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Film What's the Last Film You Saw? v. Tell Us What You Thought!

ghostfreak

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Actually managed to watch the whole trilogy yesterday, worth the watch tbh - one of the better found footage films (apart from Grave Encounters and PA).

Start from the first one as if you just dive into the second or even third you'll be confused as hell.

Check the first two out on Prime free or the whole trilogy on Shudder.
 

ghostfreak

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I love found footage films and this is no exception. Been dying to see this for a while and it’s worth the watch! Some jump scares but it just gets creepier and creepier as you start noticing things in the background etc.

Watch if you can!
 

Cream Gravy?

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Interiors ( 1978 )

This was the most serious Woody Allen flick I've ever seen, and it was executed brilliantly. For once Roger Ebert and I agreed about a film heh.

There was none of the laughter or awkward humor here that we saw in Annie Hall or Manhattan in the years prior; instead, we get a serious look at a wealthy family that is coming apart at the seems due to both high expectations of their offspring and the splitting of the parents. Their kids, in their late 20s/early 30s, struggle to achieve the success their parents have, struggle to impress their parents, struggle to accept their father being well... a man.

The whole film is really just a shit ton of dialogue; arguments, both petty and egregious. The characters are so real, the acting so seamless, that I felt as if I could identify greatly with them. In my own life I've struggled to live up to what my parents did before me, struggled to understand them, watched as my wife's parents grew apart from one another eventually leading to a divorce... this film was so relatable it almost hurt. The 90 minute run time is almost too much, the film is so jam packed that you feel hard pressed to pause or stand up and feel as if you've just watched a 150 minute film instead.

The name was so apt too; the film focuses heavily on interior shots and close up dialogue. We see the 'interiors' of these people as they struggle and can't help but feel their pains.

An amazingly serious character study from the least serious of directors. I loved this movie.

8.5/10
 
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Atelier3

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I watched The Personal History of David Copperfield last night. Very very funny. Also one of those historical movies now doing race-blind casting. So half of Charles Dickens characters are black. Which is super weird at first because you have a black mother and a white son and an Asian father and a black daughter. You get used to it quickly though and it kind of adds to the film.

 

ghostfreak

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Another surprising watch. Enjoyed it as it was a different kind of exorcist film - kept you watching which was great.
 

Max Power

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Wow, my little thread is still going. *sheds a tear*

Singin' in the Rain (1952)
This is a one of those films that's included in so many 'best of' lists but I put it off forever. I suppose the genre 'classic musical' never inspired me much. It was colorful and quite entertaining, keeping my attention throughout and eliciting more than a few belly laughs. For a movie this old, it never felt dated, even though the plot centers around 'talkies being the cat's meow'. 4/5

Rebel Without a Cause (1955)
Talk about feeling dated, this one might as well have been a Victorian period drama. With older films, especially 60+ year old ones like this, I try to keep that in mind as a frame of reference. And I get it -- this film was challenging social norms of teenagers and their mental health, challenging the all-powerful paternal authority of the time. It must have caused quite the stir back in 1955. That being said, this film was overrated and the only saving grace was James Dean's acting (and even that was overly melodramatic at times). 2/5

Once Upon a Crime (1992)
A film directed by Eugene Levy, starring John Candy, John Belushi, and Cybill Shepherd? What could go wrong? Everything, apparently. There really isn't much to say here, other than it felt like it went on way too long. There was a chuckle or two, tops. Huge let down. 1/5

Suspiria (1977)
Definition of "all style, no substance". The plot was thin, the acting was eh, and the gore was cheesy. The colors tho: *chef's kiss*. It was the prettiest horror film I've seen. This is what I imagine what people mean when they talk about 'art house' films. You can feel the impact and influence this had on future horror films (read: every teenage slasher ever) and culture at large, especially the soundtrack. The aesthetic ultimately carries this film. 3/5
 

ghostfreak

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I love these killer car films, popcorn horror as you say. Basically a guy’s soul goes into this car that immediately starts killing people linked to his murder. Also a group of cyberpunk looking enemies are after some chip he supposedly had.

Another good one is ‘Hybrid’ - I might have linked it a few pages back.
 

birdup.snaildown

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The Breaker Upperers ( 2018 )

I'm a sucker for silly comedies and this didn't disappoint. Produced by Taika Waititi (Thor Ragnarok, Jojo Rabbit, What We Do In The Shadows) and co-directed by Jackie Van Beek (Wellington Paranormal). This is a low budget New Zealand comedy about a small business that helps people end relationships. The writers /directors /stars are both female. There are a lot of vagina jokes, but they're good vagina jokes.

It's not a perfect film, but it manages to be funnier than the VAST majority of Hollywood garbage produced these days, without relying on a big budget or any big name actors... Except a cameo from Jemaine Clement.
 
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Coffeeshroom

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Though not a movie but a series but so far im enjoying it and the story line. The Mandalorian it's called that gives you a bit of a back story to the bounty hunters of the movie franchise (Star Wars). Very interesting and with top grade effects like the movie so they clearly had a big budget but i would advise this to any Star Wars fan.
 

Cream Gravy?

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Hannah and Her Sisters (1986)

Another Woody Allen flick, this was one of his best. It felt a lot like what he did with Interiors, only less serious, more humor, more classic Woody. Carrie Fisher has an interesting cameo as do other actors who would later populate film as we know it. The mental struggles the characters faced were true to life, the love triangle aspects played out better than in Allen's later flicks, and the movie's pacing was quick yet still took almost two (enjoyable) hours.

Well worth the watch if you're into Allen's 'Love Triangle/Hectic Family' type plots. These tend to be what he's good at lol, draws on self experience I guess.

8/10



Tombstone (1993)

I had read a reviewer stating this was their favorite film, let alone Western, of all time.

I want whatever they smoked. My wife and I enjoyed this better than most of Sergio Leone's early efforts (outside Good Bad Ugly, that's just classic) and yet something was lacking... the star studded cast couldn't do enough to save the plot. Val Kilmer was in his worst form, a poorly acted dying Doc Holliday. Kurt Russel was okay as Wyatt Earp. Sam Elliot stood out, if only because the man was born to be in Westerns lol.

Anyways yeah, the plot dragged, it bored us, we began not asking the other to pause it when we'd leave the room type-deal. I was sorely disappointed after reading the reviews.

Now what this film did well, it did well; editing, costumes, set design, mainly aesthetic stuff. Val Kilmer's makeup artist is out of a job though I hope lol.

5.5/10
 
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Max Power

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This might be the year I watch the most movies so I should probably write down my thoughts sooner than later after viewings, else they get lost in the infinite.

The Player (1992)
This is a movie by Hollywood for Hollywood. It starts off with like a 7 minute long-take, at the end a character makes a fourth-wall-breaking-circle-jerking-pat-on-the-back-taking-comment about long takes. That meta kinda sets the tone for the rest of the film. Oh, and all the cameos. It has some 'smart humour' and a generally decent plot, but this seems more like Tinsletown self-gratification than anything. 2.5/5

The Lost Weekend (1945)
A tale as old as time: a writer drinks because he feels he's a shitty writer which makes him actually become a shitty writer so he drinks because he feels like a shitty writer causing him to... that's the bulk of this movie except he visits a couple places along the way. It has a heart at its core and its Billy Wilder so the writing is sharp. 3/5

Isle of Dogs (2019 )
I really enjoyed this one, moreso than Fantastic Mr Fox. This film from the get go screams Wes Anderson. The plot has great pacing, visual gags, and a feel good message. Most people would mention the voice cast as a plus but I actually thought it was a negative. Bryan Cranston, Bill Murray, Edward Norton, etc: their voices are way too recognizable that they actually take me out of the movie. Lesser known voices would have elevated this even more for me. 4/5

Judas and the Black Messiah (2020)
Didn't BlacKkKlansman already do this? Felt like the same movie, in a way. The guy from Get Out is great in this. This film feels very topical for today's political climate. But it just felt too dragged out at times, especially two thirds of the way in. The cinematography bump this one up to a 3.5/5

Princess Mononoke (1997)
Slowly but surely making my way thru Miyazaki. The animation is obviously top-notch and I guess this is the one where he goes all Ferngully on us. The best thing about this movie is the ethical complexity it offers, especially for what some might call a children's film. They say the best movies are two sides of a good argument. This felt like four sides. There might be other subtleties I'm missing, I dunno, its dense. Anyway, this was far from my favorite Miyazaki, but, like pizza . . . 3/5

Bad Boys For Life (2020)
Ha, you would have never guessed Michael Bay was no longer directing these. Also, holy Martin Lawrence got fat. The latest installment has the expected "I'm gettin' too old for this shit" jokes, the million dollar explosions & shoot outs, and of course, the bubble gum plot. But bottom line: It's entertaining. You know what you're getting into with this one: a comedy action blockbuster, and it delivers just that. Just put this one on in the background while you cook or the next time you "Netflix and chill" (are the kids still saying this?). If you don't think too hard while watching the movie: 3/5

Tenet (2020)
Woo buddy, is this Christopher Nolan in his final form? This feels like he's been leading up to this with Memento, Inception, Interstellar. The type you need at least a second rewatch to fully digest, but this pushes that idea to 11. I think I heard a quote that some days the actors didn't even understand what the fuck was going on. It immediately jumps headfirst into everything, taking like 15 seconds to explain what feels like PHD level quantum physics. Still, even if you don't totally get it, all is not lost thankfully. The action and acting and cinematography are all top notch. Nolan delivers. 4.5/5

Soul (2020)
I don't know if I haven't seen a Pixar film in awhile (Toy Story 4?) or because I saw this in 2160p, but what a damn good looking animated film! It reeled me in with some of the jazz scenes at the beginning. Also, it takes some balls to center a children's movie around Death! "If Miyazaki directed The Seventh Seal" is way too generous and almost nonsensical, but I just wanted to put that phrase out into the World. 3.75/5

Black Swan (2010)
This was well directed (shout out Arnofsky) and good acting by Portman. I wish Mila was in more scenes but I'll just have to rewatch That 70s Show to get my fix (just kidding, I wouldn't subject myself to that). I'm always down for a mind-fucky film, especially ones that rip off Perfect Blue! The ending kinda saves this. 3.5/5
 
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ghostfreak

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Aside from the really annoying roommate, this could have been so much more. Enjoyable to a degree but wouldn't watch again to be honest.

Binging on these social media horror films at the mo so always on the lookout for others.

Rated it 2\5 on Letterboxd (you can see all the films I've rated and reviewed in my signature).
 
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ghostfreak

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Love Bella Thorne’s films, she plays such dark characters with ease. The plot is easy enough to follow and you’ll probably figure out what’s going to happen as the film progresses.

Social media horror is really ramping up these days, maybe because of the pandemic but really enjoyed this. Live streaming their robberies for more followers and likes (more Bella than her boyfriend) ultimately ends in trouble for both of them.

Catch it if you can on Prime/iTunes/Google Play etc.

Next up: Assassination Nation
 

Cream Gravy?

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I'm always down for a mind-fucky film, especially ones that rip off Perfect Blue!
I love just how many films are rip offs of Perfect Blue. But also, Perfect Blue was a sorta rip-off of some older horror flick I watched recently, can't recall... probably wrote about it here somewhere.

Anyways, I loved Black Swan, I thought there was a lot more depth to it than Perfect Blue. Lots of commentary on the way we view females in society.

I need to write up some reviews before I forget too... watched A Rainy Day in New York, Phantasm, Out of Afrika, a few others this past week... but all hazy as I've been getting mega stoned throughout lol.
 

Max Power

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I love just how many films are rip offs of Perfect Blue. But also, Perfect Blue was a sorta rip-off of some older horror flick I watched recently, can't recall... probably wrote about it here somewhere.

Anyways, I loved Black Swan, I thought there was a lot more depth to it than Perfect Blue. Lots of commentary on the way we view females in society.

I need to write up some reviews before I forget too... watched A Rainy Day in New York, Phantasm, Out of Afrika, a few others this past week... but all hazy as I've been getting mega stoned throughout lol.
If you can remember the name, lemme know! Always down for movies with that Dostoevsky "The Double" type edge to them. Especially with a horror twist.

As far as depth, Black Swan had a different type than Perfect Blue. The latter explored more self-identity, voyeurism, and celebrity idol themes. Both very 'psychological' films, for lack of a better word. I wouldn't say one had way more depth than the other tho.

Alright, before I forget for equally-green reasons:

Alone in the Wilderness (2004)
On that Walden tip! This was such a beautiful film in so many ways. The scenery, obviously, but the isolation, the harmonious relationship with nature. Living like that would be amazing, but would it mean giving up music and film in exchange? Hm. Speaking of music, one day I will watch this on mute with Boards of Canada playing in the background and I bet it will fit perfectly. Forget the 'Dark Side of Oz'! 4/5

Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970)
First off, I love the cop names: "Gravedigger Jones and Coffin 'Ed' Johnson". Holy fuck. This was an okay blaxploitation flick. Always nice to see a Redd Foxx cameo and the two aforementioned leads were solid. The plot was a bit convoluted and plenty of cheese. I mainly enjoy these type of films for their preservation of 1970s NYC anyway. Oh and the Galt McDermott did the soundtrack so yeah. (This song is cooler than you ever will be.) 2.5/5

Supersoul Brother (1979)
Holy fuck this one is amazing. A blaxploitation heist film that revolves around two gangsters turning a wino into an indestructible superhuman. Disclaimer: there isn't much of a heist and there isn't much of a plot, either. But what it does have is several unintentionally hilarious "what in the ever living fuck am I watching" moments. The visual film scratches and missing frames add to the overall feel and aesthetic. As a result, its so bad its good. For me at least, I can definitely see this film's humor being very offensive and off-putting for some. Just refer to the film's original title!! That being said, if you take it with a grain of salt and laugh along at the pure absurdity of it all: 3.75/5

Stone Cold Killer (1973)
"You know what we got here? Motherfucking Charlie Bronson!" - Drexl Spivey. Love that quote. And this is indeed a motherfucking Charlie Bronson film. Tough cop, knocking on doors and kicking in teeth. Aaaand that's pretty much all it is. Some neat car chase scenes throughout. I found it hard to follow exactly what was going on outside Charles Bronson being Charles Bronson. Italian mobsters? Vietnam vets? Okay? Another one of those films that is a good preservation and look into 1970s NYC. Doesn't offer much more than that and Bronson being a complete badass as usual. Although I almost shit my pants when the MF DOOM/King Gheedorah sample hit OMG. 2.5/5

The Great McGinty (1940)
Always a sucker for a Preston Sturges film. The dialogue is always so sharp, quick, and witty. The two lead roles were solid. The buildup was great but I felt the ending was way rushed, or at least wasn't really satisfying given the ascent. I want to describe this as "if the Three Stooges tried to make a drama" because of all the physical roughhousing between the mobster and McGinty. But there isn't as much slapstick humor as that comparison would imply. 2.75/5
 

Cream Gravy?

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As far as depth, Black Swan had a different type than Perfect Blue. The latter explored more self-identity, voyeurism, and celebrity idol themes. Both very 'psychological' films, for lack of a better word. I wouldn't say one had way more depth than the other tho.
Fair enough, Perfect Blue was definitely something else lol. I remember being glued to the screen. I just haven't watched it as recently.

I think the film I was thinking of was Argento's Opera from I wana say 1987? It wasn't a Dostoevsky "The Double" type though, much more generic... style over substance. Just a very strikingly similar plot to Perfect Blue.

I just watched Tarantino's Death Proof I'll have to write some reviews soon... it was okay, least inspired of his films but enjoyable.
 

Max Power

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@Cream Gravy? regarding Death Proof: 'grindhouse' movies aren't really meant to be inspired anyway so you could argue Tarantino really nails it!

some quick hitters:

Con Air (1997)
Didn't enjoy this one as much this time around. What a cast tho. But holy this is 100% Hollywood packaged action blockbuster cheese. And not in a good, trusty Kraft single kind of way. 2.5/5

Ocean's 11 (1960)
The writers of Mad Men must have studied this one. Dapper gents sitting around sipping whiskey. Dino sings the same song four times for some reason. Ending was . . . different. The literal ending shot was Joe Cool as fuck -- Rat Pack walking down The Strip as the credits roll. 2.75/5

The Song Remains the Same (1976)
Wow, the boys really had a hard-on for Middle Earth huh? The fantasy scenes are fucking weird but Jimmy Page shreds. Rating the film though, not the music: 1.5/5

Godzilla vs Kong (2021)
First off, before I forget, this stars the kid from Hunt for the Wilderpeople which was a great film (4/5) so it was cool to see him in something else. I pretended it was the same character lol. Okay, so anyway, this film is what happens when you throw 500 million dollars at the CGI and 0 into the actual screenwriting. The scenes with the monkey fighting the giant lizard were pretty cool, but I could have done without everything else. Maybe I'm being too harsh; I hear this is the fourth in a 'universe' so maybe I have to watch them all to really 'get it'. But I won't so 2.5/5

Tokyo-Ga (1985)
This documentary was a cool look into everday life in 1985 Tokyo . . . through the eyes of a director trying to retrace the films of another director. This is probably enjoyable if you know at least one of the two and if you know both directors this film is probably REALLY enjoyable. As it stands, I know neither so a lot was lost on me outside of the footage of 80's Japan and even that isn't on screen for much of the movie. 1/5

Lake Mungo (2008 )
Interesting mockumentary-style horror film. It does the Blair Witch/Paranormal Activity thing without feeling too much like a trope or becoming a self-parody. It's a thin line (that it pushes towards the end). 3.25/5
 
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Burnt Offerings

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I really enjoyed "Black Swan", I thought that was a great one, classic psychological horror film. Natalie Portman definitely deserved her academy award for her performance in that one...I love how the film developed the theme of the main character losing her mind in subtle ways, slowly ratcheting up the tension and unease until the finale
 
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