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In Other News... Skilled Labor Shortage | American factories are desperate for workers

mr peabody

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The skilled-labor shortage is getting worse!​


There's a shortage of skilled tradespeople throughout the American economy, and it is a persistent problem that started well before the pandemic. But what's behind that gap and what can be done? Paul Solman reports for our series, "Work Shift", which focuses on navigating the job market in a post-COVID economy.​
 
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TheLoveBandit

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Getting to the point ...
It's actually a great career direction, and one I would recommend to many young adults. Certainly better than taking on a lot of college debt for a useless degree. I've made use of a general handyman (licensed, does work to code) and talked to a few that are doing it. Granted, most I talk to are the older (40's+) experienced guys, but they are easily hitting 6-figures for annual income and some jobs can be done cash-under-the-table. Downside is paying for your own insurance and benefits when you are self-employed. But you can also pick and choose your jobs (went to work, how dirty to get, etc) and your price. There is definitely an upside, and college isn't for everybody despite what your parents or gov't may tell you.
 
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TheLoveBandit

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Getting to the point ...
jesus christ thats shit pay. Here plumbers make 180k per year starting at 70k on apprentinceships

Depends upon location I suppose. Yeah, $15/h is only about $30k annually and that is before taxes. Then again, it's an apprentice position leading more lucrative work. It's a PBS video, so I'm assuming that's US? $30k should be bottom level entry for anything. Can't raise a family, but can get out of HS and start earning.
 

TripSitterNZ

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its shocking how America is still a low income economy. America really needs to move forward with min wage increases. Australia and NZ trades are pretty high paying but cost of living is pretty high aswell but after like 4-5 years those who acutally knew what to do their money make their own business which profits very well. Easily charge themselves out at $145 a hour.
 

mr peabody

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DISCOVER APPRENTICESHIP: EARN WHILE YOU LEARN!

When you're ready, you're ready. Why wait years to gain skills and unleash your potential when you can start now? Become an apprentice to get started in the career you're planning for, today.

American workers and career seekers, like you, are looking for opportunities to fast track their career goals, avoid debt, and earn competitive wages. An apprenticeship program can put you on that career pathway.

WHAT IS APPRENTICESHIP?

Apprenticeship is an industry-driven, high-quality career pathway where employers can develop and prepare their future workforce, and individuals can obtain paid work experience, classroom instruction, and a portable, nationally-recognized credential.



Why Become An Apprentice?

Through an apprenticeship program, you can obtain paid, relevant workplace experience while acquiring the skills and credentials that employer’s value. 94% of apprentices who complete an apprenticeship retain employment, with an average annual salary of $70,000. Learn more about the benefits of apprenticeship for career seekers and prospective apprentices.

Gain workplace-relevant skills in the field of your choice through on-the-job learning and under the supervision of an experienced mentor. The length of an apprenticeship program can vary depending on the employer, complexity of the occupation, industry, and type of program.

These components differentiate apprenticeships from other types of workplace training programs in several ways:

PAID JOB

Apprenticeships are jobs! Get paid to learn throughout your apprenticeship with a guaranteed wage increase as you develop new skills.

CREDENTIALS

Earn a portable, nationally-recognized credential within your industry.

JUMPSTART YOUR CAREER

Ease the transition from school to career by working and learning at the same time.

EDUCATION

Gain workplace-relevant skills in the field of your choice through on-the-job learning.

DEGREE POTENTIAL

Get academic credit towards a college degree for the skills you learn while avoiding student debt.

MENTORSHIP

Connect with mentor(s) in your chosen industry who can help you advance your career.



FIND PROGRAMS IN MULTIPLE INDUSTRIES

Apprenticeship programs are available in multiple industries, including:

▶Information Technology
▶Healthcare
▶Hospitality
▶Cybersecurity
▶Energy
▶Advanced Manufacturing
▶Engineering
▶Transportation
▶Construction
▶Financial Services


HOW TO BECOME AN APPRENTICE

There are many ways to find the right apprenticeship opportunity for you.

- Apprenticeship opportunities are offered through an employer or the program sponsor.

- To become an apprentice, search for an opportunity using our Apprenticeship Finder and apply directly with the employer or the program sponsor.

- If you are interested in seeking an apprenticeship but need more guidance, find an American Job Center near you. They help businesses find qualified workers and can help you obtain an apprenticeship to enhance your career.

Questions about a specific opportunity? Contact the employer or the program sponsor listed on the job posting for more information.



Start Your Career

Ready to jumpstart your career in a high demand field? Find your desired opportunity using the Apprenticeship Finder.

Want to learn more or find apprenticeship opportunities near you? Visit the U.S. Department of Labor’s one-stop source for all things apprenticeship:

www.apprenticeship.gov

Phone: 1-877-872-5627
 
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SnafuInTheVoid

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Cool. Lots of stuff in my area. I didn't know there were pharmacy apprenticeship.

Idk if I could work in a pharmacy... Might be too tempted
 

RedRum OG

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its shocking how America is still a low income economy. America really needs to move forward with min wage increases. Australia and NZ trades are pretty high paying but cost of living is pretty high aswell but after like 4-5 years those who acutally knew what to do their money make their own business which profits very well. Easily charge themselves out at $145 a hour.

Some folks in the US recently tried to get a $15 minimum wage, and were vehemently opposed on all sides. I make $20-25/hour depending on tips. I am single, rent an apartment, and own my car. I can't save shit, and i live very cheaply. If you live in/near any major city, $15/hour is absolutely insulting, and somehow people think that is too much. All hope is lost.

Somewhere along the road, the rich convinced the masses that it wasn't them taking all the money. Genius. If CEO salary were capped at 10x their lowest paid worker, the world would be different.
 

mr peabody

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Pandemic is propelling demand for short-term college programs


It’s been a brutal academic year for higher education, with enrollment down in the fall more than 560,000 undergraduate students compared to 2019. But there has been at least one area of growth at many schools: short-term programs that help students gain new skills for the workforce quickly. Hari Sreenivasan reports as part of our ongoing series, “Rethinking College.”​
 
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mr peabody

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Matching Thousands of Job Seekers with Potential Employers


This week marked the 52nd straight week of high unemployment claims, with numbers rising as more than a million people filed for state and emergency federal unemployment benefits across the country. One state, Rhode Island, is working to reverse that trend by matching several thousand job-seeking residents with potential employers.

U.S. Department of Labor - Job Training Programs
 
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bmf666

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@xorketh I guess where we differ then is on how much we believe people abuse it. In my experience I haven’t seen anyone that couldn’t legitimately work and I’ve seen a lot of people abuse it so that’s why I feel the way I do. As far as the benifits as I said you have to go out of your way to get it but for anyone that values it it’s really not that hard. Zero skill jobs aren’t meant to be careers and the argument that everyone can’t work trades or other professions that give a living wage that’s not even close to being a problem now so who cares. The guy above shared the link about how we need tradesmen and I personally know we pay illegals good money because we can’t get Americans to do the work. I used the wedlock phrase because that’s how they said it in the article but I agree it’s more about being established and more often then not married people planed it but that’s not always the case
 

bmf666

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Pretty sure there’s an abundance of trade jobs open and the military is definitely open so the whole problem of there not being enough jobs isn’t even a problem now so who cares. We can’t even get amaricans to fill the positions that are open now.
 

mr peabody

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The shortage of skilled workers & the stigmas of being a skilled tradesperson


Jobless claims were high again this past week with more than 860,000 people filing for unemployment benefits for the first time. Millions of people are still looking for work, but some employers say they can't find enough skilled workers for certain jobs. That is due in part, they say, because of stigmas that need to change.​
 

mr peabody

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The Fastest Routes to a Skilled Trade Job

by Daniel Bortz

Need a good job, fast? America’s skilled labor shortage means plenty of companies have skilled trade jobs sitting empty, even now. And it’s possible to get some of those jobs with less than a year of training or education. In some cases, companies will even train you on the job.

“One of the things that scares people away from a lot of jobs is the amount of education they need to have, but skilled trade jobs allow you to get trained quickly — from a six-week certificate to a two-year associate degree and everything in between,” says Laurie Grove, director of career services at Thaddeus Stevens College of Technology, a two-year technical school in Pennsylvania. “And the beauty behind a skilled trade is there’s almost a guarantee of a great job on the other end if you’re willing to put in a little time, given all of the demand.”

Long Story Short

• Training programs as short as three weeks can lead to an entry-level job.
• Paid apprenticeships provide both on-the-job training and formal instruction.
• Some jobs require only a high school diploma plus on-the-job training.

The construction industry is experiencing one of the biggest worker shortages. In a survey released in May, more than four out of five home builders (85 percent said they were facing serious labor challenges. Another industry seriously short on talent is manufacturing. Both industries have more than 300,000 job openings, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

So how do you get a skilled trade job? Often, there’s more than one route. Whether you’re just entering the job market or you’re looking to change careers, the fastest paths include training and/or certification programs, apprenticeships and on-the-job training (OJT).

Training and Certification Programs

Can’t spend two years getting an associate degree? No worries. Training programs at community colleges and trade schools will set you up to land an entry-level job in various skills-based careers, from auto mechanic to electric lineman to machinist.

The shortest programs are short. At Thaddeus Stevens College of Technology, for example, programs include Metalcasting Technology (three weeks), Production Welder (six weeks) and Facilities Maintenance Technician (12 weeks).

You can get trained in less than six months (not counting on-the-job training) for these high-paying, in-demand occupations:

Electrician
• Median salary*: $56,181
• Projected job growth: 10% from 2018 to 2028
• Training program example: Ashworth College Electrician Training Course (four-plus months)

Carpenter
• Median salary: $39,416
• Projected job growth: 8% from 2018 to 2028
• Training program example: Penn Foster Career School Carpentry Training Program (five-plus months, online)

Truck driver
• Median salary: $45,261
• Projected job growth: 5% from 2018 to 2028
• Training program example: Knight Transportation’s CDL program (six weeks)

If you’re currently employed, it’s worth asking your employer whether tuition reimbursement is available.

Some training programs lead you toward a certification or license, which a state or employer may require for certain jobs. One thing to keep in mind: “Companies may pay for you to get industry certifications,” Grove says. So if you have your eye on an expensive certification course, it might make sense to wait until you have a job with an employer who will cover the cost. Also, if you have a certain type of job in mind, talk to professionals in the field to see what certifications they recommend, Grove advises.

Outside of community colleges and traditional trade schools, fast-track training programs are cropping up to serve highly specific workforce needs that many school programs don’t address. A case in point: American Diesel Training Centers offer a three-month training course for entry-level diesel technicians, and according to the website, it has a 100% placement rate for students with perfect attendance. Best of all, students don’t pay for the training until they get a job.

Apprenticeships

Need to earn while you learn? An apprenticeship is paid work that combines on-the-job training at a company with classroom or online instruction. An apprentice “graduates” with industry-recognized credentials that can help them land a job, often at the same company. According to Apprenticeship.gov, 94% of apprentices who complete an apprenticeship get a job, and the average annual salary is impressive: $70,000.
94% of apprentices who complete an apprenticeship get a job, and the average annual salary is impressive: $70,000.

Apprenticeships are typically sponsored by a company, industry association or community college. The classroom instruction may be provided by a college, apprenticeship training school or the company itself, says Tempy Albright, skills training manager at Goodwill Industries of Northwest North Carolina, which offers free career and job-search advice to skilled trade workers.

“In some cases you don’t even have to be a student to enroll in an apprenticeship that’s sponsored by a community college,” Albright says.

Want to become an auto mechanic? There are apprenticeships for that (for example, the UAW-Ford Joint Apprentice Program). Ditto HVAC technician (Lennox International) and shipbuilder (Ingalls Apprentice School). Apprenticeships can last up to six years for the highest-skilled trades, though many are shorter (home health aide and emergency medical technician apprenticeships are one or two years). The average starting wage is $15 an hour, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Typically, wages increase over time as apprentices gain knowledge and skills.

There are many ways to find a quality apprenticeship program. A good starting point is the U.S. Department of Labor’s Apprenticeship Finder. If you’re graduating from high school, Grove suggests checking with your career counselor to learn about apprenticeships in your area.

Pre-apprenticeships

Pre-apprenticeships prepare people for an apprenticeship or even an entry-level job. For example, Home Builders Institute (HBI) offers pre-apprenticeship certificate training (PACT) for high school and post-secondary school students, veterans, transitioning military members and unemployed workers. HBI has about 10,000 graduates a year, many of whom go onto paid apprenticeship programs, says Greg Zick, assistant vice president of workforce development for the National Association of Home Builders. Students can become certified in basic carpentry, basic construction technology, electrical wiring and more.

On-the-job training

Training happens on the job for many skilled trades. In fact, for some skills-based jobs, such as mold remediation technician, construction helper, butcher and even power plant operator, OJT and a high-school diploma may be all you need.

Goodwill’s Albright says there’s no shortage of companies that offer excellent on-the-job training. After all, she notes, “Skilled trade employers are all about getting people into the workforce as quickly as possible.”

Job fairs, either virtual or in person, are a great way to find jobs that offer OJT. (One place to check for upcoming job fairs in your area is the Goodwill Career Center.) If you’re in high school or community college, ask your counselor or advisor about companies in your area that have training or technical development programs.

 

mr peabody

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WHERE HAVE ALL THE CARPENTERS GONE?!



The growing trade labor shortage is a crises that has not quite struck home yet...but it's about to. This short video from The Honest Carpenter discusses how the generational decrease in trade participation is hitting the entire construction industry, especially the carpentry trade.​
 

jpgrdnr

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Ah the great lie of Trades...I'm hard pressed to find an answer in the new economy that flies in the face of streaming in schools. I mean at this point, who gives a fuck about money? I guess in the US its all a bit different where basically you have to be rich in order to go to university, and the whole college and university system is bonkers in the US. Everything from make-your-own-degree programs to be a pro frisbee player to the intellectual elite of Harvard aka American Psycho. Trades? Trades in high school, mind my French, was for retards. Or at the very least low-income families that didn't have a lot of options. But still, we aren't talking the smartest tools in the shed. At least that's what high school taught us (i'm talking 1998, so give me some credit). And still Trades you got have some money. A truck, a trailer, tools, have a penis. I'm sorry but you want to talk about lack of gender equality look no further than construction and the trades. We are talking about guys with beards that drink a lot of beers over the weekend and think having a camp out in the woods is the pinnacle of living it up. It ain't This Old House or some sort of Vermont PBS roadshow. You want to be an Apprentice? You are basically going to be the gofer/pincushion roughneck on the site. The reality of starting out in Trades is a lot different than this La La Land BS.

Also, don't believe the lie. There are hundreds of guys with trucks and tools and all the rest of it. Tons of companies already established to do all this stuff. What new economy? The only new economy is gonna be America fixing its roads as it sinks depression era spending in infrastructure it can't possibly keep up with. And all that money is gonna go in the right pockets to the right people. You want a leg up? Forget it. Its like the picture of the old farts in suits standing around laughing their ass around "oh, they thought it was gonna trickle down..."



Fuck guys, this is history repeating itself. The whole roadshow is a scam. You've all been lied to. Except this time shit is waaay different. We've got variants with some real Contagion-like possibility. And this isn't even a superbug! I mean the Establishment might let you not wear masks and social distance in the future, but you'd be an idiot not to. We are well and truly fucked. And Biden? Is Biden gonna be superman and save the day? I think not! Maybe if you guys are lucky Trump might get back in after Biden fucks up so bad he makes Nixon look like Archie from the Archie comics.

Not to be alarmist, but y'all better start planting sweet potatoes and milking cows real fast, because this is not over by any stretch of the imagination. Manufactured food is gonna get real scarce. But thank god for automation and AI, otherwise we'd might as well be playing with sticks and stones and yammering on like cave men.

Ha! Maybe the US might have a chance if it goes Socialist for its citizens. UBI and the whole ten yards. Because the economy is sunk. If you haven't made money off of bitcoin or whatever crypto-currency or made tons off the WTI crash, you have lost the trading game. Good luck guys! Its good night and good luck! /rant
 

mr peabody

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Construction industry's worker shortage hurting housing affordability and supply

Home Builders Institute (HBI) | 20 Apr 2021

The construction industry faces a shortfall of 200,000 workers, according to a new report released today by the Home Builders Institute (HBI).

The first-ever HBI Construction Labor Market Report notes that shortages of skilled trade workers directly employed by home builders and subcontractors remain widespread throughout all regions. Builders nationwide cite the difficulty in filling positions as among their top concerns, ranking third behind high lumber prices and regulatory burdens.

"The home building industry faces a major shortage of skilled workers," said Ed Brady, HBI's president and CEO. "This persistent challenge endangers the affordability and availability of housing and hinders a robust economic recovery."

The report, based on research of the Economics Group of the National Association of Home Builders, will be issued semi-annually. The first one is compiled using year-end 2020 data. Citing more recent numbers, Brady said the total shortage of construction workers rose even higher to 309,000 in January 2021.

The share of builders reporting a worker shortage was 60 percent. The percentage is especially high relative to the acceleration for total housing starts, which increased from a seasonally adjusted annual rate of under 1 million single-family and multifamily units in April 2020 to a rate of roughly 1.5 million at the end of 2020.

The numbers reported pertain to labor directly employed by builders, though builders employ additional workers through subcontractors. "We estimate that builders subcontract more than 80 percent of the construction in the typical home they build," said Brady. "And worker shortages for subcontractors continue to be even more severe."

HBI's chief executive stressed that labor represents approximately 30 to 40 percent of the cost of a typical new home. "That share of the costs is rising, due to the shortage of available labor," he said. "When you consider that scarcity of labor causes construction delays, which then creates further costs, you can see how both housing supply and affordability are negatively affected."

HBI is the nation's largest provider of training for skilled workers for the residential construction industry. The nonprofit trains approximately 10,000 students each year through an industry-recognized curriculum in 220 sites around the U.S., including in high schools, military bases, community colleges, prisons, training facilities and Job Corps centers.

"As a nation, we need to build the next generation of skilled tradespeople," Brady said. "That means recruiting more women. It means training and placing minority, lower income, and at-risk youth for job opportunities as an important way to fight against social inequity. It means providing trade skills education to veterans and transitioning military. And it means reaching out to high school students, and those who influence their decisions, to change their perception of careers in the trades," said Brady.

About Home Builders Institute (HBI)
The Home Builders Institute (HBI) trains skilled workers for the building industry. Through pre-apprenticeship training, certification programs and job placement services, HBI provides graduates with the skills and experience they need to build a career and change their lives. For more information, please visit www.hbi.org.

 
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