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hydroazuanacaine

bluelighter
Joined
May 17, 2007
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8,234
what are some good novels you’d classify as pop? like Fight Club, Goodbye Columbus, and American Psycho? bonus points if the author is female. thanks!
 

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Bluelighter
Joined
Jun 10, 2017
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2,590
Location
Le Kitchen, Shan State
I lost my entire collection of books. Only thing that's left is a bunch of Robert anton wilson, which I grew very bored of halfway thru each book during a bout of discordian obsession :'(
Man, that is such heavy sorrow, losing books. I had to ditch three or four moving boxes a few years ago, and some of the books I had, are out of print and I can't find any fucking copies. Losing my books was worse than losing my job. I can't cry at funerals, but I honestly wept when I realized those were gone.
 

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Bluelighter
Joined
Jun 10, 2017
Messages
2,590
Location
Le Kitchen, Shan State
what are some good novels you’d classify as pop? like Fight Club, Goodbye Columbus, and American Psycho? bonus points if the author is female. thanks!
I call it transgressive fiction, but tomato/tomto.
I haven't found that many female authors roaming those waters, which is a fucking shame.

Here are some suggestions;

"Geek Love" by Katherine Dunn - it was excellent. I haven't read it in a while, but I remember enjoying it immensely.

"Grotesque" by Natsuo Kirino. Two sisters grow up to be prostitutes and murdered by the same man. Cults and dense darkness.

"My Year of Rest and Relaxation" by Ottessa Moshfegh to have a slight "Less Than Zero"-feel to it, although not as cold and callous.
"Eileen" by her was very much more Bret Easton Ellis.

The Phineas Poe-trilogy ('Kiss Me, Judas', 'Penny Dreadful', 'Hells Half Acre') by Will Christopher Baer. Just. Amazing.

"The Contortionists Handbook" by Craig Clevenger - like Chuck and Craig spends a weekend on coke and roofies
and decides to write a book about genius larency.

"Bright Lights, Big City" by Jay McInerney. He got in Ellis shadow, but that book is so good.

"Knock'emstiff" by Donald Ray Pollock - mud and blood.

"The Ones That Got Away" by Stephen Graham Jones- short story collection with sentences that will tie intestines into knots.

"Filth" by Irvine Welsh, which became a movie as well not long ago, is brillant - corrupt, lewd cop on drugs, mindfucking coworkers
and regular fucking anything that moves.

"The Fuck-Up" by Arthur Nersesian - dark humour, utterly depraved and decadent. Fantastic.
"Suicide Casanova" by him is also really good, if you don't mind a bit of sadistic eroticism.

That's what I can come up with now at least.
 

neversickanymore

Moderator: DS, CD
Staff member
Joined
Jan 23, 2013
Messages
25,576
Location
babysitting the argument in my head
I still have yet to find my matriarch both in life and in letters .. she is out there.. can’t wait

On Pills and Needles by Rick Van Warner. A really solid take here.

Thirty Days a Black Man by Bill Steigerwald Gets to the real deal by the real deal
 

Burnt Offerings

Bluelighter
Joined
Jan 18, 2010
Messages
5,427
Location
USA
Bartleby the Skrivener Melville

This is a story that a lot of left wingers are familiar with for some reason. Zizek and Negri are two I know for sure did commentaries on it, plus others who I can’t remember. It gets referenced frequently in left wing writings/discourse.

Personally I like it...but I definitely think it’s a story one can draw multiple interpretations from. Melville was a pretty good author but didn’t really make shit as an author during his life, in fact he basically died a pauper and only became famous decades after his death


My year of rest and relaxation by Ottessa Moshfegh.

Is this one actually good? I remember reading about it and thinking the premise sounded interesting, but also thought that it may have come off as the druggie ramblings of a pretentious hipster and decided against investigating further
 

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Bluelighter
Joined
Jun 10, 2017
Messages
2,590
Location
Le Kitchen, Shan State
Is this one actually good? I remember reading about it and thinking the premise sounded interesting, but also thought that it may have come off as the druggie ramblings of a pretentious hipster and decided against investigating further
Plot wise, pretty flat - some interesting characters, but if you like stories propelled forward by action, not monologues and talk, it might bore you.
The protagonist has a fucked up psychiatrist that prescribes like russian RC-drugs not yet allowed, but she writes them out anyway.
So she does drugs in an attempt to hibernate for a year, or the better part; she gets blackouts, she sleep-walks, she is utterly shameless and
apathetic, broken and slathered with antipathy.

I like the way Ottessa writes. She's got that tinge of Ellis with the disillusionment from "Less Than Zero" / "Rules of Attraction" / "The Informers".
She's not as crude and blunt, but she describes that feeling of capitulation and surrender when facing life, the hopelessness of privilege.

"the druggie ramblings of a pretentious hipster" - I can't argue that this isn't completely wrong, but I found it quite interesting.
I like fucked-up and damaged people in my books. This girl, she's broken. I read it in one go, so it's not exactly a time consuming endeavor.

I'd say, if you like the earlier mentioned Ellis books and his whole niche, especially his early stuff, it's worth a couple of hours.

But "Eileen" was much better by her. If you haven't read "Geek Love" yet, I highly recommend that one aboved "My Year.." and "Eileen".
 

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Bluelighter
Joined
Jun 10, 2017
Messages
2,590
Location
Le Kitchen, Shan State
@hydroazuanacaine
Ah, shit - I forgot Vladimir Sorokin. His dystopian novel "Day of the Oprichnik" is fucking brilliant, not to mention "Blue Lard", which shot him into infamy for its pornographic scene between Josef Stalin and Nikita Khrushchev - yes, old, dead Stalin lives in this novel, Dostojevskij too.
I'm surprised he didn't die in some kind of "accident" during this turbulent period.

Fantastic author. He really pushes the boundaries of the written word into physical sensations at times, much like Palahniuk, even if their themes differ.
 

MydriHaze

Bluelighter
Joined
Mar 18, 2016
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2,632
Location
Lost my keys..
Joko Fête Son Anniversaire, by Roland Topor

An absurd tale about work, family, money, love, and a fall into the hell from the riches and powerfulls, by the master of dark humor
 

Skorpio

Bluelighter
Joined
May 11, 2011
Messages
754
Location
The zone
Is this one actually good? I remember reading about it and thinking the premise sounded interesting, but also thought that it may have come off as the druggie ramblings of a pretentious hipster and decided against investigating further
I really enjoyed it, found it brimming with absolutely dark humor. Especially her (poor) relationship with her friend Reva.

Just read Peace by Gene Wolf with the assistance of a book club. Really does a neat thing being a memoir of a very unreliable narrator. It comes off as very plain albeit nonlinear initially, but then you get a hint of some of the darker currents beneath his story and it becomes quite haunting.

I started Tunnel by William Gass a while ago but stopped because I was in low spirits at the time, and that book really just made me feel awful. I want to finish it now that I am more shored up mentally these days.
 
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hydroazuanacaine

bluelighter
Joined
May 17, 2007
Messages
8,234
It is bitter for the young to see what awful innocence adults grow into, that terrible vulnerability that must be sheltered from the rodent mire of child.
 

ChemicallyEnhanced

Bluelighter
Joined
Apr 29, 2018
Messages
6,063
Location
UK
I discovered Stephen King when I was 11. Was on a road trip (well, a holiday, but it was a 14 hour drive there) and saw a copy of IT in the bookstore part of a service station (it featured a sinister clown with glowing eyes reaching out from a storm drain) and I thought it was SO cool. I begged my parents for it but they said no (they were really strick about movies and I guess reading a book for adults, too). On the way back, I finaly convinced my dad and I binged through most of his books over the next several years.
There were a few just weren't horror, or I guess were too long-winded or slow for me at the time.''

I got really back into his books again recently. Currently reading Apt Pupil.
 
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