• ✍️ WORDS ✍️

    Welcome Guest!

  • Words Moderators: cduggles | Mysterier
  • Bluelight HOT THREADS
  • Let's Welcome Our NEW MEMBERS!

Social What are you currently reading?

deficiT

Sr. Moderator: TDS, NSADD, S&G
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2011
Messages
7,468
Location
Baltimore, MD
I discovered Stephen King when I was 11. Was on a road trip (well, a holiday, but it was a 14 hour drive there) and saw a copy of IT in the bookstore part of a service station (it featured a sinister clown with glowing eyes reaching out from a storm drain) and I thought it was SO cool. I begged my parents for it but they said no (they were really strick about movies and I guess reading a book for adults, too). On the way back, I finaly convinced my dad and I binged through most of his books over the next several years.
There were a few just weren't horror, or I guess were too long-winded or slow for me at the time.''

I got really back into his books again recently. Currently reading Apt Pupil.
The only Stephen King I've read in it's entirety was The Dark Half. It was really good. I own both The Shining and a newer one called Revival. I am planning on reading them shortly, after I finish American Gods by Neil Gaiman.
 

ChemicallyEnhanced

Bluelighter
Joined
Apr 29, 2018
Messages
6,219
Location
UK
The only Stephen King I've read in it's entirety was The Dark Half. It was really good. I own both The Shining and a newer one called Revival. I am planning on reading them shortly, after I finish American Gods by Neil Gaiman.

The Shining is a CLASSIC, of course. In all honesty, I hated Rivival, but it got good reviews.

If you really wanna read his best, I'd reccommend:

It
Misery
Carrie
'Salems Lot
Pet Semetery
Needful Things
Desperation
Dreamcatcher
The Long Walk


Most of his books are really good, though.
 

izo

Bluelighter
Joined
Mar 22, 2006
Messages
1,197
Location
HHH
ah, pet cementary and misery were the both i read last, werent that great, shining is probably the last one i will read from him. it is really it that stands ouf from his books.
 

ChemicallyEnhanced

Bluelighter
Joined
Apr 29, 2018
Messages
6,219
Location
UK
ah, pet cementary and misery were the both i read last, werent that great, shining is probably the last one i will read from him. it is really it that stands ouf from his books.

Last as in the most recent books you've read, or last as in you read them when they came out and haven't read any of his since?
 

ChemicallyEnhanced

Bluelighter
Joined
Apr 29, 2018
Messages
6,219
Location
UK
I advise you Shane Stevens, i bought two books of him (By Reason of Insanity and The Anvil Chorus if i remember correctly..) which was praised by Stephen King on the 1st.... I don't remember it very well but it's goood shit (y)

Never heard of him, but I'll check him out on Goodreads. Cheers :)
 

ChemicallyEnhanced

Bluelighter
Joined
Apr 29, 2018
Messages
6,219
Location
UK
Finished Apt Pupil last night. Loved it. Really kept me interested the whole time.

Below Deck: Hell or High Water by Matt Shaw came out yesterday so reading that now. He brings out a novella (or sometimes a short story collection or anthology) every month and they're always on KindleUnlimited.

After that I'm reading The Breathing Method.
I read Different Seasons as a teen but for some reason I only read the first and third novellas in it (Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption and The Body). I loved both of those stories, so now that I've loved Apt Pupil as well, I'm quite excited for the final novella in the collection.
 

ChemicallyEnhanced

Bluelighter
Joined
Apr 29, 2018
Messages
6,219
Location
UK
Currently rereading The Long Walk by Stephen King (originally published under "Richard Bachman".
This is probably one of his least known novels (King calls it a novella, but at 349 pages, it's a novel lol) but has always been one of my personal favourites. I read it 14 years ago, so enjoying it just as much the second time around as I only remember a few parts.
Plot-wise: The story is set in the near-future (no specifics are given, which is probably a good thing in terms of not dating the story as it was written in 1971 so the "near-future" is probably in the past now) where once a year there is a gruelling competition called The Long Walk. 100 boys in their late teens must walk 450 miles across America. The winner (if indeed anybody survives) is whomever passes the finish line first. The rules are:
1) The Long Walkers must walk at a pace of at least 4 miles per hour.
2) Dropping below 4 miles per hour gets you a warning. If you remain below 4 miles per hour you will get a second warning 30 seconds later, a third warning 30 seconds after that, and finally 30 seconds after the third warning you will be shot and killed.
3) Walking for one hour without getting any warnings earns you one warning taken away.
4) Trying to run away or refusing to continue gets you shot.

It sounds interesting enough and is actually cooler than it sounds.
 

mal3volent

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 6, 2011
Messages
18,468
Currently rereading The Long Walk by Stephen King (originally published under "Richard Bachman".
This is probably one of his least known novels (King calls it a novella, but at 349 pages, it's a novel lol) but has always been one of my personal favourites. I read it 14 years ago, so enjoying it just as much the second time around as I only remember a few parts.
Plot-wise: The story is set in the near-future (no specifics are given, which is probably a good thing in terms of not dating the story as it was written in 1971 so the "near-future" is probably in the past now) where once a year there is a gruelling competition called The Long Walk. 100 boys in their late teens must walk 450 miles across America. The winner (if indeed anybody survives) is whomever passes the finish line first. The rules are:
1) The Long Walkers must walk at a pace of at least 4 miles per hour.
2) Dropping below 4 miles per hour gets you a warning. If you remain below 4 miles per hour you will get a second warning 30 seconds later, a third warning 30 seconds after that, and finally 30 seconds after the third warning you will be shot and killed.
3) Walking for one hour without getting any warnings earns you one warning taken away.
4) Trying to run away or refusing to continue gets you shot.

It sounds interesting enough and is actually cooler than it sounds.

One of the first "adult" books I remember toting around was The Bachman Books which contained Rage, The Long Walk, Road Work, and The Running Man.

I was in eighth grade at the time, about to be a freshman, so Rage had this indescribable almost existential effect on me. The Long Walk was super entertaining but not as personal as Rage.

My brother got me into his short stories. Reading anything much longer is very challenging for me. I get lost in my head and can't keep track. So the short stories and novellas are perfect for me.
 

ChemicallyEnhanced

Bluelighter
Joined
Apr 29, 2018
Messages
6,219
Location
UK
One of the first "adult" books I remember toting around was The Bachman Books which contained Rage, The Long Walk, Road Work, and The Running Man.

I was in eighth grade at the time, about to be a freshman, so Rage had this indescribable almost existential effect on me. The Long Walk was super entertaining but not as personal as Rage.

My brother got me into his short stories. Reading anything much longer is very challenging for me. I get lost in my head and can't keep track. So the short stories and novellas are perfect for me.

I liked Rage, too. Shame it's out of print now (it was in The Bachman Books when I first bought it in 2004ish, but I bought the book again last week as I had lost that and it is not in there). I remember King saying something about a school shooting happening where the shooter later admitted to have reading Rage "about twelve times".
 

ChemicallyEnhanced

Bluelighter
Joined
Apr 29, 2018
Messages
6,219
Location
UK
Recently finished re-reading American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis - 5 Returned Video Tapes (out of 5)
Fuck, I love this book (the movie is amazing, tambien).
Funny, disturbing and brilliantly satirical of 80s culture.

I usually only do "top quotes" for movie reviews but this just has too many great ones to NOT do it:

“...there is an idea of a Patrick Bateman, some kind of abstraction, but there is no real me, only an entity, something illusory, and though I can hide my cold gaze and you can shake my hand and feel flesh gripping yours and maybe you can even sense our lifestyles are probably comparable: I simply am not there.”

"Is evil something you are, or is it something you do?"

"I have to return some video tapes" (repeated)

"I like to dissect girls. Did you know I'm utterly insane?"

“There’s no use in denying it: this has been a bad week. I’ve started drinking my own urine.”


"I had all the characteristics of a human being—flesh, blood, skin, hair—but my depersonalization was so intense, had gone so deep, that my normal ability to feel compassion had been eradicated, the victim of a slow, purposeful erasure. I was simply imitating reality, a rough resemblance of a human being, with only a dim corner of my mind functioning”

"All it comes down to is this. I feel like shit but look great".

"It is hard for me to make sense on any given level. Myself is fabricated, an aberration. I am a noncontingent human being. My personality is sketchy and unformed, my heartlessness goes deep and is persistent. My conscience, my pity, my hopes disappeared a long time ago (probably at Harvard) if they ever did exist. There are no more barriers to cross. All I have in common with the uncontrollable and the insane, the vicious and the evil, all the mayhem I have caused and my utter indifference toward it, I have now surpassed. I still, though, hold on to one single bleak truth: no one is safe, nothing is redeemed. Yet I am blameless. Each model of human behavior must be assumed to have some validity. Is evil something you are? Or is it something you do? My pain is constant and sharp and I do not hope for a better world for anyone. In fact, I want my pain to be inflicted on others. I want no one to escape. But even after admitting this—and I have countless times, in just about every act I’ve committed—and coming face-to-face with these truths, there is no catharsis. I gain no deeper knowledge about myself, no new understanding can be extracted from my telling. There has been no reason for me to tell you any of this. This confession has meant nothing….”
 

neversickanymore

Moderator: DS, CD
Staff member
Joined
Jan 23, 2013
Messages
25,740
Location
babysitting the argument in my head
If you really wanna read his best, I'd reccommend:

It
Misery
Carrie
'Salems Lot
Pet Semetery
Needful Things
Desperation
Dreamcatcher
The Long Walk


Most of his books are really good, though.

The Stand and the entire Gunslinger series are of two of my favorite reads over my life time and I read pretty variously.
 

MydriHaze

Bluelighter
Joined
Mar 18, 2016
Messages
3,140
Location
Lost my keys..
I tried American Psycho but i found the narration to heavy in all the détails the author gives.

Otherwise, i currently reading Le Chinois du XIVème, written in french by Melvin Van Peebles and illustrated by Roland Topor :cool:
 
Top