NEWS: [News.com.au] 18/03/2005 - 'Private school teachers at LSD party'

hoptis

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Private school teachers at LSD party
By Nigel Hunt
March 18, 2005

FOUR teachers at Whyalla's prestigious St John's College in South Australia have been apprehended by police after an LSD drug party.

One of the teachers, a man, 23, was reported for supplying a prohibited substance – LSD or lysergic acid diethylamide, a hallucinogenic drug – and will appear in court next month.

Three other teachers – two men aged 37 and 34, and a woman, 26 – have been placed in a drug diversion program for treatment and rehabilitation.

While the 23-year-old teacher facing the drug charges has been suspended, the remaining three were allowed to continue teaching this week. One of them holds a senior position at the school and is involved in its management team.

The trio will next week meet the director of Catholic Education at Port Pirie, Kathy McEvoy, and St Johns Principal Charlie Allen, to explain their actions. Ms McEvoy said yesterday no students were involved. "Three of the four teachers allegedly involved . . . were recent recruits to the school," she said.

The incident has rocked the Whyalla community, with Mayor Jim Pollock yesterday saying he was "shocked" and called for a full inquiry.

"This is a very serious allegation," he said. "If there are four teachers involved in this, a full inquiry by the Catholic Education Office has to be made. If four teachers have been involved in some sort of drug taking, then it would be my thoughts the four of them should be stood down until the investigations are completed and the matters cleared."

Whyalla police acting Chief Inspector Graeme Adcock yesterday confirmed one man had been reported for drug offences and three other people placed in a diversion program.

Police were alerted to an incident at a Whyalla house on Saturday night after an ambulance was called when a man suffered a severe reaction, allegedly from taking the drug.
From News.com.au

Suspension and criminal charges? These teachers should be applauded for calling an ambulance and staying at the scene when someone got sick taking the drug. Instead, it's probably cost them their careers.
 

BigTrancer

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WOW. They said that right in the news paper too. Way to deter people from calling the ambulance in a drug-related emergency :(:(:(

BigTrancer.
 

phase_dancer

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IMO, that was very very naughty of the ambulance officials to state such details to the Police. Future incidents could have more dire outcomes.

After this fiasco, if you were a bunch of officials partying hard (as they do ;)) would you act immediately to such a situation, or would you tend to turn towards other trippers for assistance?

The potential gamble being; someones life against others' reputations.

Notifying police on certain details is probably important, but if this procedure is to be immediately followed up as in this case, it's very likely to send out entirely the wrong message.

As for the Catholic Church; I've known a few very high ranked teachers in similar institutions that have played up in this fashion. If you want them to be role models, let them have fun. Otherwise, like a celibate in a whorehouse, temptation will always be there.
 

aunty establishment

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Police were alerted to an incident at a Whyalla house on Saturday night after an ambulance was called
The way I read this, another incident happened at the house _after_ an ambulance had been called? AFAIK ambulances don't notify the police unless they are at risk themselves.
 

MaDMAn_Project

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We are talking about Whyalla though it's pretty redneck, once them ambos got talking on the radio the police would've heard drug overdose and gone to have a look.

One day we'll be telling our kids about the old days when we had civil liberties...
 

babel

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www.news.com.au
The incident has rocked the Whyalla community, with Mayor Jim Pollock yesterday saying he was "shocked" and called for a full inquiry.
Everyday people exploring their conciousness in their own (private) time... shock horror! 8o 8)


"LSD is a drug that occasionally causes psychotic behavior in people who have not taken it."
 

doofhard

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I remember a few years back after I left school I saw my Yr 11 English teacher at a Psy event tripping of his balls as was I at first I was scared top go up and say something but then I jsut went up and had a chat.

I've seen him at a few things since then, I thought it was kind of cool because he was one of the teachers that had a big influence on me, in a good way. He, like most people who take LSD do it to open up the mind.
 

akkeri

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The incident has rocked the Whyalla community, with Mayor Jim Pollock yesterday saying he was "shocked" and called for a full inquiry.
what an overreaction. in situations like this it's hard to know who's inflaming the situation more -- the papers or the local community.

:X
 

charlesbronson

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Yeah that is pretty surprising if the ambulance officers were responsible for notifying the police; I always understood that ambulance officers don't notify police (more accurately, they aren't OBLIGED to) in emergencies relating to illicit drug use unless someone has died as a result. Which is fair enough.

It's also an integral harm reduction strategy, like heaps of you folks have said above, giving people more cause to worry about the health of their companion instead of how much shit they will get from the police if they hang around....what silly bastards, whoever it was that got the cops involved.

Better to see trippin teachers rather than alcohol or nicotine addict teachers though IMO, hehehe maybe if they are all members of the Visual Arts Faculty they can say it was an intensive group planning session for Monday's class, kind of like this.
 

chugs

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where does it say in the bible that its a sin to drop acid?

anyway more to the point how depressing. Its almost 1984ish
have been placed in a drug diversion program for treatment and rehabilitation.
what is bad about their behaviour. Who have they killed. What have they stolen and where is the hurt in what they did.

its fucking disgusting how society treats people
 

Nice Tits

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It used to say on the queensland health service website - on a page that i tried to find yesterday but appears to have been taken down - that in queensland - if the ambulance is called in relation to a drug issue the ambulance is required by law to inform the police.

However the page went on to say that if the ambulance was called to say someone that had collapsed and it turned out that when the ambulance got there it was a drug overdose, the ambulance did not have to involve the police.

So police only needed to be involved if the person ringing 000 told the operator it was a drug overdose. In queensland anyways. I have no idea if this is australia wide or not - or if this was an old law that no longer applies as i can no longer find my source.

Can someone confirm this?

Nice Tits
 

Nice Tits

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Where are the articles about the teachers that go down to the pub on the weekend and have a bit too much to drink? Whats the difference?

Nice tits
 

Bent

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chugs said:
where does it say in the bible that its a sin to drop acid?

anyway more to the point how depressing. Its almost 1984ish

what is bad about their behaviour. Who have they killed. What have they stolen and where is the hurt in what they did.

its fucking disgusting how society treats people
That's unfortunately not the point. Not withstanding the fact that its a definite worry the cops were called, taking LSD is illegal. And as teachers, society (in my mind reasonably) puts a lot of responsibility on them...after all, these are the people who are shaping the future. And as drugs are illegal, society can reasonably argue they weren't being very responsible.

Right or wrong as that may be isn't the point...the fact it their action is illegal, and therefore people in power are of course going to condemn their actions.
 

nickthecheese

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Wow, call the ambos, potentially save a life and get chucked in jail. :( Or, like that woman in sydney who DIDN't call the ambos when her husband had a G overdose and get chucked in jail for neglegence :( anyway! F$%K, you just can't win in this day and age. just wait till they have millimeter wave scanning towers installed on every streetcorner and you can be busted on the spot for what you have in your pocket....{1984}
 

ozbreaker

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^^ Exactly.

How many people will die now because people afre too scared to call the ambulance. In the one time i was in a situation like this it was a hard enough call to make without considering the idea of police getting involved.

I'm still curious how the police found out. I'm willing to put money on someone breaking patient confidentiality as they were morally outraged by the act of teacher indulging in their private time.
 

Flexistentialist

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Nice Tits said:
It used to say on the queensland health service website - on a page that i tried to find yesterday but appears to have been taken down - that in queensland - if the ambulance is called in relation to a drug issue the ambulance is required by law to inform the police.

However the page went on to say that if the ambulance was called to say someone that had collapsed and it turned out that when the ambulance got there it was a drug overdose, the ambulance did not have to involve the police.

So police only needed to be involved if the person ringing 000 told the operator it was a drug overdose. In queensland anyways. I have no idea if this is australia wide or not - or if this was an old law that no longer applies as i can no longer find my source.

Can someone confirm this?

Nice Tits
That's not correct. In QLD, like other states in Australia, the police should only be called to a drug related ambulance call-out if there is a risk of violence towards the ambulance officers.

This could include a history of violence at the address, or possibly if the call involved lots of hysterical screaming which left the operator unsure of the safety of the ambos.
 
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