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Study What tests can determine heart health and condition?

OpiateKiller

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Feb 14, 2019
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I’m wondering what tests can be done besides blood work to determine my hearts condition?

I know blood pressure and LDL / HDL cholesterol levels are important, anything else like an EKG?
 

Swim15

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EKG and electrocardiogram, both of which I am having done or have had done recently. Have an electrocardiogram on Tuesday actually
 
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mr peabody

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Hm. Well, there are also stress tests. Workups tend to be symptom-based. Are you experiencing problems you think might be cardiac-related?
 

OpiateKiller

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Hm. Well, there are also stress tests. Workups tend to be symptom-based. Are you experiencing problems you think might be cardiac-related?
no symptoms really just more of a precautionary move on my part, I mean at times on high doses of amphetamines and trenbolone I’ve had some concern as to very light chest pain, but otherwise my heart seems to be doing A OK.

Right now my blood pressure sits at 140/70 which I am happy with having been running Test and other steroids at 300-600 mg a week for almost 2 years consistently.
 

Genetic Freak

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Don't read too much into LDL-C, on its own its no longer thought to be a marker for CVD, Triglyceride to HDL ratio has more bearing.
If you can get centrifuge fractional LDL test, that may determine whether LDL particle is glycated, and/or oxidised, otherwise known as sdLDL..
Electrocardiogram, and more so Echocardiogram might determine ventricular thickness, and ejection fraction..
Try calcium score, if worried about plaque build up..
 

Swim15

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How old are you? I’d try and get that BP down under better control. Called a silent killer for a reason.

Glad I did and it was about 114/74 last time I took it and I definitely feel better than then it was 135-140.

I’d go with an ARB as mentioned on here
 

Shady's Fox

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Well for blood pressure/heart, I say Statins does a good job. EC... on the other side it doesn't tell you what you wanna know, when it will happen. There are some thing that these tests don't pick up. I really don't know much as I am not a doctor but I know little so I don't die stupid.
 

Swim15

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Well for blood pressure/heart, I say Statins does a good job. EC... on the other side it doesn't tell you what you wanna know, when it will happen. There are some thing that these tests don't pick up. I really don't know much as I am not a doctor but I know little so I don't die stupid.
Statins don’t treat blood pressure...

I think they have their uses but generally they aren’t good drugs. Citrus bergamot if you wanna go that route focusing on cholesterol.
 

Working_Class

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One thing that people don't watch enough is pulse pressure. The difference between your systolic and your diastolic is referred to as your pulse pressure.

A low diastolic can be just as indicative of poor arterial compliance as high systolic BP. I was on gear for a good 10 years and stopped last March because I could feel the damage. Suffice to say I got an echocardiogram and every chamber of my heart is dilated to the upper physiological limit of what is considered "normal", and I have always sort of had an issue with blood pressure. Typically, my diastolic was high with a low diastolic, and it's definitely an effort for me to keep it in the 120 / 70 range. My normal readings used to be around 140 / 65 - 135 / 60 ish.

What is considered a normal pulse pressure is something between 40 and 60 mm of mercury. That's something like 120 / 80 to 130 / 70 ish.

Past those numbers and you are exceeding 60 mmHg, which is fine. But you have to weigh the risk to benifit ratio for yourself.

Just subtract diastolic from systolic and youll get your pulse pressure. Keep an eye on that as well, a high pulse pressure is also not a good thing.

But one thing that's very much under watched is low diastolic BP. Diastole is produced from rebound after the systole, and it is the period during which your heart attains the oxygen it needs to keep working.

It's a little bit disconcerting to know the true facts on what my values are, but from here I can see what the progression of dilation is, typically it has a tendency to worsen over time. There has been cases where people keep their BP in check for 5 + years and see reversal of left ventricle hypertrophy, but it is rare and requires an entire lifestyle change. Thus my exit from competitive lifting and AAS use.

If you can, get an echo and moniter the dilation as the years go. LDL fraction as above mentioned is a great idea as well. And just watch your blood pressure on the regular, dont take it lightly because that's got to be one of the leading afflictions that men using AAS face, along with liver damage and kidney damage.

Stay on top of checking some biomarkers and keep them in a good range, and you'll have a good run. I really wish I did when I was a bit younger. Now, I'm paying for it haha.

Also, look into adequate potassium intake. It's made a big difference in my numbers.
 
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Serotonin101

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One thing that people don't watch enough is pulse pressure. The difference between your systolic and your diastolic is referred to as your pulse pressure.

A low diastolic can be just as indicative of poor arterial compliance as high systolic BP. I was on gear for a good 10 years and stopped last March because I could feel the damage. Suffice to say I got an echocardiogram and every chamber of my heart is dilated to the upper physiological limit, and I have always sort of had an issue with blood pressure. Typically, my diastolic was high with a low diastolic, and it's definitely an effort for me to keep it in the 120 / 70 range. My normal readings used to be around 140 / 70 - 135 / 65.

What is considered a normal pulse pressure is something between 40 and 60 mm of mercury. That's something like 120 / 80 to 130 / 70 ish.

Past those numbers and you are exceeding 60 mmHg, which is fine. But you have to weigh the risk to benifit ratio for yourself.

Just subtract diastolic from systolic and youll get your pulse pressure. Keep an eye on that as well, a high pulse pressure is also not a good thing.

But one thing that's very much under watched is low diastolic BP. Diastole is produced from rebound after the systole, and it is the period during which your heart attains the oxygen it needs to keep working.

It's a little bit disconcerting to know the true facts on what my values are, but from here I can see what the progression of dilation is, typically it has a tendency to worsen over time. There has been cases where people keep their BP in check for 5 + years and see reversal of left ventricle hypertrophy, but it is rare and requires an entire lifestyle change. Thus my exit from competitive lifting and AAS use.

If you can, get an echo and moniter the dilation as the years go. LDL fraction as above mentioned is a great idea as well. And just watch your blood pressure on the regular, dont take it lightly because that's got to be one of the leading afflictions that men using AAS face, along with liver damage and kidney damage.

Stay on top of checking some biomarkers and keep them in a good range, and you'll have a good run. I really wish I did when I was a bit younger. Now, I'm paying for it haha.

Also, look into adequate potassium intake. It's made a big difference in my numbers.
Where the hell have you been? That was some great info lol
 

Working_Class

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Aug 12, 2019
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Buried in textbooks trying to change my career, and getting well versed in medical literature to see if I may one day be able to revisit my golden years (albeit with a much more cautious and mindful approach). I'm seeing testosterone as something that could be very useful in hormone optimization therapy, after the body's natural production declines enough to warrant it's use. Also under the clinical supervision of a doctor, as they will be able to send you for any diagnostic tests that will help ensure you are on the right track with diet and endocrine balance. HCG is an attractive choice for low T men looking to encourage more endogenous production of this youth preserving hormone. But again, medical supervision is the only way to really know what exactly is changing in an individual's body chemistry.

I do however understand the pitfalls of trying to get a regular doctor on board with this. Private care is the best route. It's priced out at 3500$ / year approximately in Canada. Plus any special tests that arent covered (anti aging athletic male blood panels are about 400 - 500$) In the long run, we spend more money on our cars and trucks than we do on ensuring our good health, and I feel like this is something that needs to change. But, to each their own. If your transmission blows out, you can change it up. But if your heart grows and your arterial plaque builds to a dangerous level, there isn't a lot you can do after the fact. This should make us all stop and think befoe blasting 1200 test, 900 decca for 3 months and 40 mg of dbol for 45 days. Its just a really risky choice. Also, Trenbolone has become so mainstream, and it is by far one of the most harmful AAS, but do you wanna deadlift 700 lbs for reps and clean and press a 335 lbs axle over head or what? It becomes a very emotionally driven choice. And I can appreciate that. Whatever it takes, as they say.

Also, I've been investigating peptide therapy and nootropics fairly extensively. Sourcing custom synths and everything. I am a man on a mission. A mission of science, experimentation and deeper understanding of mathematics, chemestry, physiology, anatomy and the world around us.

Be good to yourself, the realm of self experimentation and exogenous hormone augmentation is an incredibly complex puzzle if we are looking at differences in individual genetics and biochemistry.

One of my greatest intrigues is the use of peptides for various afflictions. It's been proposed that TB500 may be emerging as a potential treatment alongside lifestyle interventions to ameliorate cardiac dilation. This topic is one that I hold dear to my heart (pardon the pun). Being that I suffer from this, I am very interested in the possibilities which the decade in front of me may hold, in terms of undoing some of the damage I did in my 20's. It has also been said that the use of TB500 Is more efficacious when trauma is induced in target tissue prior to administration. This could be in the form of shockwave therapy or prolotherapy, maybe intra articular injections post training. Its all speculation, but the intrigue is present.

Whatever yall do, think about tomorrow while you do whatever you're doing today. The you of the future will thank the you of the past.
 
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