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mdx92129

Bluelighter
Joined
May 27, 2020
Messages
111
Just finished A Scanner Darkly by PKD, almost finished my companion book to it, The Naked Ape by Desmond Morris.
 

mdx92129

Bluelighter
Joined
May 27, 2020
Messages
111
Finished Descartes' Meditations this morning, about 1/5th of the way through Varieties of Religious Experience by William James.
Also, what is everyone's favourite reading position? I almost exclusively read whilst laying down vertically, although doing this, coupled with an extended lockdown, hasn't done my cardiac rhythms much good since I'm in a position of lateral immobility for a good chunk of the day and tend to use some phenidate bi-weekly. Any novel suggestions?
 

jimdron

Bluelighter
Joined
Dec 28, 2017
Messages
267
Location
Vienna, Austria-Hungary
Lighter than my Shadow by Katie Green. Graphic novel about anorexia experience by the author. It is superb. https://lighterthanmyshadow.com

Ending (I finished it today) is very ambivalent - author did not describe her emotional environment while being very young kid (under 4), but ends with Katie in her twenties looking at Katie at 3-4 years old. Looking with compassion and sadness. While otherwise her anorexia is described as rootless, coming from nowhere.

I am currently "hooked" on childhood trauma and I looking for it everywhere, but it is interesting that in this comic author "avoids" it but still ends with it.
 

deficiT

Moderator: DC, TDS, NSADD
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2011
Messages
3,472
Location
The Belly of The Beast
I'm currently reading Eknath Easwarans three translations of the classics of Indian spirituality, The Upanishads, The Bhagavad Gita, and The Dhammapada.
 
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birdup.snaildown

Bluelighter
Joined
Nov 5, 2020
Messages
1,723
Location
Formerly ForEverAfter
A Christmas Carol - Dickens.

It occurred to me about halfway through this beautiful novel that it is wildly anti Semitic. I have been doing a 10km walk every day, so I was half reading it and half listening to it on tape. Anyway, I kept walking past a church with the name Ebenezer plastered all over it, which seemed odd. Something didn't sit right with me about it. But, I kept walking and listening. I kept reading. And then it struck me. Ebenezer is a word from the Bible. It is in the Old Testament. It is part of the Hebrew Bible, the book of Prophets (Nevi'im).

I don't know how many adaptations I've seen and read of A Christmas Carol. It is one of the most recycled narratives in all of Western literature. But, beyond that, you have all the film and TV stuff including Bill Murray's wickedly underrated "Scrooged"... and I've seriously seen two televised Ducktales adaptations.

So why is it significant that Ebenezer is a Hebrew word?

Well, let's break it down.

Ebenezer Scrooge is a banker, who is obsessed with money (like good old Uncle Scrooge in Ducktales). Dickens describes his nose as long and pointy. He is a joyless, Godless man. He is driven by the almighty dollar... and he hates Christmas. The surname, Scrooge, is fictional. It's not a Jewish name. But his ghostly partner - Jacob Marley - also sports a Jewish name. Jacob means follower (or to follow) and Marley means high tower. Marley lived his life as a ruthless banker, indifferent to the people beneath him. The ghost of Marley is forced to roam the earth as a ghost, damned to purgatory. He visits Scrooge (who is "indistinguishable" from him) and warns him of his wicked ways.

It is not until Scrooge - the pointy nosed, materialistic banker who hates Christmas - embraces Christ that he is redeemed.

I've gone on this journey so many times with Dickens and I've never noticed the incredibly blatant anti Semitic tone. Granted, it's probably easier to distance myself from it when Scrooge is played by Bill Murray and his name is Frank Cross... or when the story revolves around an animated Scottish duck.

But, why haven't I heard of this before?
I studied literature, for fucks sake!

After discovering it - and Googling it - it appears as if practically nobody has put the pieces together. Either that or we have Michael Jackson syndrome. The novel is so great - it actually made me cry - that we don't care if it's wildly anti Semitic. Numerous Jewish scholars have defended Dickens.

I must say, I'm a little torn.

I love the book, but maybe that makes me a Nazi?
 

Burnt Offerings

Bluelighter
Joined
Jan 18, 2010
Messages
5,167
Location
USA
^ that's interesting, I've never seen anyone draw an antisemitic connection to that particular story (or Dickens in general) before. Out of curiosity, I went to the Christmas Carol wiki page and searched for the key words "jew" and "antisemitism" and got nada.

You should flesh it out a bit more, it sounds like a potentially groundbreaking interpretation!
 

MsDiz

Moderator: DS
Staff member
Joined
Mar 31, 2020
Messages
5,126
Location
Ireland
The Art of Hunting Humans by Sidney Mazzi Great book and I agree with much of its content and love how it was presented.

Disinformation by Ion Mihai Pacepa Really revealing

Dark Teritory by Fred Kaplan Great book well written, really informative and also scary
Ohhh, I have my copy of The art of hunting humans always laying around somewhere handy. I read and reread it a lot. Very good in my opinion.

Have started and stopped Disinformation so many times. I will get around to it eventually!

I am currently reading

Jon Ronson’s The psychopathy test. A journey through the madness industry.
Have to say it took me a while to enjoy the humour but I am loving it now.
 

ageingpartyfiend

Bluelighter
Joined
Mar 5, 2011
Messages
2,249
Reading "Drug use for Grown-Ups" by Dr Carl Hart atm - well dipping in and out of it would be a better description.

Disappointing for me. Am not at all enamoured with his writing style and find his cultural observations quite dull and his drug glorification quite inane. I imagine it might be interesting for someone who has only recently begun to consider the topic, perhaps.
 

MsDiz

Moderator: DS
Staff member
Joined
Mar 31, 2020
Messages
5,126
Location
Ireland
Reading "Drug use for Grown-Ups" by Dr Carl Hart atm - well dipping in and out of it would be a better description.

Disappointing for me. Am not at all enamoured with his writing style and find his cultural observations quite dull and his drug glorification quite inane. I imagine it might be interesting for someone who has only recently begun to consider the topic, perhaps.
Ugh lord, I couldn’t even finish it. Dislike Dr Hart immensely!
 

Burnt Offerings

Bluelighter
Joined
Jan 18, 2010
Messages
5,167
Location
USA
I've been reading this book called "Hitler's Table-Talk" recently, for a research project.

Adolf Hitler wrote two books, the well known "Mein Kampf" and the less well known "Zweite Buch" ("Second Book"), which wasn't published during his lifetime. But there was also a compilation of talks, many of which were transcribed by Hitler's secretary and others, that forms the basis of "Hitler's Table-Talk" (there has been some controversy about the way the document was compiled and translated but it's generally considered to be authentic). In it, Hitler expounds on a variety of subjects...many of them are boring, long-winded monologues about niche topics that Hitler was interested in (he was a great public speaker and was really good at haranguing the masses & frothing the people up but he just never came across well on the printed page IMO)...a lot of content (from what I've read so far) about religion and foreign policy, plans related to the war etc...and of course there's some of Hitler's familiar preoccupations sprinkled in, an obsession with race, the Jews, etc.

I've been looking in it for commentary related to the early rise of the Nazi movement in Germany & Nazi economic theories (the topic I'm researching) and I've gotten a few good bits so far.

 

December Flower

Bluelighter
Joined
Oct 22, 2020
Messages
960
I've been reading this book called "Hitler's Table-Talk" recently, for a research project.

Adolf Hitler wrote two books, the well known "Mein Kampf" and the less well known "Zweite Buch" ("Second Book"), which wasn't published during his lifetime. But there was also a compilation of talks, many of which were transcribed by Hitler's secretary and others, that forms the basis of "Hitler's Table-Talk" (there has been some controversy about the way the document was compiled and translated but it's generally considered to be authentic). In it, Hitler expounds on a variety of subjects...many of them are boring, long-winded monologues about niche topics that Hitler was interested in (he was a great public speaker and was really good at haranguing the masses & frothing the people up but he just never came across well on the printed page IMO)...a lot of content (from what I've read so far) about religion and foreign policy, plans related to the war etc...and of course there's some of Hitler's familiar preoccupations sprinkled in, an obsession with race, the Jews, etc.

I've been looking in it for commentary related to the early rise of the Nazi movement in Germany & Nazi economic theories (the topic I'm researching) and I've gotten a few good bits so far.

Haha, don't remind me :D Hitler's writing was so bad, dunno about the translations, but the originals are fucking hilarious.

I think much of his "appeal" back then came from the Austrian accent(which sounds kinda cute to Germans, like a gay Bavarian), and the whole body language. Hitler is all voice and body language. Very interesting to watch the nuanced, strategic movements.

In order to not derail:
I'm reading Das Ich und das Es (1923) by Sigmund Freud
 
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