Study Supraphysiologic-dose AAS use: risk factor for dementia?

alan2102

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Yoiks! As if we did not have enough to worry about! So, in addition to the cardiovascular protective stack, and
kidney protective stack, about which I have written here, we might have to consider a brain protective stack as well.
Fortunately there is a great deal of overlap: often, what protects the CV system also protects the kidneys and brain,
and vice versa.

full text of item below is here:
sci-hub.tw/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.02.014


www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30817935

Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2019 May;100:180-207. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.02.014. Epub 2019 Feb 25.
Supraphysiologic-dose anabolic-androgenic steroid use: A risk factor for dementia?
Kaufman MJ1, Kanayama G2, Hudson JI2, Pope HG Jr2.
Author information

Abstract

Supraphysiologic-dose anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) use is associated with physiologic, cognitive, and brain abnormalities similar to those found in people at risk for developing Alzheimer's Disease and its related dementias (AD/ADRD), which are associated with high brain β-amyloid (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau (tau-P) protein levels. Supraphysiologic-dose AAS induces androgen abnormalities and excess oxidative stress, which have been linked to increased and decreased expression or activity of proteins that synthesize and eliminate, respectively, Aβ and tau-P. Aβ and tau-P accumulation may begin soon after initiating supraphysiologic-dose AAS use, which typically occurs in the early 20s, and their accumulation may be accelerated by other psychoactive substance use, which is common among non-medical AAS users. Accordingly, the widespread use of supraphysiologic-dose AAS may increase the numbers of people who develop dementia. Early diagnosis and correction of sex-steroid level abnormalities and excess oxidative stress could attenuate risk for developing AD/ADRD in supraphysiologic-dose AAS users, in people with other substance use disorders, and in people with low sex-steroid levels or excess oxidative stress associated with aging.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
KEYWORDS:
Aging; Alcohol; Alzheimer's disease; Amyloid; Anabolic-androgenic steroid; ApoE; Aquaporin 4; Body-building; Boldenone; Cannabis; Cocaine; Dementia; Estrogen; GSK3β; Heroin; Homocysteine; Hypogonadism; Insomnia; Insulin Degrading enzyme; Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein1; Magnetic resonance imaging; Magnetic resonance spectroscopy; Menopause; Methamphetamine; Mild Cognitive Impairment; Morphine; Muscularity; N-acetylcysteine; Nandrolone; Neprilysin; Neurodegeneration; Nrf2; Opioid; Oxidative stress; Oxymetholone; PET imaging; Performance-enhancing drugs; Polydrug use; Prealbumin; Presenilin; Protein phosphatase 2A; Scyllo-inositol; Sex-steroid; Sleep disturbances; Stanozolol; Substance use disorder; Testosterone; Tobacco; Zinc; tau; α-secretase; β-secretase; γ-secretase

PMID: 30817935 PMCID: PMC6451684 [Available on 2020-05-01] DOI: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.02.014
 

alan2102

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PS: I should add that this is probably not THAT big a deal, else we would have seen (by now) an epidemic of Alzheimer's among older bodybuilders. Larry Scott comes to mind, but I can't think of any others (perhaps because of incipient dementia? haha). It is probably the case that extreme AAS use increases risk *somewhat*, such that one might develop dementia *if one lives long enough*. Some diseases, like Parkinson's and osteoarthritis, are said to be diseases that everyone will get if they live long enough; but most people die of something else before they get them. So it might be with dementia onset hastened (slightly?) by AAS use: a moot point if one dies of something else, meanwhile, as might turn out to be likely.
 

CFC

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Thanks for posting this alan. It nicely ties in with several earlier papers discussing the various risks to the brain from things like trenbolone and/or unbalanced hormone ratios (eg relative lack of oestrogen/oxidative stress) which I think we might have stickied.

And given the apparently robust correlation between tooth decay bacteria and dementia, rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions, plus the fact that AAS can quite substantially modulate immune function and alter the host bacterial flora, I would wonder if that may be yet another synergistic risk vector from high dose AAS use. I don't hold out much hope of it being studied anytime soon tho 😐
 

Genetic Freak

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Thanks for posting this alan. It nicely ties in with several earlier papers discussing the various risks to the brain from things like trenbolone and/or unbalanced hormone ratios (eg relative lack of oestrogen/oxidative stress) which I think we might have stickied.

And given the apparently robust correlation between tooth decay bacteria and dementia, rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions, plus the fact that AAS can quite substantially modulate immune function and alter the host bacterial flora, I would wonder if that may be yet another synergistic risk vector from high dose AAS use. I don't hold out much hope of it being studied anytime soon tho 😐
You are starting to hear more about the negative impact of tooth decay bacteria, especially in regards root canal treatments.. Quite worrying considering I've a few myself..
 

Serotonin101

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The mind is a terrible thing to lose but so much fun to abuse.

I'll be the sexiest guy in the assisted living home.
 

OpiateKiller

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Interesting. It’s not really a widely accepted fact but I’m a firm believer heavy metals such as aluminum have a direct link on dementia and Alzheimer’s.

I don’t know much about steroid synthesis, but is it possible in underground labs that some steroids may be tainted with metals like lead or aluminum? This would be very bad injecting these on a weekly basis if they were tainted and could contribute to Dementia (in my opinion)
 

Serotonin101

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Interesting. It’s not really a widely accepted fact but I’m a firm believer heavy metals such as aluminum have a direct link on dementia and Alzheimer’s.

I don’t know much about steroid synthesis, but is it possible in underground labs that some steroids may be tainted with metals like lead or aluminum? This would be very bad injecting these on a weekly basis if they were tainted and could contribute to Dementia (in my opinion)
Loads of ugl have been found to be contaminated with heavy metals over the years. Wouldn't be surprised if this is linked as well though I'm unsure if the concentrations are high enough as dosage makes the poison.
 
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