for oxidised or glycated LDL (sdLDL, LP(a) ) known to increase cardiovascular mortality..
You don't need statins, statins lower large particle LDL known to cause no issue, but don't lower sdLDL which has been shown to increase likelihood of plaque formation in coronary arteries...
I’ve met several people who’s bodies produce cholesterol regardless of diet. One had been on a strict custom keto diet for a year and still had shockingly high levelss. He had familial hypercholesterolemia and the only thing that lowered his levels was . No amount of lifestyle change will effectively lower the cholesterol. It’s a genetic mutation. We tested a load of statins recently that had been marked for random batch tests and a work colleague just happened to say he suffers from FH also. His family all have history of heart attacks and stroke from ages 30 up to deaths starting at 55. Really quite scary. He found out when he was 34 and is now on therapy and being closely monitored. His cousin died from a massive stroke at 35 recently which was really sad.
 

thegreenhand

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Honestly just eating a more plant based diet will be most effective. That doesn't have to mean ALL plant based but incorparting more calories from plants vs animal products will definitely lower cholesterol
 

Genetic Freak

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I’ve met several people who’s bodies produce cholesterol regardless of diet. One had been on a strict custom keto diet for a year and still had shockingly high levelss. He had familial hypercholesterolemia and the only thing that lowered his levels was statins. No amount of lifestyle change will effectively lower the cholesterol. It’s a genetic mutation. We tested a load of statins recently that had been marked for random batch tests and a work colleague just happened to say he suffers from FH also. His family all have history of heart attacks and stroke from ages 30 up to deaths starting at 55. Really quite scary. He found out when he was 34 and is now on statin therapy and being closely monitored. His cousin died from a massive stroke at 35 recently which was really sad.
LDL-C on its own shows no evidence for increased mortality via coronary occlusion, chronic inflammation must be present generally inclusive of hypertension to induce damage and subsequent plaque formation in coronary arteries regardless of presenting with FH..
Excessive sugar intake increases triglycerides, and blood insulin, which in turn increases LDL-C, and lowers HDL, also leading to non functional HDL, vegetable seed oils damage glycocalyx, sugars glycate APOB-100 transmembrane protein, plus oxidation and sdLDL formation (known to block coronary arteries)..
Cholesterol is essential to life...
 

PrincessDiz

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LDL-C on its own shows no evidence for increased mortality via coronary occlusion, chronic inflammation must be present generally inclusive of hypertension to induce damage and subsequent plaque formation in coronary arteries regardless of presenting with FH..
Excessive sugar intake increases triglycerides, and blood insulin, which in turn increases LDL-C, and lowers HDL, also leading to non functional HDL, vegetable seed oils damage glycocalyx, sugars glycate APOB-100 transmembrane protein, plus oxidation and sdLDL formation (known to block coronary arteries)..
Cholesterol is essential to life...
You’re not understanding what I’m saying, ironic considering your handle.

FH is caused by a genetic mutation, it means the body can’t clear ANY cholesterol, good or bad. It just builds and builds over time creating blockages. It doesn’t matter what type of diet you would have.

Of course cholesterol is essential but too much of it is not conducive to a healthy body. FH can not be controlled with diet. You need to be on statins. In fact if you have undiagnosed, untreated FH your life expectancy would be reduced by 20-30 years.
 

Genetic Freak

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You’re not understanding what I’m saying, ironic considering your handle.

FH is caused by a genetic mutation, it means the body can’t clear ANY cholesterol, good or bad. It just builds and builds over time creating blockages. It doesn’t matter what type of diet you would have.

Of course cholesterol is essential but too much of it is not conducive to a healthy body. FH can not be controlled with diet. You need to be on statins. In fact if you have undiagnosed, untreated FH your life expectancy would be reduced by 20-30 years.
NO..!!! You are not understanding..!!

I am fully aware of the mechanisms behind FH having researched it extensively..
Without chronic inflammation induced via actions stated previously no amount of dietary cholesterol will create issue in coronary vasculature if diet is on point..
Are you aware increased LDL in over 50's is associated with reduced mortality..

Look into relative risk reduction V absolute risk reduction of statins..!!
 

PrincessDiz

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NO..!!! You are not understanding..!!

I am fully aware of the mechanisms behind FH having researched it extensively..
Without chronic inflammation induced via actions stated previously no amount of dietary cholesterol will create issue in coronary vasculature if diet is on point..
Are you aware increased LDL in over 50's is associated with reduced mortality..

Look into relative risk reduction V absolute risk reduction of statins..!!
Edit: You are quoting a study that was flawed! And you edited my post to make it look like I didn’t address you saying that! Why?! Here’s some info from an insight into the flawed study you’re using like it’s gospel when it’s far from it.

“The total number of people involved in the study was nearly 70,000, but only 9 of the 19 studies actually included deaths from heart and circulatory disease.

Moreover, two-thirds of the total number of participants in this new analysis are from one study (Bathum et al 2013). This study found that higher cholesterol (total, HDL, or LDL) in people aged 50+ was associated with a lower all-cause mortality. That study also showed that taking a prescription provided a significant survival benefit, regardless of age, whereas the researchers in this new analysis are using it to argue against .

They relied on limited, aggregated and inconsistent information …an approach liable to bias
John Danesh
BHF Professor of Epidemiology
Furthermore, the research, published in the BMJ Open journal, has been deemed unbalanced due to what John Danesh, BHF Professor of Epidemiology said was “crude study methods”. This is because their analysis "relied on limited, aggregated and inconsistent information from published sources, an approach liable to bias.”

Similarly Colin Baigent, of the University of Oxford, has described the study as reaching “completely the wrong conclusion. In fact, we know that cholesterol is just as important as a cause of heart disease in older people as it is in the young. We know this because of the evidence from all the randomized trials of statin therapy, which collectively have studied substantial numbers of older people.”

The authors themselves said that “We may have overlooked relevant studies as we only searched PubMed” (an online search for medical publications), and they may have excluded studies that evaluated LDL-C as a risk factor for death, if the study did not mention it in the title or abstract. “We may have overlooked a small number of relevant studies because we only searched papers in English,” they added.

Dr Tim Chico, a consultant cardiologist at Northern General Hospital in Sheffield, said there are several studies that has shown lowering cholesterol using a drug does reduce the risk of heart disease in the elderly. He said: “I am surprised the authors of this study do not refer to such trials, which tends to make their own paper disappointingly unbalanced.”




You don’t understand anything about FH because if you actually read about it then you’d see diet won’t help. By the time someone is told they have FH it’s too late to implement a diet, they need . If you know you’ve FH in your family and get tested at a young age then yeah, maybe diet could help but again it’s not been properly studied and I’d imagine they’d need eventually.
 
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Genetic Freak

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You understand fuck all about FH because if you actually read about it then you’d see diet won’t help. By the time someone is told they have FH it’s too late to implement a diet, they need statins. If you know you’ve FH in your family and get tested at a young age then yeah, maybe diet could help but again it’s not been properly studied and I’d imagine they’d need statins eventually.
Diet lowers chronic inflammation, glycation, and oxidation (I shouldn't need to elaborate further)..!!
 

PrincessDiz

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Diet lowers chronic inflammation, glycation, and oxidation (I shouldn't need to elaborate further)..!!
Look, diet won’t help a genetic condition because the FH body literally can not get rid on excess cholesterol. So it builds and builds and builds. A normal body, of course diet would help with cholesterol but with someone with FH it does not. That is the fact. Diet does not work for someone with FH. End of.
 
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