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US Politics The Heroes Act (US Phase 4 Stimulus Package)

Deru

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TRUMP would have been THE PERFECT whip. He would bully everyone into doing what he wanted, like he has in many situations his whole life.
I never even thought of that, but I could totally see that now that you mention it lol. A real life Francis Underwood, minus the intellectual ability :ROFLMAO:
 

Xorkoth

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The Republicans are right to obstruct progress here. The Democrats wouldn't come off their $600/week high horse.
Weren't you telling me you thought the $600/week was a good thing a little while back when I was arguing for giving people just exactly what they were making when they were working?
 

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Captain.Heroin

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Weren't you telling me you thought the $600/week was a good thing a little while back when I was arguing for giving people just exactly what they were making when they were working?
Yes and it is. Fiscal responsibility is also a good thing and you have to balance these two things. It was still the right/logical step for the Republicans to make. Both sides had alternative moves and chose none of them to get to a better point in negotiation talks.
 

Deru

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I moved our conversation here since we're getting into the nuances of the stimulus bill and negotiations.
 

Deru

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Can't direct link to Forbes, but here's an article with some potentially hopeful news regarding stimulus checks

Forbes, Trump: Send Second Stimulus Checks With Covid Relief Funds

Trump: Send Second Stimulus Checks With Covid Relief Funds

During remarks Friday at The White House, Trump said Congress should redirect unused Coronavirus relief funds to fund second stimulus checks for the American people.

“Now, we have $300 billion in a — an account that we didn’t use — $300 billion,” Trump said. “And we are willing to use that. I would be willing to release it, subject to Congress, and use that as stimulus money, and it would go right to the American people. So we have $300 billion sitting in an account that we didn’t need because things are going so well with the economy.”

According to Fox Business, Trump may be referring to money appropriated for small business loans. As part of the Cares Act — the $2.2 trillion stimulus package that that Congress approved in March — Congress appropriated $500 billion. Of that amount, $454 billion was appropriated to cover losses on lending programs. Of that funding, $259 billion remains uncommitted.

“Again, we have $300 billion ready to go,” Trump said. “All Congress has to do is say, “Use it.” If they say, “Use it” — I’d like to use it without their permission, but I guess I’m not allowed to do that. I did ask that question. So Congress has to just say, “Use it.” All they have to do is say, “Use it”; $300 billion gets immediately put into our system, and will really help the American people. There’s nothing else to do — just a very quick statement.”

Democrats and Republicans in Congress have agreed in principle on a $1,200 second stimulus check for individuals and $2,400 check for married/joint filers, which is the same amount as the first stimulus check. However, Republicans want $500 for dependents, while Democrats called for $1,200 for each dependent, with a maximum of three dependents. After an impasse on a broader stimulus package, Congress has not approved a second stimulus check since leaving for summer recess in mid-August.

Stimulus update: Congress back in session
The Senate is back in session tomorrow. What’s the latest update on the stimulus? Senate Republicans may propose a new “skinny” stimulus bill as early as this week. The new stimulus legislation could be approximately $500 billion, which is roughly half the size of the Heals Act, which Senate Republicans proposed earlier this summer. This new stimulus bill could include several areas where there may be bipartisan support on policy topics, but not necessarily on funding amounts:

$300 weekly unemployment benefits
$105 billion in school funding
$250 billion in funding for the Payment Protection Program (PPP)
$10 billion grant to the U.S. Postal Service

However, the new stimulus bill is not expected to include any stimulus checks. However, it’s possible after Trump’s remarks that Republicans could alter the proposed legislation to include a second round of checks. Will this new legislation pass? It’s unlikely. While more Senate Republicans would support a smaller legislative proposal, Democrats want a larger bill. Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-CA) are likely unwilling to agree on an even smaller bill than the Heals Act, which at $1 trillion was deemed too small. Democrats initially proposed a $3 trillion stimulus package (the Heroes Act), although Pelosi said Democrats would be willing to agree to a $2.2 trillion bill.

“The speaker has refused to sit down and negotiate unless we agree to something like a $2.5 trillion deal in advance,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Fox News Sunday. “Let’s do a more targeted bill now and if we need to do more in 30 days we’ll continue to do more, but let’s not hold up the American workers and the American businesses that need more support.”

Democrats want $1 trillion in funding for state and local governments, $600 weekly unemployment benefits and $60 billion for food insecurity, among other initiatives.
 

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Amid Stimulus Impasse, Bipartisan Group Offers $1.5 Trillion Compromise

Members of the House Problem Solvers Caucus plan to map out a recovery package they hope can push top Democrats and White House officials back to the negotiating table.

By Nicholas Fandos and Emily Cochrane
Sept. 15, 2020, 6:00 a.m. ET

A bipartisan group of 50 centrist lawmakers plans on Tuesday to present a $1.5 trillion plan to prop up the coronavirus-ravaged economy, making a last-ditch attempt to broach a compromise in hopes of breaking a stalemate in stimulus talks before November’s elections.

The proposal faces long odds amid partisan divisions over what should be included in such a package, and members of the group — which calls itself the House Problem Solvers Caucus — concede privately that their framework stands little chance of becoming law. But the decision to offer it up publicly reflects frustration among rank-and-file lawmakers in both parties at the failure by their leaders to agree to another round of pandemic aid, and a reluctance to return home weeks before Election Day without cementing such help.

Aiming for a middle ground between Republican and Democratic positions, the proposal includes measures that enjoy bipartisan support, like reviving the popular Paycheck Protection Program for small businesses and direct checks of $1,200 or more for American taxpayers, as well as more contentious ones like new legal rights and protections for workers and their employers.

But the bulk of its proposed spending would fall somewhere in the middle of what the two parties have championed. The measure would reinstate lapsed federal jobless aid at $450 per week for eight weeks, then replace up to $600 weekly in lost wages for an additional five weeks. That is more than Republicans wanted, but less than the flat, $600-a-week benefit that lapsed at the end of July, which Democrats have insisted must be extended in full. And the proposal would send $500 billion to strapped state and local governments, less than the nearly $1 trillion Democrats included in their $3.4 trillion stimulus plan that passed the House in May, but roughly double what the White House has signaled it could support.

The coalition proposing the measure is led by Representatives Josh Gottheimer, Democrat of New Jersey, and Tom Reed, Republican of New York. In unveiling it, the group is seeking to send a signal to Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the lead White House negotiators — Mark Meadows, the chief of staff, and Steven Mnuchin, the Treasury secretary — that there is ample common ground to be found in talks that have been dormant for weeks.

But reviving the talks is a tall order. Negotiations all but broke down in August after a brief but intense round of discussions between Democrats and White House officials to reconcile vast differences in priorities and cost, principally over money for states and those out of work. The primary negotiators have all but given up on passing something into law before the election, and are now focused on agreeing to a stopgap spending measure to keep the government funded through the fall.

In the meantime, millions of jobless Americans are beginning to exhaust traditional unemployment aid that has kept them afloat and stimulated the economy, and many small businesses, including restaurants, have been left to contend with a steep drop in revenue and coming cold weather on their own.

Members of the Problem Solvers Caucus, which is composed of moderate members and has few significant policy achievements to its name, set out to draft their own proposal in early August as they, like most other lawmakers in the House, were frozen out of the talks.

In addition to Mr. Gottheimer and Mr. Reed, Representatives Dean Phillips, Democrat of Minnesota, and Dusty Johnson, Republican of South Dakota, helped write the framework, which took about six weeks to draft.

Though the price tag falls well below that of the $2.2 trillion stimulus law Congress unanimously passed in March, or House Democrats’ $3.4 trillion bill, its effects would be far-reaching.

In addition to money for state and local governments and for schools, lawmakers included $100 billion for testing, contact tracing and other health initiatives to try to increase the nation’s testing capacity to three million tests a day. There is money for expanding rural and urban broadband, supporting agricultural workers and extending the 2020 census to ensure an accurate count.

The bill would allocate $25 billion for mortgage and rental assistance, $130 billion for schools and $15 billion for the beleaguered Postal Service, as well as separate funds to administer the 2020 elections during a health crisis and for food assistance programs.

The group also proposed building in automatic triggers that would extend jobless aid and provide for another round of stimulus checks if the economy remains hobbled in January, potentially driving up the measure’s cost.
 

Deru

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Could we be seeing a glimmer of hope for a new stimulus bill before the election?


Pelosi: House will stay in session until agreement is reached on coronavirus relief

BY SCOTT WONG AND MIKE LILLIS
TWEET SHARE EMAIL

Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on Tuesday announced that the House will remain in session until the parties have an agreement on another round of emergency coronavirus relief.

In a conference call with the House Democratic Caucus - the first since the chamber returned from a long summer recess - Pelosi indicated she isn't willing to accept a "skinny" legislative package, but told her troops the chamber's calendar will be extended until an agreement is sealed, according to sources on the call.

"We have to stay here until we have a bill," Pelosi told lawmakers.

The surprise development reflects both the severity of the public health and economic crises caused by the coronavirus pandemic and the growing pressure Pelosi is facing from the moderate wing of her party, which is clamoring for leadership to vote on another aid package before Congress leaves town again for the elections.

The practical effects of the announcement, however, will likely be slight.

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) acknowledged that most lawmakers will likely return to their districts when the scheduled session ends on Oct. 2, leaving party leaders seeking to hash out an agreement with the White House. If such a deal emerges, then members would be called back to Washington. In that sense, the dynamics would look very similar to those surrounding the long August recess, when the Capitol was all but empty.

"You could look at it as a distinction without a difference of the last few months," Hoyer said on a press call. "But in another sense it tells members, 'Look, we know the election's coming up, we know you want to go back and campaign. But understand this is a priority ... and that we are going to address it as soon as we possibly can.' "

Leaders of the Blue Dog Democrats have, for weeks, pressed Pelosi and other party leaders to take up another relief bill preelection. On Monday, leaders of the New Democrat Coalition piled on, warning that lawmakers in battleground districts could be particularly harmed by congressional inaction. And leaders of the Problem Solvers, a bipartisan group, are set Tuesday morning to unveil a new aid package topping $1.5 trillion.

"We are not in any way attempting to undermine the Speaker's negotiating positions," Rep. Ann Kuster (D-N.H.), a member of the New Democrats, said Monday evening. "Having said that we are taking the position that we want a deal and we don't think we should adjourn until we have it."

Pelosi on Tuesday said she agreed, vowing to extend the House's initial recess date of Oct. 2 if the sides haven't reached a deal beforehand.

"We are committed to staying here until we have an agreement," she told CNBC's Jim Cramer.

What such an agreement looks like - or whether it's even possible - remains unclear. Pelosi and the Democrats had passed a $3.4 trillion relief package through the House in May, and the Speaker has since offered to bring the price tag down to $2.2 trillion. But both proposals were roundly rejected by the White House and Republicans in the Senate, who were calling for legislation in the $1 trillion range.

Highlighting just how far apart the sides are, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) last week offered an even slimmer proposal: a $650 billion package that excluded key demands of Pelosi and the Democrats, including hundreds of billions of dollars in funding for food stamps, the Postal Service, rental assistance and help for state and local governments struggling through the pandemic.

The package was a non-starter with Democrats, who quickly shot it down. But that has only fueled the Republican attacks that Democrats are unwilling to compromise on another round of emergency aid, even as tens of millions of workers remain unemployed and tens of thousands of businesses are grappling to survive.

Even as she vowed to keep the House in session, Pelosi did not back off her insistence that the next aid package must be robust, telling Democrats on Tuesday's call that "a skinny bill is a Republican bill."

A number of senior Democrats in the liberal-leaning caucus are racing to Pelosi's side. Several committee chairs - including Reps. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.), Richard Neal (D-Mass.) and Bobby Scott (D-Va.) - all spoke up during the caucus call to back the Speaker in her hard-line negotiations with the White House.

Still, not everyone is on board. Reps. Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.), chairman of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, and Kim Schrier (D-Wash.), a physician, also spoke up on the call urging passage of another relief package before the next recess.

Extending the calendar will likely lead to grumbling from some lawmakers, who are eager to return quickly to their districts ahead of the Nov. 3 elections. Some of those members may opt to vote by proxy, a system Pelosi adopted earlier in the year to acknowledge the unique public health threat posed by the coronavirus.

House Democratic Caucus Chair Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.) said the majority of the caucus is in agreement they should remain in session until a deal is reached.

"It's clear to me, based on the calls that have taken place up until this point and the caucus meeting today, that the overwhelming consensus amongst the members is that we stick around until we get something done for the American people," he told reporters at a press conference on Tuesday following the lengthy caucus call.

- Juliegrace Brufke contributed. Updated at 11:58 a.m.
 

Deru

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All of this has happened within the past 48 hours, with this seeming to be the spur of it. Here's Mnuchin signaling to GOP Senators to remove the gigantic stick up their assess and stop being useless with their infuriating and pathetic attempt to pass that absolute joke of a 300 billion dollar of new funds bill:


'Now is not the time to worry' about the fiscal deficit or the Fed's balance sheet, Mnuchin says

PUBLISHED MON, SEP 14 2020 8:53 AM EDT
UPDATED MON, SEP 14 2020 11:19 AM EDT
Thomas Franck

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said that lawmakers should not allow fears over the federal deficit or the Fed's balance sheet to delay additional Covid-19 relief.

Mnuchin, who with White House chief of staff Mark Meadows has led the administration's Covid-19 relief negotiations, said the economic crisis warrants extraordinary stimulus from Congress and the Fed.

"Now is not the time to worry about shrinking the deficit or shrinking the Fed balance sheet," Mnuchin told CNBC's "Squawk Box."

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told CNBC on Monday that lawmakers should not allow fears over the size of the nation's deficit or the Federal Reserve's balance sheet to delay additional Covid-19 relief.

Mnuchin, who with White House chief of staff Mark Meadows has led the administration's Covid-19 relief negotiations, said the economic crisis warrants extraordinary stimulus from Congress and the Fed.

"Now is not the time to worry about shrinking the deficit or shrinking the Fed balance sheet," Mnuchin told CNBC's "Squawk Box" from the White House. "There was a time when the Fed was shrinking the balance sheet and coming back to normal. The good news is that gave them a lot of room to increase the balance sheet, which they did."

"And I think both the monetary policy working with fiscal policy and what we were able to get done in an unprecedented way with Congress is the reason the economy is doing better," he added.

Mnuchin's comments critiqued his fellow Republicans who argue that improving jobs data and strong housing figures relax the need for additional spending to combat the impact of the coronavirus.

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., for example, voted against a GOP "skinny" stimulus plan last week and has repeatedly attacked his own party for what he views as prodigal spending.

"The majority of Republicans are now no different than socialist Democrats when it comes to debt," Paul wrote on Twitter in July. "They simply don't care about debt and are preparing to add at least another trillion dollars in debt this month, combined with the trillions from earlier this summer."

The cumulative federal budget deficit for the first 11 months of fiscal year 2020 was $3 trillion, according to the Congressional Budget Office, a byproduct of intensified government spending to get the economy through the pandemic-associated shutdown.

Mnuchin, who argues that more stimulus is needed to help the U.S. economy, said Monday that "we are rebounding in a very, very significant way."

Paul's vote helped sink the Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's plan, which fell short of the 60 votes needed on a procedural step to move toward passage.

All Democrats present and Paul voted against the bill in a 52-47 vote. That legislation would have reimposed enhanced federal unemployment insurance at a rate of $300 per week, half of the $600 weekly payment that expired at the end of July. The Democrats said it didn't go far enough.

Mnuchin struck a more compromising tone Monday and said he's still willing to work with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on a new deal.

"I think there's many areas of this where is an agreement between the Democrats and the Republicans, and some of the areas we do have differences on the amounts," he said. "But I will continue to work on this: I've told the speaker I'm available any time to negotiate."

The Treasury Secretary said he expects the Problem Solvers Caucus to produce a stimulus proposal later Monday.

To summarize these three articles, in the past 48 hours a lot has happened!

Mnuchin started the week signaling to GOP Senators to stop being useless, the Bipartisan House Problem Solvers Caucus releasing a compromise proposal, and then shortly after Pelosi signaling the House will stay in session until an agreement is reached. Good news for anyone hoping for additional stimulus due to the Covid-19 pandemic! Let's see if GOP Senators can be human beings and do their job, for once. We shall see!
 

Captain.Heroin

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Mnuchin, the guy who poses with sheets of money with his wife looking like they belong to the mafia doesn't worry about the deficit? 😂 No of course he wouldn't worry about that.

I'm glad they're trying desperately but I don't think it's going to work. You can't even convince the Republicans to wear a mask, and then when they get covid like Gohmert did he thinks the mask gave it to him. These people are fundamentally stupid and not able to mentally function correctly.

Just an observation.
 

Deru

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My only hope is that Mnuchin and Meadows represent the White House, and thus Trump, so if either Mnuchin or Meadows signals something there may be hope to get McConnel on board.

I think Pelosi played this brilliantly, honestly. Right before the election, give Republicans one more good fair compromise. If they agree, everyone wins. If they don't, hopefully they can say good bye to the big lunch room in the Senate ;) and we'll pass it through when Democrats have the majority in the Senate 😁
 

Deru

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Schumer is holding a press conference right now about the wildfires ... maybe we'll get some good questions from reporters on Stimulus here.

It's already starting by "President Trump suggested idiotically..."

Sigh... How did our country get here?
 

TheLoveBandit

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Getting to the point ...
My only hope is that Mnuchin and Meadows represent the White House, and thus Trump, so if either Mnuchin or Meadows signals something there may be hope to get McConnel on board.
I don't think Mitch is as aligned with the WH as one would expect, despite his Trump genuflections during the impeachment. Moreover, I don't think anyone speaks for Trump. Even Trump will contradict Trump in short order, just give him time.


I think Pelosi played this brilliantly, honestly. Right before the election, give Republicans one more good fair compromise. If they agree, everyone wins. If they don't, hopefully they can say good bye to the big lunch room in the Senate ;) and we'll pass it through when Democrats have the majority in the Senate 😁
It is good leverage if Pelosi says 'stay to get it done' and the R's don't. Black eye before elections.

I'm curious, though...what happens if R's gain control in the House and retain the Senate? :D
 

Deru

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I'm curious, though...what happens if R's gain control in the House and retain the Senate? :D
Sounds like one of those nightmares I'd hope to wake up from in the morning :ROFLMAO:

I do agree McConnel isn't as aligned with the WH though, I imagine all Senate Republicans are in a very odd position with Trump.
 

Deru

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@Captain.Heroin

If Mnuchin wasn't sufficient for signaling Republic senators, how about Trump, himself?


The White House strongly signaled Wednesday that it is willing to increase its offer in talks with Democrats and that Senate Republicans should go along in order to seal a stimulus deal in the next week to 10 days.
.
.
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Trump on Twitter urged Republican lawmakers to accept a higher level of spending.

Donald J. Trump
@realDonaldTrump
Democrats are “heartless”. They don’t want to give STIMULUS PAYMENTS to people who desperately need the money, and whose fault it was NOT that the plague came in from China. Go for the much higher numbers, Republicans, it all comes back to the USA anyway (one way or another!).
Sent via Twitter for iPhone.
White House Telegraphs Willingness to Increase Stimulus Offer
By Erik Wasson, Jordan Fabian, and Laura Litvan
September 16, 2020, 11:20 AM EDT
Updated on September 16, 2020, 1:36 PM EDT

The White House strongly signaled Wednesday that it is willing to increase its offer in talks with Democrats and that Senate Republicans should go along in order to seal a stimulus deal in the next week to 10 days.

Chief of Staff Mark Meadows said President Donald Trump is open to the compromise $1.52 trillion stimulus proposal from a bipartisan group of House lawmakers that was an effort to break a months-long deadlock over bolstering the U.S. economy amid the pandemic.

The long-shot plan from a 50-member group of House Democrats and Republicans has a bigger total spending figure than the administration previously endorsed. It’s also higher than what Senate GOP leaders say would be acceptable to Republicans.

Meadows said on CNBC that the amount is not a “show-stopper.” But House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has called it insufficient, while Senator John Thune, the chamber’s second-ranking Republican, said a $1.5 trillion stimulus would cause “a lot of heartburn” for GOP lawmakers.

Trump on Twitter urged Republican lawmakers to accept a higher level of spending.

Donald J. Trump
@realDonaldTrump
Democrats are “heartless”. They don’t want to give STIMULUS PAYMENTS to people who desperately need the money, and whose fault it was NOT that the plague came in from China. Go for the much higher numbers, Republicans, it all comes back to the USA anyway (one way or another!).
Sent via Twitter for iPhone.

View original tweet.

After initially proposing a $1 trillion stimulus at the end of July, Senate Republicans attempted to advance a bill providing $650 billion in economic aid, without the direct payments to individuals the president -- and Democrats -- want. That was blocked by Democrats, who said it didn’t do enough to address the continuing Covid-19 crisis.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell declined to comment when asked about Trump’s call for Republicans to go higher. Negotiations on the stimulus have been handled by Pelosi, Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer, Meadows and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.

The Problem Solvers Caucus plan was developed over six weeks with the knowledge of the White House and leadership from both parties. But the track record of bipartisan groupings of moderates in either the House or Senate to broker major deals has been poor in recent years.

The proposal offered compromises on the thorniest issues in the stalled talks. On aid to state and local governments, the group is backing about $500 billion, splitting the difference between the $915 billion sought by Pelosi and Schumer and the $150 billion put forward by the White House.

Read more: House Moderates Unveil $1.52 Trillion Bipartisan Relief Plan

Meadows said the $500 billion figure is more than the White House estimates that states have lost in revenue due to the pandemic, but added that the administration could accept a figure in the $250 billion-$300 billion range.

Another fault line in talks has been the level of supplemental jobless benefits. The Problem Solvers proposed $450 a week for eight weeks, and then a transition to benefits of 100% of salary or $600, whichever is lower. That is a compromise between the $600 flat rate Democrats want -- the same as expired in July -- and the $300 Trump has backed.

Under the Problem Solvers plan, total spending could increase to about $2 trillion if the pandemic continues, or shrink to $1.3 trillion if it subsides more quickly than expected. The White House had previously been willing to back about $1.1 trillion.

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer on Tuesday said Democrats shouldn’t agree to less than $2 trillion. A group of House Democratic chairmen issued a statement criticizing the Problem Solvers proposal as inadequate. Pelosi earlier on MSNBC Wednesday reinforced her demand for $2.2 trillion.

Republican Divisions

“We did come down,” Pelosi said of her willingness to compromise. “We can only go so far.”

Trump’s new push for a deal highlights continuing divisions among Republicans, some of whom are reluctant to spend more money on stimulus with the national deficit reaching $3.3 trillion this year.

Missouri Republican Senator Roy Blunt said a number higher than $1 trillion can be the basis for an agreement, if it can be done quickly.

“I think there is a deal to be had here,” he told reporters at the Capitol. “My concern is that the window probably closes around the end of this month. And we need to get busy finding out what we can all agree on.”

But other senators resisted the idea.

Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson said the Senate GOP bill, which costs about $300 billion when its cuts to Federal Reserve loan authority are counted, is the right amount.

“The president has his opinion. We have ours,” he told reporters.

“I need to see what it would be for and how it would be spent,” John Kennedy, a Louisiana Republican, said. “And if a bill is chock full of spending porn as Speaker Pelosi’s bill is, I’m not going to vote for it.”

(Adds senators’ reaction starting in the seventh paragraph.)
 

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If Mnuchin wasn't sufficient for signaling Republic senators, how about Trump, himself?
Trump: "Build the wall"

5 miles of new wall, the rest of it is replacing pre-existing wall.

Trump is an inefficient president. It's "not his fault" because the Republican congressmen/senators are so dysfunctional and desperately spread away from each other on a wide continuum - I don't think you will ever see unilateral legislation passed again like earlier this year. The Republican party is clueless. With a better senate Trump might actually be able to get things done.

But with fools in the senate like McConnell and Cruz, and a house of jokers like Scalise and Gohmer? No chance in hell.
 

Deru

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I don't think it will be easy, for sure. I'm just saying the prospect looks much better than it did 96 hours ago 😁

And Cruz... Seriously that guy drives me insane.
 

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So I am trying to keep up with this. I read that Trump pretty much is against the new stimulus package, but then I read that he changed his mind, and wants to provide paycheck protection, stimulus package etc.
does anyone know what the fuck is going on with this?
 

Deru

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So I am trying to keep up with this. I read that Trump pretty much is against the new stimulus package, but then I read that he changed his mind, and wants to provide paycheck protection, stimulus package etc.
does anyone know what the fuck is going on with this?
Trump being Trump. He announced he instructed Mnuchin to stop negotiations until after he "wins" re-election, the stock market plummeted immediately after he tweeted that, then he immediately reversed course and tried to dangle the 1,200 stimulus checks for everyone and put the pressure back on Pelosi. He might quite possibly be the most transparent idiot I have ever witnessed, and the hilarious thing, is he surrounds himself by nutjobs and criminals who enforce how "brilliant" he thinks he is. He lives in a twisted alternative reality, that's for sure.
 
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