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The 2020 Candidates: Right, Left and Center!

cduggles

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Buttigieg raised $24.7 million in the fourth quarter. He’s probably going to take Iowa. He’s a contender, although he probably won’t win much African American support, which really hurts him.
 

cduggles

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I like Andrew Yang. He’s smart and fresh and has a different way of looking at things. He doesn’t really have a full platform, but he is changing the conversation regarding automation and special needs children.

Andrew Yang's campaign says it raised $16.5 million in Q4




Andrew Yang's 2020 presidential campaign said Thursday that it raised $16.5 million during 2019's fourth quarter, reports the New York Times.

Why it matters: It's Yang's best quarter yet, topping the $10 million he raised in the third quarter, and is likely to put him among the top fundraisers in the crowded Democratic field.
  • The strong fourth-quarter performance also shows how quickly Yang has built a fundraising machine — as he raised just $2.8 million in the second quarter.
The state of play: Yang's campaign said that New Year's Eve ended up being his best fundraising day of the year, raking in more than $1.3 million.
  • It also said that he's received donations from 400,000 people who have together given more than 1 million donations over the course of the campaign.
The big picture: Yang is one of the first candidates to release his Q4 fundraising totals. Pete Buttigieg released his on New Year's Day, touting a $24.7 million haul that also looks set to put him among the top fundraisers in the field.

Yes, but: Despite Yang's big quarter, he may not find himself on the debate stage this month thanks to the DNC's polling requirements.
  • It rejected his request to commission more early-state polls in order to help a more "diverse set of candidates" qualify for the next debate.
Go deeper: Andrew Yang on the issues, in under 500 words
 

alasdairm

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i read today that the total spending on the 2016 election (congressional and presidential candidates) was $6.5B.

that is absolutely staggering to me. to put that in perspective, for that amount of money you could build ~150 schools!

alasdair
 

cduggles

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^ And Democrats have yet to coalesce behind a single candidate. Hopefully the tap will open then for the Dem candidate, because Trump is raising tons of money though. Tons. Hence the cowardice in the GOP.


As mentioned in above article, Julian Castro is out.

I like Yang’s contribution to the dialogue, and he understands math. Although his platform is limited, he’s bringing important issues to the fore. Well, as much as he can.
 

Infernal

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yang is just another dumbfuck neoliberal. if we're going to have yet another neoliberal president I'd prefer Warren
Hopeful messages while drone striking weddings and selling us up the creek to Wall Street. It'll be like Obama again! A return to normalcy! ;)
 

tathra

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Bernie on our latest assassination. I also want to mention that Bernie has the most support among veterans, like myself, than any other candidate

Bernie Sanders said:
I want to take a moment to address the events in Iraq and the escalating crisis in the Middle East. Yesterday, President Trump ordered the assassination of a top Iranian general, Qassem Solemani, in Iraq, along with the leader of an Iraqi militia. This is a dangerous escalation that brings us closer to another disastrous war in the Middle East, which could cost countless lives and trillions more dollars, and lead to even more deaths, more conflict, more displacement in that already highly volatile region of the world.

When I voted against the war in Iraq in 2002, I feared that it would result in greater destabilization in that country and the entire region. At the time, I warned about the deadly so-called unintended consequences of a unilateral invasion.

Today, 17 years later, that fear has unfortunately turned out to be a truth. The United States has lost some 4,500 brave men and women fighting in Iraq, tens of thousands have been wounded, hundreds of thousands of Iraqis have been killed and trillions of dollars have been spent on that war.

The result: today we have massive unrest in that country, we have corruption in that country, we have terrible poverty in that country and now, Iraqis want American troops out.

All of that suffering. All of that death. All of those huge expenditures of money. For what?

It gives me no pleasure to tell you that, at this moment, we face a similar crossroads fraught with danger. Once again we must worry about unintended consequences and the impact of unilateral decision making.

Let me repeat a warning I gave in 2002 during the debate over the war in Iraq: “War must be the last recourse in our international relations. And as a caring nation, we must do everything we can to prevent the horrible suffering that a war will cause.”

As the former chair of the U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans Affairs, I have seen up close the pain, death, and despair caused by war.

I’ve gone to too many funerals in my own state. I’ve talked to too many mothers who have lost their kids in war. I’ve talked to too many soldiers, men and women, who have come home with PTSD, who have come home without arms and without legs.

And I know that it is rarely the children of the billionaire class who face the agony of reckless foreign policy. It is the children of working families.

Let us not forget that when Trump took office, we had a nuclear agreement with Iran, negotiated by the Obama administration along with our closest allies. Countries from all over the world came together to negotiate that agreement that put a lid on Iran’s nuclear program.

The wise course would have been to stick with that nuclear agreement, enforce its provisions, and use that diplomatic channel with Iran to address a wide range of other concerns, including their support of terrorism.

Unfortunately, Trump ignored the advice of his own security officials and listened to right-wing extremists, some of whom were exactly the same people who got us into the war in Iraq in the first place.

As we all remember, Trump promised to end endless wars. Tragically, his actions now put us on the path to another war, potentially one that could be even worse than before.

The truth as we all know is that the world today is a very dangerous place. We are seeing a movement, all across the planet, towards authoritarianism. We are seeing a growing arms race, and we are seeing nuclear weapons in the hands of unstable and hostile regimes. I believe that in the midst of all of that, the role of the United States, difficult though it may be, must be to work with the international community to end conflicts, to end the threat of war, not to promote war as Trump is doing.

This is how the true power of the United States is shown, and that is how I will use American power as president.

As I think we have seen for several years now, Trump makes decisions impulsively, without explanation, and -- in this case, as in the past -- without any Congressional consultation. I believe strongly that a key step in ending our endless wars is for the Congress to reassert its constitutional authority over matters of war.

Our Founding Fathers had it right, and they gave the responsibility of war to Congress, and that is exactly where it must be placed.

I find it incredible that at the same time as Trump is greatly expanding military spending -- and I am proud to tell you that I have voted against all of Trump’s military budgets -- at the same time he is spending billions more on the military, he is cutting back on the diplomatic capabilities of the State Department to negotiate agreements around the world. And that to my mind is a very dangerous course of action.

I have consistently opposed this dangerous path to war with Iran. But we need to do more than just stop the potential of a war. We need to firmly commit to ending the U.S. military presence in the Middle East in an orderly manner, not through a tweet, and must understand that these wars have cost us so much in blood and treasure. We must end our involvement in the Yemen war led by Saudi Arabia, which is now one of the worst humanitarian catastrophes on earth, and bring our troops home from Afghanistan.

Instead of provoking more volatility in the region, the United States must use its power, its wealth and its influence to bring the regional powers to the table to resolve conflicts.

Let me conclude by simply saying this: At a time when we have 500,000 Americans who are homeless today, including 30,000 veterans, at a time when some 87 million people are either uninsured or underinsured and 30,000 die each year because they don’t get to a doctor when they should, and at a time when we face an urgent need to rebuild our crumbling infrastructure, to build the housing that we desperately need and to address the existential crisis of climate change, we as a nation must get our priorities right. We must invest in the needs of the American people, not spend trillions more on endless wars.
 

tathra

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Supporters of Joe Biden are unlikely to be persuaded by most of the common criticisms. They know he can be rambling and unintelligible. They know his record is unimpressive and that he doesn’t really have “policy proposals”. None of this matters, though, because to them he has the most important quality of all: he can beat Donald Trump. Nothing you can say about the former vice-president’s record, platform or mental state matters next to the argument that he is the best hope Democrats have of getting Trump out of office.

There’s just one problem: it’s a myth. It is a myth just as it was a myth that Hillary Clinton was a good candidate against Trump. Biden is not, in fact, the pragmatic choice. He would not beat Trump. He would lose. And we must say this over and over again. Forget his flubs. Forget his finger-nibbling. Biden would be crushed by Trump. If you want Trump out of office, don’t support Biden.

...
 

Xorkoth

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Biden would lose horribly, it's hard to imagine anyone believing otherwise. It's moronic to think he's the best candidate.

I seriously hope the DNC isn't so stupid as to repeat the same mistake they made in 2016... but unfortunately I'm not at all sure they aren't... Warren would be a far better choice than Biden, but Bernie... please DNC, wake the fuck up.
 

Xorkoth

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I think there's a chance Warren would win, more of one than Biden anyway. But yeah Bernie has the best chance I think. And would obviously be the best candidate as well. There are few politicians of today that I trust, and he tops that list.
 

cduggles

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Trump’s re-election will depend on the economy, whether or not we’re at war (and how his base feels about it), and who the Democratic nominee is.
I feel like people are forgetting Trump hasn’t delivered on much and that his endorsement is no longer a surefire turnout machine (on the contrary), which is important. His popularity isn’t high, particularly for this economy. His base turnout has to be high, although that’s true for either side.
Also, the Dems took the House in midterms because people voted for them. Elections still matter.
My personal preferences notwithstanding, Biden could likely beat Trump.
 

Nicomorphinist

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This is an uncommon sentiment amongst the rehab gangsters and related running dogs of the Post-Modern Techno-Industrial Megastate . . . I figure there are maybe three others stil in there (Sanders, Yang, and Gabbard) would have the clarity and titanium spine to challenge all of this . . . Senator Harris was especially alarming to the chronic pain people for various reasons. Other folks have told me that Senator Booker (Democrat, New Jersey) and a couple of others were not completely brain dead about this issue as well.

During the second debate there were about 25 of us watching the debate and Skyping with about 20 others and some of the watch party folks and for this debate and the third debate, what we did is to have pharmacy jugs of Tussionex or Hydromet/Codiclear and/or Vikes, Lortab, and others as well as dihydrocodeine products and we would all down a shot or eat a tablet every time the fake crisis was mentioned, and a lot of people were in a warm hug pile on the floor by the time it was all over. Given my existing tolerance, I started the evening with a shot of Rumpleminze and a swig of Paracodin (dihydrocodeine hydroiodide) linctus. I also contributed to the kitty washings from 10 Tusscodin Retard bottles with diluted šljivovica; Tusscodin Retard is the nicocodeine analogue of Tussionex.
 
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TheLoveBandit

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Getting to the point ...
Trump’s re-election will depend on the economy, whether or not we’re at war (and how his base feels about it), and who the Democratic nominee is.
I feel like people are forgetting Trump hasn’t delivered on much and that his endorsement is no longer a surefire turnout machine (on the contrary), which is important. His popularity isn’t high, particularly for this economy. His base turnout has to be high, although that’s true for either side.
As for delivering... TRUMPACCOMPLISHMENTS.pdf

Also, the Dems took the House in midterms because people voted for them. Elections still matter.
My personal preferences notwithstanding, Biden could likely beat Trump.
Trump won, in a large part, by people voting AGAINST Hillary. I think there will be a large turnout to vote AGAINST Trump this go'round, regardless of who the Dem candidate is. What will be interesting to me is who turns out to vote FOR Trump this time = what that says about American's viewing his first term, how the media influences that view (swaying people against him, or being shunned as fake news?), and how the left reacts if he wins again.
 
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