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News TRAUMA | +40 articles | How Psychedelics Saved My Life

AutoTripper

Bluelighter
Joined
Feb 28, 2019
Messages
6,036
@mr peabody Hi my friend. Still at it can you believe. 1800 micrograms now. Full regukar witts about me. Drinking some fine Fijian Kava for nerves before organic sungrown 3 month cured Sativa weed vaporized.

What a life hey. Hope you are feeling well.
 

AutoTripper

Bluelighter
Joined
Feb 28, 2019
Messages
6,036
You're amazing. My hero.
Thank you, your support means and helps so much.

I'm quite lost for words. I put my neck right out there arguing very controversial unordinary and unpolular here views and theories of Cvid.

I need to abandon that pursuit now, it's futile.

Some people eventually can be so nasty, it's too easy to spin into a bad trip and deep depression.

I'm annoyed at myself but it's a lesson and inspiration to move on.

2200 Micrograms will do me now. Just focussing on calming nerves, restoring good mood.

Often, I hit spells having to fight for a positive outlook for hours, I've always dug it out.

It's really important to do that too. I'm on it now. I did take more acid after my mood switched, as new injection was worthwhile, and a big dose of Instant Kava just before typing.
 

mr peabody

Moderator: Music Discussion, PM
Staff member
Joined
Aug 31, 2016
Messages
5,295
Location
Frostbite Falls, MN
Thank you, your support means and helps so much.

I'm quite lost for words. I put my neck right out there arguing very controversial unordinary and unpolular here views and theories of Cvid.

I need to abandon that pursuit now, it's futile.

Some people eventually can be so nasty, it's too easy to spin into a bad trip and deep depression.

I'm annoyed at myself but it's a lesson and inspiration to move on.

2200 Micrograms will do me now. Just focussing on calming nerves, restoring good mood.

Often, I hit spells having to fight for a positive outlook for hours, I've always dug it out.

It's really important to do that too. I'm on it now. I did take more acid after my mood switched, as new injection was worthwhile, and a big dose of Instant Kava just before typing.
I've learned to never engage with nasty people. Never let anyone disrupt your space. It's sacrosanct. 🙏
 

AutoTripper

Bluelighter
Joined
Feb 28, 2019
Messages
6,036
I've learned to never engage with nasty people. Never let anyone disrupt your space. It's sacrosanct. 🙏
That's wise. This is the way the internet can be more emotionally dangerous than real life, you never know what's coming.

I place myself in a real glass house. I'll look to protect my own better from now on.

It's a duty I cannot shirk, to wake humanity up. I've put every thing into that since ever.

I really don't need to do any more there. It's fascinating and mindblowing what is really occuring here, but too much for MSM Govt obeying programmed minds to grasp.

I'll put some afternoon music on soon if my mum takes our dog for a walk, it's sunny, I'll stay home I need space. Thank you.
 

mr peabody

Moderator: Music Discussion, PM
Staff member
Joined
Aug 31, 2016
Messages
5,295
Location
Frostbite Falls, MN



MDMA therapy achieves an astounding 76% success rate for treating PTSD

by Rich Haridy | NEW ATLAS | 1 Nov 2018

Newly published results from a Phase 2 clinical trial into the efficacy of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy in treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have revealed striking success, with 76 percent of subjects not meeting the standard clinical criteria for PTSD 12 months after receiving the treatment.

This latest study is one of six key Phase 2 clinical trials that were used to last year convince the FDA to grant the landmark MDMA-assisted treatment a Breakthrough Therapy Designation. This particular trial, sponsored by the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), was conducted in Boulder, Colorado and led by psychotherapist Marcela Ot'alora.

The trial comprised 28 subjects, all with clinically diagnosed PTSD that had persisted for an average of almost 30 years, despite attempts with other conventional treatments, including drugs and psychotherapy. The structure of the treatment resembled the model established by MAPS in other trials: two day-long MDMA treatment sessions followed by integrative therapy sessions. A third MDMA session was also offered to evaluate whether that improved long-term responses compared to two sessions.

Responses to the treatment were evaluated using the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS-IV), the current best standard for PTSD assessment. Here the results were nothing less than spectacular. On enrolment the average CAPS-IV score of each participant was 92, and at a follow-up 12 months after the final MDMA session, the average CAPS-IV score was just 31. A remarkable 76 percent of participants, after 12 months, did not meet the clinical diagnostic criteria for PTSD.

These impressive results bode well for the long-term staying power of the treatment, with the average CAPS-IV score dropping an additional 9.6 points from the point the treatment finished to the 12-month follow-up.

The final stage before MDMA for PTSD can become an FDA-approved treatment is expansive Phase 3 trials. These trials kicked off in September 2018, after a slight delay in producing and encapsulating the MDMA needed to conduct the experiments. Encompassing between 200 and 300 subjects across 16 different sites in the US, Canada and Israel, it should take up to two years to complete this final stage, with ultimate FDA approval on track for sometime in 2021 if all goes well.

https://newatlas.com/mdma-ptsd-successful-trial-results/57074/
 

mr peabody

Moderator: Music Discussion, PM
Staff member
Joined
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Messages
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Location
Frostbite Falls, MN



How psychedelics saved my life: My experience with anxiety and PTSD

I was drawn to journalism at a young age by the desire to provide a voice for the ‘little guy’. For nearly a decade working as a CNN investigative correspondent and independent journalist, I became a mouthpiece for the oppressed, the victimized, the marginalized. My path of submersion journalism brought me closest to the plight of my sources, by re-living the story to get a true understanding of what was happening.

After several years of reporting, I realized an unfortunate consequence of my style - I had immersed myself too deeply in the trauma and suffering of the people I’d interviewed. I began to have trouble sleeping as their faces appeared in my darkest dreams. I spent too long absorbed in a world of despair and my inability to deflect it allowed the trauma of others to settle inside my mind and being. Combine that with several violent experiences while working in the field and I was at my worst. A life spent reporting on the edge had led me to the brink of my own sanity.

Because I could not find a way to process my anguish, it grew into a monster, manifesting itself in a constant state of anxiety, short-term memory loss and sleeplessness. Heart palpitations made me feel like I was knocking on death’s door.

Why I chose psychedelic medicines

Prescription medications and antidepressants serve a purpose, but I knew they weren't for me. I first heard of the healing powers of psychedelics as a guest on the Joe Rogan Experience podcast. Joe told me that psychedelic mushrooms transformed his life and had the potential to change the course of humanity for the better. My initial reaction was one of amusement and somewhat disbelief, but the seed was planted.

Psychedelics were an odd choice for someone like me. I grew up in the Midwest and was fed 30 years of propaganda about how bad these substances were. You can imagine my surprise when, after the Rogan podcast, I found so many articles and studies on the prodigious medicinal effects of these substances… and the examples of how we’ve been misled by authorities who classify psychedelics as Schedule 1 narcotics with ‘no medicinal value’ despite dozens of scientific studies proving otherwise.

Tripping around the world

Having only ever smoked the odd marijuana joint in college, in March 2013 I found myself boarding a plane to Iquitos, Peru to try one of the most powerful psychedelics on earth. I ditched my car at the airport, packed my belongings in a backpack and headed down to the Amazon jungle placing my blind faith in a substance that a week earlier I could hardly pronounce: Ayahuasca.

Ayahuasca is a medicinal tea that contains the psychedelic compound dimethyltryptamine, or DMT. The brew is rapidly spreading around the world after numerous anecdotes have shown the brew has the power to cure anxiety, PTSD,depression, unexplained pain, and numerous physical and mental health ailments. Studies of long-term ayahuasca drinkers show they are less likely to face addictions and have elevated levels of serotonin, the neurotransmitter responsible for happiness.

If I had any reservations, doubts, or disbeliefs, they were quickly expelled shortly after my first ayahuasca experience. The foul-tasting tea vibrated through my veins and into my brain as the medicine scanned my body. My field of vision became engulfed with colors and geometric patterns. Then I saw a vision of a brick wall. The word ‘anxiety’ was spray painted in large letters on the wall. “You must heal your anxiety,” the medicine whispered. I entered a dream-like state where traumatic memories were finally dislodged from my subconscious.

It was as if I was viewing a film of my entire life, not as the emotional me, but as an objective observer. The vividly introspective movie played in my mind as I relived my most painful scenes - my parents divorce when I was just 4 years-old, past relationships, being shot at by police while photographing a protest in Anaheim, and crushed underneath a crowd while photographing a protest in Chicago. Ayahuasca enabled me to reprocess these events, detaching the fear and emotion from the memories. The experience was akin to ten years of therapy in one eight-hour ayahuasca session.

But the experience was terrifying at times. Ayahuasca is not for everyone - you have to be willing to revisit some very dark places and surrender to the uncontrollable, fierce flow of the medicine. Ayahuasca also causes violent vomiting and diarrhea, which shamans call “getting well” because you are purging trauma from your body.

After seven ayahuasca sessions in the jungles of Peru, the fog that engulfed my mind lifted. I was able to sleep again and noticed improvements in my memory and less anxiety. I yearned to absorb as much knowledge as possible about these medicines and spent the next year traveling the world in search of more healers, teachers and experiences through submersion journalism.

I was drawn to try psilocybin mushrooms after reading how they reduced anxiety in terminal cancer patients. The ayahuasca showed me my main ailment was anxiety, and I knew I still had work to do to fix it. Psilocybin mushrooms are not neurotoxic, nonaddictive, and studies show they reduce anxiety, depression, and even lead to neurogenesis, or the regrowth of brain cells. Why would governments worldwide keep such a profound fungi out of the reach of their people?

After Peru, I visited curanderas, or healers, in Oaxaca, Mexico. The Mazatecs have used psilocybin mushrooms as a sacrament and medicinally for hundreds of years. Curandera Dona Augustine served me a leaf full of mushrooms during a beautiful ceremony before a Catholic alter. As she sang thousand year-old songs, I watched the sunset over the mountainous landscape in Oaxaca and a deep sense of connectivity washed over my whole being. The innate beauty had me at a loss for words; a sudden outpouring of emotion had me in tears. I cried through the night and with each tear a small part of my trauma trickled down my cheek and dissolved onto the forest floor, freeing me from its toxic energy.

Perhaps most astounding, the mushrooms silenced the self-critical part of my mind long enough for me to reprocess memories without fear or emotion. The mushrooms enabled me to remember one of the most terrifying moments of my career: when I was detained at gunpoint in Bahrain while filming a documentary for CNN. I had lost any detailed recollection of the day when masked men pointed guns at our heads and forced my crew and I onto the ground. For a good half an hour, I did not know whether we were going to survive.

I spent many sleepless nights desperately searching for memories of that day, but they were locked in my subconscious. I knew the memories still haunted me because anytime I would see PTSD ‘triggers’, such as loud noises, helicopters, soldiers, or guns, a rush of anxiety and panic would flood my body.

The psilocybin was the key to unlock the trauma, enabling me to relive the detainment moment to moment, from outside of my body, as an emotionless, objective observer. I peered into the CNN van and saw my former self sitting in the backseat, loud helicopters overhead. My producer Taryn was sitting to the right of me frantically trying to close the van door as we tried to make an escape. I heard Taryn scream “guns!” as armed masked men jumped out of security vehicles surrounding the van. I frantically dug through a backpack on the floor, grabbing my CNN ID card and jumping out of the van. I saw myself land on the ground in child’s pose, and I watched as I threw my hand with the CNN badge in the air above my head yelling “CNN, CNN, don’t shoot!!”

I saw the pain in my face as security forces threw human rights activist and dear friend Nabeel Rajab against a security car and began to harass him. I saw the terror in my face as I glanced down at my shirt, arms in the air, praying the video cards concealed on my body wouldn’t fall onto the ground.

As I relived each moment of the detainment, I re-processed each memory, moving it from the “fear” folder to its new permanent home, the “safe” folder in my brain’s hard drive. Five ceremonies with psilocybin mushrooms cured me of my anxiety and PTSD symptoms. The butterflies that had a constant home in my stomach have flown away.

Psychedelics are not the be-all and end-all. For me, they were the key that opened the door to healing. I still have to work to maintain the healing with the use of floatation tanks, meditation, and yoga. For psychedelics to be effective, it’s essential they are taken with the right mindset in a quiet, relaxed setting conducive to healing, and that all potential prescription drug interactions are carefully researched. Ayahuasca can be fatal if mixed with prescription antidepressants.

I am blessed with an inquisitive nature and a stubbornness to always question authority. Had I opted for the doctor’s script and resigned myself in the hope that things would just get better, I never would have discovered the outer reaches of my mind and heart, and I might still be in the midst of my battle with PTSD.

https://www.sociedelic.com/how-psych...saved-my-life/
 
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