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Coffeeshroom

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@Coffeeshroom Who is the author of the book you are reading ?

There are a few books covering the material.
The one im reading is called

The Book OF Giants - reconstruction, based on biblical text. No author name or such but anymore suggestions would be appricaiate. Just finihsed reading the Nook of Enoch in a view different views so this was next on my list. Trying to get hold of all the books left out the bible
 

Cheshire_Kat

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Ah, I think I know the material you are referring to, or at least the source. It was a Gnostic Society Library issue, and is also available on the internet, correct?
I read a few books and some other material a long time ago when I was studying at University, but the books are not generally available anymore. The reason I asked was that I was also interested in re-reading the material and was trying to gain some additional information.
 

Coffeeshroom

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Ah, I think I know the material you are referring to, or at least the source. It was a Gnostic Society Library issue, and is also available on the internet, correct?
I read a few books and some other material a long time ago when I was studying at University, but the books are not generally available anymore. The reason I asked was that I was also interested in re-reading the material and was trying to gain some additional information.
Same here, just wont to broaden my knowledge on these specific books but like you mentioned they hard to come by. If you have any books you think i should read or sites where i can get more info i would appreciate it, you can PM me too if you want
 

Psycho_Logic

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Jul 20, 2020
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Trying to find my self but unable so far.
Ernest Becker - The Denial of Death

I can see why this book was so popular when it first came out within psychology profession. But it is kind of dry with no real new value for me personally. I think that I have already absorbed most of lessons that this book brings to the table from other sources in the past. Worth to read just to meditate death for a while if one is avoiding that subject.
 

Hannah Capps

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Jan 29, 2006
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Same here, just wont to broaden my knowledge on these specific books but like you mentioned they hard to come by. If you have any books you think i should read or sites where i can get more info i would appreciate it, you can PM me too if you want
I’d recommend you look up Steve Quale’s books on giants and like subjects. Very good and well researched author.
 

jimdron

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Dec 28, 2017
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Vienna, Austria-Hungary
Finished "Hungry Ghosts" by Gabor Mate - probably the best of all "understanding addiction" books. I read, I think, 6-7 of them. Trying out another book by the same author about ADHD (I have it).

He is doctor working daily with hardcore addicts in Vancouver's Portland Hotel area, where safe injection site is located. Book is half addicts stories, half author's theorizing.

Wha is also surprising is that almost all addicts are one heroin and cocaine, it was written in around 2008, I think.
 
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Burnt Offerings

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Jan 18, 2010
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The Road to Wigan Pier by George Orwell. I did not know that Orwell was an empirical cop for England for years and this lead to his awareness and disillusionment of the criminal means used by the "powerful" to continually exploit the masses. His views on Socialism and the struggle it faces are still deeply relevant today. I'm certainly going to read his work about his cop days.

I scrapped The God of Small Things as It was well written, just not my cup of tea.

I remember reading a piece of writing that Orwell did a while back (I think it may have even been "Road to Wigan Pier"...?) that I thought was quite good.

IIRC part of Wigan Pier was a description of the English working class and the kind of issues they had to deal with, but another part was a more abstract (but compelling) description of the future. Orwell said that, in the future, our industrial technology/capacity and automation would become so advanced that machines would do basically everything for us. No one would have a job because machines do everything now. Orwell said that, at first glance, this situation looks deceptively appealing...after all, human beings would have endless amounts of free time now that they've overcome scarcity and the brute struggle for survival in the job market. But he actually took a contradictory view, arguing that this absence of useful purpose would drive humanity into the very depths of depression, magnifying the existential pain that lurks in the background (or foreground) of our lives.

It was a very interesting and disturbing line of argument that I feel was quite ahead of its time. George Orwell was kind of an interesting and complex historical figure. Overall I'd group him in with more conservative left-wing schools of thought, but he also wrote a classic book ("Homage to Catalonia") about one of the most vibrant and radical left-wing movements in Europe during his life, the CNT in Spain. I've seen a lot of right-wing individuals utilize his quotes or segments from his books like "1984" or "Animal Farm", which are widely regarded as being critiques of Stalinism or communism more generally...and yet he was a self-described socialist with quite a few anarchist/communist friends. Regardless of anything else, he suffered a near-fatal gunshot wound while fighting against fascism in Spain...if he had done nothing else in his life, that would've been enough to earn my respect.
 

neversickanymore

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babysitting the argument in my head
The Green Berets: The Amazing Story of the U.S. Army's Elite Special Forces Unit
By: Robin Moore

Defying Jihad: The Dramatic True Story of a Woman Who Volunteered to Kill Infidels - and Then Faced Death for Becoming One
By: Esther Ahmad , Craig Borlase

Interesting and scary reading the thoughts of a natural extremists.. what a sheep

Searching for Bobby Fischer
By: Fred Waitzkin

He was brilliant but quite the freak, glad I don't struggle with his demons.

Dopefiend
By: Donald Goines

Trout Fishing in America: A Novel
By: Richard Brautigan

enjoyed this lit greatly

No Promises in the Wind
by: Irene Hunt

V enjoyable.. nice work
 

tubgirl.jpg

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candymountain
I never read just one book at a time. I have books at strategic places so I always have something to read. I can't even take a shit without having to read something.

Bedroom-book; "Kiss Me, Judas" - Will Christopher Baer

Bathroom-book; "Denial of Death" - Ernest Becker

Kitchen-book; "Tropic of Cancer" - Henry Miller

Backpack-book; "The Flowers of Evil" - Charles Baudelaire
 

tubgirl.jpg

Bluelighter
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Jun 10, 2017
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candymountain
Update;

Bedroom-book; "Against Nature" - J.-K. Huysmans

Kitchen-book; "Att Hata Allt Mänskligt Liv" - Nikanor Teratologen
("To Hate All Human Life")
 

MsDiz

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I never read just one book at a time. I have books at strategic places so I always have something to read. I can't even take a shit without having to read something.

Bedroom-book; "Kiss Me, Judas" - Will Christopher Baer

Bathroom-book; "Denial of Death" - Ernest Becker

Kitchen-book; "Tropic of Cancer" - Henry Miller

Backpack-book; "The Flowers of Evil" - Charles Baudelaire
Les Fleurs du mal is definitely an interesting read.
 

D's

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( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡° )
I've been wanting to read this book for sometime,
It is banned in jails and prisons all over the world, and wanted to figure out why. So after reading a little bit, I understand why the book can be harmful in incarceration situations.

Here is a TL;DR picture of a brief introduction into the 48 Laws of Power:

It is a really interesting read, and coming from me who seems to have issues with the general public I think it has helped me open my eyes to just 'cookie cutter' views on a single subject. There is way more for me to learn, and I agree with almost everything that I've read so far.
 

tubgirl.jpg

Bluelighter
Joined
Jun 10, 2017
Messages
1,567
Location
candymountain
I've been wanting to read this book for sometime,
It is banned in jails and prisons all over the world, and wanted to figure out why. So after reading a little bit, I understand why the book can be harmful in incarceration situations.

Here is a TL;DR picture of a brief introduction into the 48 Laws of Power:

It's an amazing book, indeed. Very useful.
It is a really interesting read, and coming from me who seems to have issues with the general public I think it has helped me open my eyes to just 'cookie cutter' views on a single subject. There is way more for me to learn, and I agree with almost everything that I've read so far.
 

neversickanymore

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Jan 23, 2013
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babysitting the argument in my head
Poisoner and Chief Steven Kinzer.

Details and describes the CIAs criminal activities around mind control. The US basically picked up right where the Nazi and Japanese left off at the end of WW2 often employing those scientists. In the name of defending the US and world from communism they were permitted and did awful things that resulted in death and the destroyed minds of innocent people in horrific ways. Shits still going on.

good book
 
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