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News METH | Meth overdoses surpassing heroin deaths ->

mr peabody

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End your meth addiction with ibogaine

The first and most important requirement is that you have to be 100% ready to be done with drugs, that you are mentally, emotionally, spiritually and physically ready to fully surrender yourself and accept plant medicine healing in your life. You have to know what you want and mean it. Ibogaine will work for you only if you are ready.

If you are not ready to take full responsibility over your life and choices, then ibogaine treatment is not for you.

The second requirement is you have to do this for yourself, not your loved ones, friend or family member. If a loved one is pushing you into treatment or your family has done an intervention but you are not quite ready, you need to wait until you are doing the program for yourself.

The third requirement is that you understand that ibogaine is not a cure for addiction. Instead, it merely interrupts addition. You have to prepare yourself to let go of old patterns, behaviors, and environmental and social factors that have led you to your addiction. If you come into ibogaine treatment expecting that ibogaine will do all the hard work for you, then your sobriety will only be temporary.

You will have to take what you learn during your treatment program and apply it to life once you get home. You will go through an adjustment period afterwards, and that requires making the right decisions and taking action.

At the heart of all addictions, it first began on a spiritual and emotional level. This is also why many rehabilitation programs such as the twelve-step program are unsuccessful in the long term because traditional detox therapies only work to heal the physical level, where the current rate of success is about 1% - 7%. Too many people who have been through these expensive and ineffective programs end up with a sense of despair, and even a sense of personal failure. Most rehabilitation centers and western society in general, are not aware that humans exist in 3 worlds: physical, mental and spiritual. While there are on-going support groups for addicts trying to kick their habit, withdrawal can be so overwhelming that attempts to discontinue the drug often end in failure.

Physically ibogaine works to relieve symptoms of withdrawal. Patients who have used ibogaine to treat drug addiction report a complete absence of physical symptoms once treatment is over. Ibogaine works by resetting neurotransmitters in the brain. It also works as a psycho-spiritual tool that helps the patient look deeply into their past to find the root problem of their addiction. Addicts are usually victims of deep emotional traumas who are seeking to find an escape of this through their drug of choice. The key to breaking your addiction is understanding this:

Ibogaine takes you on a deep introspective psychological journey that allows you to forgive others who have hurt you as well as forgive yourself for things you have done that you regret and continue to carry with you.

Ibogaine therapy can provide individuals with critical insights into the origins of their addiction. This is the key to full recovery: digging up and reviewing the roots of addiction. These profound realizations contribute to full recovery and a deep new found appreciation for ones life. Once the iboga has broken your addiction, the next step is to rebuild the body and mind with nutritional medicine and supplements. It is this extra step that can increase the chances of a lifelong recovery from addiction. While ibogaine is not successful 100% of the time, estimates from various clinics range between 60% to 70% in terms of the number of people who successfully use iboga to get off drugs permanently, which, let's face it, is amazing.

Ibogaine is the ONLY substance known to alleviate the withdrawal symptoms associated with meth addiction. But for people who return to the same environment they abused meth, there is a 90 percent relapse rate.

The difference between success or failure will depend on whether you are

1. Committed to the process of recovery
2. Committed to removing yourself from your previous environment

Dr. Bruno Chaves has performed over 1200 treatments with ibogaine in hospital without a single adverse event. 62% of those treated remain abstinent long term. Dr. Chaves is currently accepting new patients for treatment in hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. For more information, contact Dr. Chaves : [email protected] -pb
 

mr peabody

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Practical strategies for families struggling with addiction

by Louise Stanger EdD LCSW | The FIX | 10 Nov 2020

This book will help you better understand what your loved one is going through while also offering realistic advice for approaching their addiction and how it affects your entire family.

We all have steps we can take to remediate, to change and transform.

Today I write from my heart based on my clinical knowledge and research in the behavioral health field and my own years of field experience. My latest book, Addiction in The Family: Helping Families Navigate Challenges, Emotions and Recovery is the guidebook I wish I had when I was first learning about substance use (addiction and mental health disorders) when I was a young woman.

Addiction and mental health are subjects that are close to my heart so much so that when the phone rings I always answer. Most of the time on the other end is a concerned person calling because they just don't know how to respond to a loved one or client who is spiraling out of control due to a substance use disorder.

I know those feelings because I grew up in a family where one never knew what would happen next, as addiction, mental illness, tragedy, and trauma prevailed.

When I was approached to write this book about substance use disorders and the family, I felt energized, honored, and humbled. Little did I know that I would be writing in the midst of a global pandemic and widespread racial and civil unrest. Both matters have great consequences, and not unlike addiction, can hold one hostage. However, we all have steps we can take to remediate, to change and transform.

Truth is, I was highly motivated to write—to make a difference. And now that it's written, I wish that someone could had given me this book when I was struggling to figure out what was going on in my own family, and provided me with guideposts that were easy to understand and use. I am humbled and grateful that I am able to do this for others through Addiction in the Family.

This book is Family Focused and practical in that it teaches one how to set boundaries, deal with strong emotions, and teach you the best ways to communicate with your loved one. It is hopeful and full of real-life examples to help you understand your experience.

The book is divided in to six easy-to-read chapters, which I invite you to skim or skip around. Each chapter is self-contained, offering education, real-life vignettes, talking points, and an easy self-care activity to try. The vignettes are based on real clients I have worked with, yet all personal information, names, and identifying characteristics have been changed to preserve and protect their privacy and confidentiality.

Chapter 1 explains what substance use disorders are and how they affect everybody. In chapter 2, we'll discuss the many behaviors and family roles that one may assume in the face of a substance use disorder. Here we'll explore the addictions arsenal of denial, blame, manipulation, and secrets, as well as the differences between codependency and prodependence, as we learn how to empower our loved ones in healthy ways.

Exploring treatment options is a mighty task. There are so many different options, and it's hard to know which is the right path to take. Chapter 3 will help you discover the many options available, and the benefits of consulting with an unbiased professional to help you make the right decision. We'll also explore ways to talk with a loved one about seeking help.

We all know life is messy; it's no surprise that the road to recovery is likewise full of speed bumps, hiccups, and green, yellow, and red lights. Chapter 4 offers insights as to the meaning of recovery, the emotional roadblocks to recovery, and how to grow as a family member and best support your loved one. Chapter 5 discusses the importance of self-care in the midst of a loved one's substance use disorder, and how to incorporate self-care into daily living. Finally, chapter 6 celebrates the hard work you and your loved one are doing, and sets the stage for building resiliency, celebrating yourself, and discovering joy.

Along the way, you'll be invited to experiment with some effective self-care activities, ranging from developing a gratitude practice, hitting pause, taking five, and breathing, to mindful meditation, walking, journaling, and being of service.

While Addiction in the Family focuses primarily on substance use disorders, it is also relevant for those whose loved ones experience process disorders (for example, digital, shopping, gambling, eating, or sex addictions), as well as those who experience co-occurring mental health disorders.

Thank you for reading, I am honored and humbled that you stopped by today. I invite you to share your journey with me. Please contact me at 619-507-1699, [email protected]. You have my word that I will always greet you with kindness and professionalism. It is my goal to inform, inspire, education, and help your family heal.

Addiction in the Family is available on Amazon.

 

mr peabody

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Why a drug that fueled the Nazi war machine now plagues America

by Richard Gunderman | The Conversation | 10 Feb 2020

Although I am teaching a course at Indiana University this semester on the opioid epidemic, I can’t get meth out of my mind.

A colleague of mine was recently carjacked. He was forced to drive at extreme speed through the city and escaped with his life only by intentionally crashing his car. My colleague told me he believes his gun-wielding assailant was suffering an acute psychosis related to meth use.

Opioids may get most of the media attention these days, but meth has hardly gone away. Law enforcement seizures of meth are surging in the U.S., up 142% between 2017 and 2018. Overdose deaths in 2017 were seven times higher than in 2007.

Just what is meth, and why is it such a grave threat to health?

The health effects of meth

Methamphetamine, a powerful stimulant of the central nervous system, has some legitimate medical uses, such as the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. But it is widely trafficked and purchased for recreational consumption, often as crystal meth.

Recreational meth users smoke, snort, ingest or inject the drug. Smoking and injection seem to give the greatest rush, but the effect doesn’t last as long. Users often report euphoria, increased alertness and reduced appetite; chronic users may experience paranoia, delusions and unpredictable mood swings. Addicts may exhibit a “binge and crash” pattern, and many try to maintain the rush with continuous consumption.

Chances of addiction are high, and symptoms from withdrawal can linger for months. Treatment is complicated, particularly because many meth users are often also using cocaine, heroin or alcohol.

Meth is directly toxic to the brain; developmental delays are common in meth babies. In adults, it’s associated with an increased risk for Parkinson’s disease. Addicts age at an accelerated pace, and commonly acquire “meth mouth” – tooth loss, tooth decay and tooth blackening.

Those who overdose may develop psychosis or abnormal heart rhythms. Unlike opioid overdoses, which can quickly be resolved if the drug Naloxone is available, meth overdoses have no “reversal” agent. Instead, the meth is suctioned from the stomach. Anti-psychotics can help with psychosis, and anti-hypertensive drugs can reduce acutely elevated blood pressure.

Meth’s dark history

During World War II, meth played a sinister role in the Nazi war machine.

The military, along with German civilians, used a commercial form of the drug – made in Berlin and marketed under the trade name Pervitin – to stay awake, alert and energized.

With Pervitin, factory workers and homemakers alike found they could work longer and harder. Troops called it “tank chocolate” or “pilot’s salt.” Pervitin fueled the Nazis during their “blitzkrieg” invasion of France in 1940.

Wrote one German commander about Pervitin: “Everyone fresh and cheerful, excellent discipline.” Later his assessment became less rosy: “After taking four tablets, double vision and seeing colors.”

The toll meth took on the Germans was immense. It provoked war crimes, stoked psychosis and triggered suicide.

As the war progressed, Adolf Hitler received ever-increasing doses of the drug.

No one should be surprised. After all, the German name Pervitin is related to the word pervert (“ill-turned”). It means corrupted or distorted. Meth, as the Nazis discovered, distorts our nature and turns us away from what we are meant to be.

Now, 75 years after the war, and still without an effective drug therapy, a meaningful response to meth requires three things. We in the U.S. must recognize the true scope of the problem. We must make sure meth users have access to counseling and behavioral therapy.

Most of all, our society needs to help individuals and families discover healthier ways to find meaning in life.

*From the article here: https://theconversation.com/a-nazi-...th-is-making-a-disturbing-reappearance-129593





Nazis dosed their soldiers with performance-boosting superdrug*

by Mindy Weisberger | LIVE SCIENCE | 25 June 2019

The remarkable endurance of German and Allied soldiers during World War II had a secret ingredient: performance-enhancing drugs.

During the 1940s, Nazi troops were liberally supplied with a methamphetamine called Pervitin, while American and British soldiers stayed alert with the help of the amphetamine Benzedrine.

Medical officers on both sides distributed these stimulants — and others, such as cocaine — to keep weary soldiers awake for days at a time; to enable troops to perform longer under punishing conditions; and to deaden the horrific and debilitating effects of shell shock and PTSD.

As this officially sanctioned "pharmaceutical arms race" unfolded, soldiers who took these drugs were pushed beyond the limits of their normal capabilities; but the long-term impacts of drug use were largely ignored by military medical officials, PBS representatives said in a statement.

Amphetamines affect the central nervous system, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). They induce a sense of euphoria, increase alertness and decrease appetite, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) reported. For meth, more of the drug in a single dose directly floods the brain, as compared with other amphetamines, meaning meth is longer-lasting and potentially more harmful to the central nervous system, according to NIDA.

"Drugged, fearless and berserk"

The German methamphetamine Pervitin was initially marketed in the 1930s as a recreational pick-me-up, and scientists were experimenting with Pervitin before the war to see how long student users could stay awake and still perform well on exams, said World War II historian and documentary consultant James Holland.


Pervitin, a form of crystal meth, was distributed to German soldiers
by military medical officials during World War II.


By 1940, Pervitin was widely distributed among pilots in the Luftwaffe (the Nazi air force) to prime them for the rigors of long missions, or to ward off sleeplessness and hunger if their planes were shot down, Holland told Live Science.

That was the year of the Blitz — the Nazis' relentless and devastating bombing attack against Britain — an initiative fueled by massive quantities of speed, Holland said.

Records from the British War Office estimated that over the three months of the Blitz — from April to June 1940 — about 35 million Pervitin tablets were sent to 3 million German soldiers, seamen and pilots, Nicolas Rasmussen, a professor in the School of Humanities and Languages at the University of New South Wales in Australia, reported in 2011 in The Journal of Interdisciplinary History.

Following this infusion of drugs, Wehrmacht soldiers (as the troops in Nazi Germany were called) marched and fought for 10 consecutive days, trapping and defeating the British army at Dunkirk in a decisive military victory, PBS representatives said in the statement.

In Britain, rumors swirled about dive-bombing Nazi pilots with a superhuman resistance to g-forces through drugs, and newspapers described sightings of German paratroopers who were "heavily drugged, fearless and berserk," according to Rasmussen.

"By the end of the second World War, you saw increasing knowledge of the side effects of these drugs. What you don't see is what to do with people once they become hooked — that's something that had to be learned the hard way in the years that followed," Holland told Live Science.

"The full extent of addiction and how harmful they can be was not properly understood," Holland says. "At the end of the war, there was very little help offered for people who became addicted."

*From the article here: https://www.livescience.com/65788-world-war-ii-nazis-methamphetamines.html





How meth became a key part of Nazi military strategy

by Peter Andreas | Time | 7 Jan 2020

In The Art of War, Sun Tzu wrote "speed is the essence of war.” While he of course did not have amphetamines in mind, he would no doubt have been impressed by their powerful war-facilitating psychoactive effects.

Amphetamines are a group of synthetic drugs that stimulate the central nervous system, reducing fatigue and appetite and increasing wakefulness and a sense of well-being. The quintessential drug of the modern industrial age, amphetamines arrived relatively late in the history of mind-altering substances—commercialized just in time for mass consumption during World War II by the leading industrial powers. That war was not only the most destructive war in human history but also the most pharmacologically enhanced. It was literally sped up by speed.

Few drugs have received a bigger stimulus from war. As Lester Grinspoon and Peter Hedblom wrote in their classic 1975 study The Speed Culture, “World War II probably gave the greatest impetus to date to legal medically authorized as well as illicit black market abuse of these pills on a worldwide scale.”

Japanese, American and British forces consumed large amounts of amphetamines, but the Germans were the most enthusiastic early adopters, pioneering pill-popping on the battlefield during the initial phases of the war.

Nazi ideology was fundamentalist in its antidrug stance. Social use of drugs was considered both a sign of personal weakness and a symbol of the country’s moral decay in the wake of a traumatic and humiliating defeat in World War I.

But as Norman Ohler shows in Blitzed: Drugs in Nazi Germany, meth was the privileged exception. While other drugs were banned or discouraged, meth was touted as a miracle product when it appeared on the market in the late 1930s. Indeed, the little pill was the perfect Nazi drug: “Germany, awake!” the Nazis had commanded. Energizing and confidence boosting, meth played into the Third Reich’s obsession with physical and mental superiority. In sharp contrast to drugs such as heroin or alcohol, meth were not about escapist pleasure. Rather, they were taken for hyper-alertness and vigilance. Aryans, who were the embodiment of human perfection in Nazi ideology, could now even aspire to be superhuman—and such superhumans could be turned into supersoldiers. “We don’t need weak people,” Hitler declared, “We want only the strong!” Weak people took drugs such as opium to escape; strong people took meth to feel even stronger.

The German chemist Friedrich Hauschild had been aware of the American amphetamine Benzedrine ever since the drug has been used as a doping product in the Olympic Games in Berlin in 1936. The following year he managed to synthesize methamphetamine, a close cousin of amphetamine, while working for Temmler-Werke, a Berlin-based pharmaceutical company. Temmler-Werke began selling meth under the brand name Pervitin in the winter of 1937. Partly thanks to the company’s aggressive advertising campaign, Pervitin became well known within a few months. The tablets were wildly popular and could be purchased without a prescription in pharmacies. One could even buy boxed chocolates spiked with meth. But the drug’s most important use was yet to come.

Dr. Otto F. Ranke, director of the Research Institute of Defense Physiology, had high hopes that Pervitin would prove advantageous on the battlefield. His goal was to defeat the enemy with chemically enhanced soldiers, soldiers who could give Germany a military edge by fighting harder and longer than their opponents. After testing the drug on a group of medical officers, Ranke believed the Pervitin would be “an excellent substance for rousing a weary squad…We may grasp what far-reaching military significance it would have if we managed to remove the natural tiredness using medical methods.”

Ranke himself was a daily user, as detailed in his wartime medical diary and letters: “With Pervitin you can go on working for 36 to 50 hours without feeling any noticeable fatigue.” This allowed Ranke to work days at a time with no sleep. And his correspondence indicated that a growing number of officers were doing the same thing—popping pills to manage the demands of their jobs.

Wehrmacht medical officers administered Pervitin to soldiers of the Third Tank Division during the occupation of Czecholslovakia in 1938. But the invasion of Poland in September 1939 served as the first real military test of the drug in the field. Germany overran its eastern neighbor by October, with 100,000 Polish soldiers killed in the attack. The invasion introduced a new form of industrialized warfare, Blitzkrieg. This “lightning war” emphasized speed and surprise, catching the enemy off guard by the unprecedented quickness of the mechanized attack and advance. The weak link in the Blitzkrieg strategy was the soldiers, who were humans rather than machines and as such suffered from fatigue. They required regular rest and sleep, which, of course, slowed down the military advance. That is where Pervitin came in—part of the speed of the Blitzkrieg literally came from speed. As medical historian Peter Steinkamp puts it, “Blitzkrieg was guided by meth, if not to say founded on meth.”

In late 1939 and early 1940, Leo Conti, the “Reich Health Führer,” and others sounded the alarm bells about the risk of Pervitin, resulting in the drug being made available by prescription only. But these warnings largely fell on deaf ears, and the new regulations were widely ignored. Use of the drug continued to grow. At the Temmler-Werke factory, production revved into overdrive, pressing as many as 833,000 tablets per day. Between April and July 1940, German servicemen received more than 35 million methamphetamine tablets. The drug was even dispensed to pilots and tank crews in the form of chocolate bars known as Fliegerschokolade (flyer’s chocolate) and Panzerschokolade (tanker’s chocolate).

Armies had long consumed various psychoactive substances, but this was the first large-scale use of a synthetic performance-enhancing drug. Historian Shelby Stanton comments: “They dispensed it to the line troops. Ninety percent of their army had to march on foot, day and night. It was more important for them to keep punching during the Blitzkrieg than to get a good night’s sleep. The whole damn army was hopped up. It was one of the secrets of Blitzkrieg.”

The Blitzkreig depended on speed, relentlessly pushing ahead with tank troops, day and night. In April 1940, it quickly led to the fall of Denmark and Norway. The next month, the troops moved on to Holland, Belgium, and finally France. German tanks covered 240 miles of challenging terrain, including the Ardennes Forest, in 11 days, bypassing the entrenched British and French forces, who had mistakenly assumed the Ardennes was impassable. Paratroopers sometimes landed ahead of the advance, causing chaos behind enemy lines; the British press described these soldiers as “heavily drugged, fearless and berserk.”

General Heinz Guderian, an expert in tank warfare and leader of the invasion, gave the order to speed ahead to the French border: “I demand that you go sleepless for at least three nights if that should be necessary.” When they crossed into France, French reinforcements had yet to arrive, and their defenses were overwhelmed by the German attack.

I was dumbfounded,” Churchill wrote in his memoirs. “I had never expected to have to face…the overrunning of the whole communications and countryside by an irresistible incursion of armoured vehicles…I admit it was one of the greatest surprises I have had in my life.” The speed of the attack was jaw-dropping. High on Pervitin, German tank and artillery drivers covered ground night and day, almost without stopping. Foreign commanders and civilians alike were caught entirely off guard.

Some users reported negative side effects of the drug. During the French invasion, these included a lieutenant colonel with the Panzer Ersatz Division I, who experienced heart pains after taking Pervitin four times daily for as many weeks; the commander of the Twelfth Tank Division, who rushed to a military hospital due to the heart attacked he suffered an hour after taking one pill; and several officers who suffered heart attacks while off duty after taking Pervitin.

Amid growing worries about the addictive potential and negative side effects of overusing the drug, the German military began to cut back on allocations of meth by the end of 1940. Consumption declined sharply in 1941 and 1942, when the medical establishment formally acknowledged that amphetamines were addictive.

Nevertheless, the drug continued to be dispensed on both the western and eastern fronts. Temmler-Wenke, the maker of the drug, remained as profitable as ever, despite rising awareness of meth's negative health effects.

Adapted from Killer High: A History of War in Six Drugs by Peter Andreas

 
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mr peabody

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Methamphetamine overdose deaths rise sharply nationwide

JAMA Psychiatry | National Institutes of Health

Methamphetamine overdose deaths surged in an eight-year period in the United States, according to a study that will published today in JAMA Psychiatry. The analysis revealed rapid rises across all racial and ethnic groups, but American Indians and Alaska Natives had the highest death rates overall. The research was conducted at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health.

Deaths involving methamphetamines more than quadrupled among non-Hispanic American Indians and Alaska Natives from 2011-2018 overall, with sharp increases for both men and women in that group. The findings highlight the urgent need to develop culturally tailored, gender-specific prevention and treatment strategies for methamphetamine use disorder to meet the unique needs of those who are most vulnerable to the growing overdose crisis. Long-term decreased access to education, high rates of poverty and discrimination in the delivery of health services are among factors thought to contribute to health disparities for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

“While much attention is focused on the opioid crisis, a methamphetamine crisis has been quietly, but actively, gaining steam—particularly among American Indians and Alaska Natives, who are disproportionately affected by a number of health conditions,” said Nora D. Volkow, M.D., NIDA director and a senior author of the study. “American Indian and Alaska Native populations experience structural disadvantages but have cultural strengths that can be leveraged to prevent methamphetamine use and improve health outcomes for those living with addiction.”

Shared decision-making between patient and health care provider and a holistic approach to wellness are deeply rooted traditions among some American Indian and Alaska Native groups and exist in the Indian health care system. Traditional practices, such as talking circles, in which all members of a group can provide an uninterrupted perspective, and ceremonies, such as smudging, have been integrated into the health practices of many Tribal communities. Leveraging traditions may offer a unique and culturally resonant way to promote resilience to help prevent drug use among young people. Development and implementation of other culturally appropriate and community-based prevention; targeting youth and families with positive early intervention strategies; and provider and community education may also aid prevention efforts among this population.

The study found markedly high death rates among non-Hispanic American Indians and Alaska Natives, as well as a pattern of higher overdose death rates in men compared to women within each racial/ethnic group. However, non-Hispanic American Indian and Alaska Native women had higher rates than non-Hispanic Black, Asian, or Hispanic men during 2012-2018, underscoring the exceptionally high overdose rates in American Indian and Alaska Native populations. The results also revealed that non-Hispanic Blacks had the sharpest increases in overdose death rates during 2011-2018. This represents a worrying trend in a group that had previously experienced very low rates of methamphetamine overdose deaths.

Methamphetamine use is linked to a range of serious health risks, including overdose deaths. Unlike for opioids, there are currently no FDA-approved medications for treating methamphetamine use disorder or reversing overdoses. However, behavioral therapies such as contingency management therapy can be effective in reducing harms associated with use of the drug, and a recent clinical trial reported significant therapeutic benefits with the combination of naltrexone with bupropion in patients with methamphetamine use disorders.

Recent national data show that most people who use methamphetamine are between 25 and 54 years old, so the investigators limited their analysis to this age group. When they examined data from this population as a whole, they found a surge in overdose deaths. Deaths involving meth rose from 2 to 10 per 100,000 men, and from 1 to 5 per 100,000 women. This represents a more than five-fold increase from 2011 to 2018.

“Identifying populations that have a higher rate of methamphetamine overdose is a crucial step toward curbing the underlying methamphetamine crisis,” said Dr. Han. “By focusing on the unique needs of individuals and developing culturally tailored interventions, we can begin to move away from one-size-fits-all approaches and toward more effective, tailored interventions.”

 

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Powerful new form of meth ravaging the US*

By Timothy Williams | New York Times

Home deliveries from the local food bank now require a police escort. A shop owner has started to carrying her gun to work. And the local constable, who rarely ever had to pull his weapon in the past, has drawn it a dozen times over the past year. All because people hooked on meth have threatened them.

For years, opioid addiction ravaged Louisa, KY and its neighbors in Appalachia. But the sudden return of meth — in a powerful new form — has brought a sharply different set of problems to this small Kentucky town on the West Virginia border.

If pain pills left residents struggling to help many family members deal with the risk of overdose, meth has bred fear and division in the community of 2,500, as a growing number of users have begun living on the streets.

“Half the people want to take them to the river and tie something around their neck,” said the town’s mayor, Harold Slone, adding, “We hadn’t seen that level of anger before.”

Opioids, heroin and fentanyl remain abundant, cheap and deadly in this part of Kentucky. In 2017, the rate of fatal opioid overdoses in the state was nearly twice the national average. But the sudden abundance of meth reflects a new reality in Louisa and elsewhere: A very public push to end opioid abuse has unwittingly ushered in the return of crystal meth.

In Concord, N.H., which was ravaged by opioids, the police say meth now accounts for 60 percent of all drug seizures. In Texas, Hawaii, Oklahoma and Colorado, overdoses from methamphetamine surpassed those from opioids in 2018. And in Mississippi late last year, the police discovered 140 pounds of meth in one of that state’s largest drug busts.

“Meth, that’s our drug now,” said Dennis Lowe, commander of a law enforcement task force in central and southeastern Ohio, which was also a center of the opioid epidemic. “In the past, it was easy for us to find opioids for sale on the street. Now we have to go look for it. With meth, users are walking around with ounces of it, where a few years ago, it might have been a gram or two.”

Doctors and hospitals have unwittingly accelerated the switch to methamphetamine by significantly reducing their patients’ access to pain medication; opioid users, increasingly fearful about overdosing on heroin and fentanyl, have been desperate for a substitute.

A powerful Mexican organized crime syndicate, the Sinaloa drug cartel, has sought to fill the vacuum by targeting Appalachia, federal drug officials say. The traffickers follow the same business model that allowed them to inundate the nation with heroin: make meth potent and sell it cheap to ensure a steady customer base, and ultimately, mass addiction.



The inexpensive, purer class of meth now available in many places is so powerful that some people who have used it say it caused extended hallucinations, leading them to commit serious crimes, or lose track of time altogether.

“There are no memories — it’s just ‘high time,’” said Dakota Scott, 32, a recovering drug user who lives near Louisa. She said much of her recall had been blotted out after she used methamphetamine. “It makes you feel like you can do anything. You’re invincible.”

But the drug exacts a devastating psychological toll on chronic users and substantially shortens their lives because of the strain it places on the heart and circulatory system. It can also lead to sleeplessness and intense paranoia. Users often scar their faces and arms because they feel itchy and scratch themselves.

In Louisa, where a drug rehabilitation center called Addiction Recovery Care has become one of the largest private employers in town, the number of opioid deaths has been on the decline, according to state data, as the use of pain pills and heroin has diminished.

But Tim Robinson, the center’s chief executive, feared that the drop might lead to a loss of federal and state treatment money, just as it is needed to combat the growing meth crisis. Kentucky’s expansion of Medicaid in 2014 helped fund Addiction Recovery Care’s growth; it operates outpatient and inpatient medical and counseling services and houses recovering drug users.

“We need to understand that some of our success is because we have just changed the crisis, and meth doesn’t kill people as quick. There’s a really strong fear that we’re going to declare victory and back off when we should be doubling down, because it’s about to be a whole lot worse,” Mr. Robinson said.

The region where Kentucky meets Ohio and West Virginia has served as a harbinger of national drug trends. Pain pills like OxyContin, stimulants known as bath salts, prescription anti-anxiety medications like Xanax and, more recently, heroin and fentanyl were all adopted by drug users here before gaining wider use nationally.

Pain pills have been popular in the region since at least the 1960s, when coal miners began to use them to help cope with their grueling work. In 2011, Kentucky doctors wrote 137 opioid prescriptions for every 100 residents, far higher than the national average.

Methamphetamine has also been available in Appalachia for decades, but until recently, it had been mostly made in backyards and basements and varied widely in strength.

But the new Mexican variant is often mixed with cocaine, and increasingly, with fentanyl. Law enforcement officials said cartels mix in those ingredients because fentanyl is inexpensive to produce, enhances the effects of meth and appears to cause faster addiction.

Meth users around Louisa sometimes add their own dangerous ingredients, including wasp repellent, which users say produces a more intense high.

Kentucky State Police officer Michael Murriell said "police officers have become more wary when making traffic stops or when approaching people — a conspicuous change from their interactions with pain pill abusers, who rarely argued or resisted arrest."

“Everything we do is different now,”
he said. “We have to be more careful.”



State police said that in some communities around Louisa, nearly eight in 10 arrests are related to meth use. The local court docket is full of meth-related crimes — mostly shoplifting, burglary or assault, but occasionally attempted murder.

The seat of Lawrence County, Louisa is similar to many small towns in the rolling hills of Eastern Kentucky. Some of the nearby coal mines still operate, though many have been abandoned for years, their massive belt conveyor equipment left to rust amid scarred brown hillsides. But the downtown is well-kept and quiet, with few visible signs that it has been at the heart of a series of drug plagues.

Residents, however, say people addicted to meth are altering the town in ways both obvious and imperceptible.

Chris Wilson, a local pastor, said a close childhood friend had recently appeared at his church. The man had lost nearly half of his body weight since they had last seen each other. When his friend asked for a ride to the next county over, Mr. Wilson agreed, even though he suspected the man was looking for meth.

“I said, ‘David, I can get you help.’ He said, ‘You don’t understand. There is no help,’” Mr. Wilson said.

Mr. Slone, the town’s mayor, said that although some residents of Louisa have acted with anger to the meth addicts in their midst, others have focused on trying to feed and clothe them and get them treatment.

But even charity comes with risks in the new environment. Rachel Wheeler, who operates a local food bank ministry, said volunteers now have to be far more cautious when making home deliveries, in case there’s a meth user in the house. Police officers have started escorting volunteers on some deliveries, or making the deliveries themselves.

Kimber Skaggs, who operates Kimber’s Country Market in nearby Blaine, Ky., said she had become adept at discerning the difference between customers who were high on pain pills and those on meth. Opioid users are often quiet and move and speak slowly, she said, while those on meth are often jumpy, scratch at their sores and behave erratically.

Daniel Castle, the town’s constable — an elected local law enforcement position in Kentucky — said his job has become progressively more dangerous as the new form of meth took hold and opioid use waned.

“You’ve got an energized addict versus a lethargic addict,” Mr. Castle said. “I’ve had multiple foot chases in the past year, and it’s all related to meth. I’ve never had someone on opiates run from me.”

Mr. Castle said he does not know a single family in Louisa untouched by opiate or meth addiction.

“I know individuals, friends of mine, who are losing touch with reality,” he said. “And I fear we haven’t reached a tipping point. It’s going to get worse before it gets better, because we have not stopped the flow of meth coming in.”

*From the article here :
 

Mr. Krinkle

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“You’ve got an energized addict versus a lethargic addict,” Mr. Castle said. “I’ve had multiple foot chases in the past year, and it’s all related to meth. I’ve never had someone on opiates run from me.”




i bet!

it doesn't take a genius to figure out why 🤓
 

Snafu of the Forest

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“You’ve got an energized addict versus a lethargic addict,” Mr. Castle said. “I’ve had multiple foot chases in the past year, and it’s all related to meth. I’ve never had someone on opiates run from me.”




i bet!

it doesn't take a genius to figure out why 🤓
yup, at every rehab or institution I went to it was always the tweakers who would break out, steal a bike and somehow think they could make it home 1000 miles away. I applaud their enthusiasm.
 

9th Euclidean Sphere

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Stuff like this only attributed to the devil ideology of any drug, meth is a monster, but it’s a monster you can control, or it’s a monster you could never control.
Some people say this as an usable anecdote:
*Narrative: Janet has worked at ABC for 50 years, their single oldest and most trusted, most kind worker. They have a new higher, a boy about 30, & Janet takes him under her wing fast forward 10 years ~

Janet: I’m retiring, and I wish for Max to take my place, in all my 60 years of being here I’ve never met, or had the blessing to train someone as dedicated, smart, and thoughtful as Max. I understand comparatively he may not have the most experience, but everything else is already within his grasp, and he can do it.”

*Narrative: They hire Max, 2 years in an a random drug fails of his, and he admits to doing meth for the last 15 years of his life.*

Janet: “I can’t believe I had been so wrong about that druggie, how I let him trick me into thinking he was a good person, or trustable human being, am I starting to lose my grasp on people’s true nature?”


What about Max’s drug use determines him a bad Human, or lower than human trust capacity? He controlled his use, maintained a job, and otherwise didn’t let it intrude on his outside life. There’s people who take one hit, and lose their entire world, and people who have done it for decades without losing anything but some money.
TL/DR, you can do the drug, or let the drug do you, that’s entirely your decision.
 

mr peabody

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Meth-induced psychosis: As meth use increases, so does risk*

by Susan Samples | Jan 3 2020

Those who struggle with substance use disorders in West Michigan are increasingly turning to crystal meth.

But this isn’t the one-pot meth made in rural basements a decade ago.

This meth is much more potent, and it comes from traffickers in Mexico.

As its use in West Michigan grows, so does the risk of meth-induced psychosis and the violence it sometimes generates.

In one recent potentially meth-related case, a man died after a scuffle with his girlfriend in a Kalamazoo County home.

The sheriff’s department declined to confirm if meth played a role, but the girlfriend’s sister was certain the drug was a factor.

“She can’t handle it. She just can’t handle the drug,” said the sister of the girlfriend, referring to her sister’s use of methamphetamine. “She hallucinates — thinks she’s seeing something, and she’s not.”

On Sunday afternoon, deputies were called to the home in the 5500 block of Electra Street in Comstock Township – a neighborhood in which meth has carved a foothold.

They found Lyle Hess, 38, dead from an undetermined cause.

Deputies initially arrested and booked Hess’s girlfriend on suspicion of murder. But prosecutors never officially charged her, and she was released from jail.

Investigators are awaiting the results of Hess’s autopsy, including toxicology testing, to determine his exact cause of death after which they’ll submit the case to the prosecutor for potential criminal charges.

The sister of the girlfriend said, if her sister caused Hess’s death, it was accidental and likely the result of mental health issues exacerbated by her use of methamphetamine.

“When she’s on meth, she’s 20 times worse than her normal self. She thinks everybody’s out to get her,” said the girlfriend's sister.

---

Michael Wolff, a clinical neuropsychologist at BRAINS Counseling in Grand Rapids, said his industry has long recognized that stimulants like meth and cocaine can cause psychosis.

“Using a chemical like methamphetamine that releases dopamine into their system in unusually strong doses gives them symptoms of schizophrenia,” said Wolff. “Paranoia comes into play — visual and auditory hallucinations, irritability, anger, confusion, sleep difficulties...”

Chronic, heavy use of meth is more likely to result in psychosis, though one dose can trigger it.

Wolff said meth can cause even a mild-mannered, non-aggressive person to become violent. He has witnessed it firsthand.

“I, unfortunately, have a very close family member who was addicted to meth and spent years in and out of prison… and has actually gone through that paranoia, and the threatening and aggressive behavior,” recalled Wolff.

"Meth users with psychotic symptoms will often lash out in their own defense because they wrongly believe people are out to hurt them."---

William Paul Jones, the suspect in a deadly home invasion in early December, allegedly thought people were following him when he burst through the back door of a stranger’s home in Kalamazoo County.



Chris Neal and family

Chris Neal, the young dad and Navy veteran who lived at the home with his wife and young daughter, told dispatchers that Jones told them to lock the door and call 911.

Neal heroically told his wife and daughter – who survived the ordeal – to hide upstairs.

When police arrived, they found Jones holding Neal hostage behind a closed door in a first-floor bedroom.

Police reported that Jones, who at one point said he did not believe the officers were truly police, began shooting through the door and wall without warning.

The gunshots struck three officers.

They survived, but Jones shot and killed Chris Neal.

*From the article here :
 

mr peabody

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"It was all while on meth"*

by Nate Gartrell | The Mercury News | 27 Sep 2019

Before accepting a sentence of 25 years to life in prison, Richmond murder defendant Seth Sears offered a detailed courtroom confession, admitting to shooting his friend, Neil Akin, in a crime Sears attributed to his own use of methamphetamine.

“I really don’t understand why I made the decision to kill him, I really don’t,” Sears said.

Sears, 39, shot Akin, 24, in September 2015, inside Sears’ Richmond apartment, where Akin was staying. Sears originally pleaded not guilty and fought the charges for years. But then he shocked everyone, including his attorney, by deciding to plead guilty and accept a life sentence just days into his August trial.

In his sentencing hearing Friday morning, Sears addressed the court, apologized to Akin’s family, and said he wanted to explain exactly what led to the crime. He said he and Akin were friends, and that Akin and a woman — a prosecution witness named Summer — had helped Sears get off heroin “by substituting methamphetamine.”

Sears said that by 2015, he became a heavy meth user and, “was in full-blown speed psychosis.”

“I thought people were following me, I thought people were recording my home with audio and video, and I thought people were recording me through my cellphone,” Sears said.

The day of the homicide Sears was up around 2:30 a.m., when he said he wanted to fix himself a meal. He said he believed Akin was blocking the door to the refrigerator, and that Akin pushed him out of the way, and smirked at him when he tried to open the door. Sears was offended by the smirk, he said.

“I got mad. I told him he had an hour to apologize,” Sears said. “He never apologized, and I shot him.”

After the homicide, Sears said he came to the horrible realization that he had hallucinated the whole thing, except for the part where he shot Akin.

“I don’t think he really smirked. It was just a hallucination, and I shot him in his sleep,” Sears said. He later added, “Akin didn’t deserve what I did to him. He was nothing but a good friend to me.”

Before Sears’ remarks, he listened to tearful statements from Akin’s parents and brother, as well as a song called “Dancing in the Sky,” which Akin’s mother played to honor her son’s memory.

“I believe 25-to-life nowhere near touches the tip for you. I believe you’re a monster and you should be locked away for the rest of your natural-born life,” said George Akin, Neil Akin’s father. “I hope every night, my son visits you in your sleep. … The main thing I wish, Seth, is that I live another 25 years to see you walk out of the prison.”

After the crime, Sears said he called Summer to help him get rid of Neil Akin’s body. He said he wrapped the body in plastic, kept it in his home for days and then eventually dumped it in Oakland with the help of a man he refused to name.

“I tried to get away with this. … It was all while on meth,” Sears said.

Sears said at the time of the murder he thought “guns were cool” but has since changed his mind. He also said he has been sober since May 2016.

“After taking the life of someone with a gun, I really don’t think guns should be in our society,” Sears said during cross-examination. “It’s way too easy. It’s like pushing a button.”

Sears ended his statement with a message to Akin’s family.

“I just want to offer my deepest apologies to the family. … There’s no way I can ever make up for what I’ve done,” he said. “It’s just a tragedy, and I’m really sorry.”

“Thank you,”
replied Akin’s mother from the courtroom gallery.

*From the article here :
 

mr peabody

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This is what meth-induced psychosis feels like

by Elizabeth Brico | VICE

I knew it was time to go to sleep when I started to see the insanity fleas. That's what I called the little black dots that jumped across my arms and burrowed into my flesh, tickling the underside of my skin. They usually started to appear after staying awake for three nights, which I was doing because I was spun out on meth. I was 16, and taking way too much of it with an addicted boyfriend.

"Meth psychosis is a severe reaction estimated to occur in about 40 percent of users—which far surpasses rates of substance-induced psychosis associated with other commonly misused drugs. It's caused by the overproduction of dopamine in the brain that is induced by meth," says Larissa Mooney, director of the UCLA Addiction Medicine Clinic. "In combination with other factors, like lack of sleep or a genetic predisposition to mental illness, this neurochemical surge can trigger a complete break from reality."

I experienced meth psychosis numerous times, and each break was different after the insanity fleas showed up. The first time, I hallucinated miniature people, about the size of my thumb, dancing and playing on the furniture in the house where I was getting high. The worst time, I believed that I had written the world into existence, and had to wage an epic war against evil shape-shifting wizards who morphed out of strangers everywhere I went. On other occasions I thought I was an alien, or had the ability to translate secret messages from dog barks, or had foreknowledge of an imminent nuclear attack on Seattle, where I lived. Each time was short—once I got some sleep, the psychosis waned. But those handful of hours were terrifying.

I managed to kick meth for good when I was 17. That was 2005, when the drug was being recognized nationally and internationally as a major problem. After that, the United States began tightening regulations around pseudoephedrine, an ingredient found in cold medicine that was being used to home-manufacture meth across the country. This led to a decline in meth use for several years. And in those years, rates of opioid addiction and opioid-related complications surged. The result? A hyper focus on what is now being termed the "opioid crisis," to the exclusion of other commonly misused drugs. But it appears that meth use is back on the rise, and with it a host of health and social problems that are going to become really hard to ignore if this upward trend continues.

This resurgence may be compounded, in part, by the fact that polydrug use is common among people with substance use disorders in general. "It's common for people to use substances together," Mooney says. "For example, someone might take a stimulant like meth, and a central nervous system depressant such as heroin to help alleviate the symptoms of the other substance. It's almost like using drugs for the opposite effect—if you're agitated you might take something more sedating to calm the anxiety."

But the rise in meth use is not just a side-effect of the opioid crisis. Manufacturers have found new ways to create meth and get it into the hands of drug users, including using phenylacetone (P2P) instead of pseudoephedrine to cook bulk batches, kind of like fictional school-teacher-turned-kingpin Walter White on Breaking Bad. Because meth doesn't share the same prescription distribution as opioids—pharmaceutical meth (Desoxyn) is only prescribed in cases of severe narcolepsy, ADD, and morbid obesity—its usage rate will likely never rival that of opioids. But SAMSHA found that in 2014 there were 569,000 people over the age of 12 using meth within the month prior to the survey. That's almost double the low point of meth use, which was 314,000 in 2008, and statistically similar to the "meth crisis" of the early 2000s. It also surpassed heroin use in the same year.

Meth misuse comes with health complications worse than hallucinations. For example, states and counties across the country are reporting an increase in meth-related deaths. In 2016, meth accounted for 7,663 overdose deaths in the United States, a significant jump from 4,900 the year before.

Mooney, who has published a number of studies focused on meth, says it "has the potential to affect all major organs, but especially the brain." She warns of potential long-term neurotoxicity, seizures, worsening of depression or anxiety, paranoia, violent behavior and, like I experienced, psychosis. It also accounts for more drug-related convictions than any other illegal drug, which means its impact hits hard at both the health and societal levels.

Paranoia or transient psychoses are among the most common serious side-effects of meth use. In fact, paranoia and psychotic behaviors are so strongly linked with meth in our social consciousness they've essentially become a joke. I've certainly told the story of babbling to a stranger about my liaisons with his other body as a dark-comedy bit. But what about those people who have a genetic vulnerability that predisposes them to long-term psychosis? People like my husband, Ricardo.

Last November, my husband took a hit of meth as a study aid. He has a maternal family history of schizoid personality disorders, and a previous history of marijuana-induced psychosis. He's absolutely the last person who should have ever taken meth, but he did—and he paid the price. Since late November 2017 until early May 2018, he's been in and out of psych wards in both Washington State and Florida, unable to differentiate his perceptions from reality.

"I thought I saw people lingering outside of the apartment and I heard people talking about me," he tells me, describing his version of the events that I witnessed firsthand. I remember him waking me throughout the night for weeks on end, convinced someone was outside the window with a gun aimed at him. I remember him begging me to call the police on the man only he could hear, who he insisted was screaming non-stop homicidal threats. I remember him hiding knives around our apartment, readying for a fight that would never come. I remember him giving up; standing in front of the window for hours, waiting for that bullet to tear through his chest.

My husband chose to take meth, but I know he never expected to spend six months in fear for his life. The next person who experiences that probably won't expect it either. Nor do the more than 7,000 people expect to die from a drug we aren't focusing on enough. We can't stop fighting on the opioid front, but we need to start recognizing that there are other factors when it comes to substance misuse in this country—and methamphetamine could be gearing up to be a major player once again.

 

mr peabody

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How meth almost made me a killer*

@Vexanize

Don't even try to argue with me about this shit, as meth literally almost made me into a monster.

Now, I've done meth a few times and was fine, but when I used it only TWICE in a week, I went completely psychotic for days and I'm finally coming back to reality.

It all started when I got some exo's that were "MDMA and MDA" but turned out to be cut with meth. I took five double stacked, as I thought I could handle a high dose of psychedelics. Cut to the most terrifying moment in my life. I'm going to copy and paste what I wrote a few hours after it happened...

"So I've had strange experiences before where I hear a strange deep croaking sound or my friends would feel something chasing them if they were in the woods. But, I think it's finally starting to attack and it's scaring the hell out of me, every single way it moved and basically shapeshifted just screams skin walker to me.

Basically, I went outside to smoke some weed as normal. I was on the 2nd story of my house on the deck, which usually makes me feel pretty safe. But, as I went on to the 3rd bowl I heard a light rustling of leaves, like a racoon that quickly morphed into an aggressive and erratic behavior. The rustling got louder like it grew in size to that of a human. But, even though it was humanoid and even made a small groan that sounded like it was hungry, the way the sound of it moving could dart across my left to right ear, almost like it's moving faster than a cheetah but almost more articulate and precise with it's movements.

I then started telling myself that I'm on the second floor so it can't hurt me. But then what I've feared would happen, happened. It quickly darted over to me from what I'm guessing was like 30 yards in a few seconds. It then quickly scurried up the pillars of my deck (idk if skin walkers can climb) and then pounced onto the wood with a disturbingly loud thud. I accepted death at this moment as I was helpless and realized - this thing is so much stronger than me. But, for some reason it jumped off almost hesitant to kill me. It scurried around and then hurdled my fence with no effort or grunts. It then darted around my entire backyard within seconds.

I'm really fucking scared and I don't know what to do. I want to go out tonight and look for it so I can video tape that bitch. "If I die, then the video will be on my phone, and there will finally be proof of this evil." When nightfall came the next day (I hadn't slept) it felt like it was a Wendigo spirit trying to possess me, making me hear whispers and screams. It felt like something was digging into my head and amplifying my emotions. I then got some sleep and the next day it felt like it was gone. When night struck I could feel this being again. This time it was giving me intrusive thoughts of killing my family and imagining the taste and texture of human flesh. It went away again, so I fell asleep.

The next night I went upstairs to cook, but there is a glass door leading to my deck where the encounter happened. I swear to God I saw its hand outside, it had sharp claws and a pale skin tone. I was terrified as I could feel the pure dread and fear going through my body. I then looked up what Wendigo is, and found that "Wendigo psychosis" is a real condition that meth was basically simulating. As this psychosis wears off, I feel uneasy and angry at almost everything. I'm just so glad this is over."


I want this information to be out in the public as a warning to anyone planning to abuse this drug.

*Reprinted with permission from the author, @Vexanize

 

mr peabody

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Meth users become violent, paranoid, psychotic*

by Cornelius Frolik | Dayton Daily | 9 Sep 2019

Before going on a deadly crime spree, Raymond Walters displayed paranoid, delusional and erratic behaviors, according to police, his family and neighbors.

Walters, 32, is accused of causing the deadly car crash in downtown Dayton that killed two children. Prior to the events, neighbors and people who know him say he said he saw demons, looked for his dead mother, walked around with a machete, believed people were after him and told neighbors and family they had “the devil inside.”

Psychotic episodes and irrational behaviors are common among meth users, which is why law enforcement and mental health and substance abuse experts are deeply concerned about growing evidence of the drug’s comeback.

More meth in the community means more people are at risk of becoming aggressive, delusional, violent or experiencing “meth psychosis,” the symptoms of which resemble paranoid schizophrenia.

“A person using high amounts of meth can be dangerous,” said Jodi Long, associate director of Montgomery County Alcohol, Drug Addiction & Mental Health Services (ADAMHS).

Meth users who are addicted or who go on long binges tend to commit more serious and violent crimes than people addicted to other types of drugs,” law enforcement officials said.

“With heroin, we’re mainly worried about people dying,” said Montgomery County Sheriff Rob Streck. “With meth, you worry about car pursuits, robberies, stabbings — things like that.”

Opioids have dominated headlines and the community’s attention in recent years but local law enforcement and substance abuse professionals are worried meth is seeing a resurgence. An increase could be occurring partly because demand for heroin has leveled off.

Drug use is cyclical, and opioid addicts and users who receive medication-assisted treatment cannot get high on opioids, said Long, with ADAMHS.

"But they can still get high on meth, because it affects different receptors in the brain," she said.

"Meth is highly powerful stimulant that gives users lots of energy, a false sense of confidence and can cause hyperactivity and nervousness, which can turn into paranoia, hallucinations and thinking people are after them," Long said.

"Meth impairs thought processes, judgment, motor skills and users have a high risk of aggression, making them more likely to commit acts of violence they wouldn’t do when sober or high on some other substances," Long said.

"Meth users are almost drawn to 'shiny objects,' so they might walk out into traffic or drop in somewhere uninvited," Long said, "and they tend to be nervous and agitated and can get defensive when interacting with other people."

Long says more people are reporting using meth and anecdotally she’s heard emergency rooms are seeing patients admitted with meth psychosis.

Meth appeared as a factor in the cause of death of 50 people in Montgomery County in 2017 — more than triple the 2016 number.

On Aug. 26, police arrested Walters after he allegedly stabbed his father more than a dozen times, stole and crashed his truck, stole a Riverside police SUV, rammed another police vehicle, and then drove 101 mph before crashing into two vehicles in downtown Dayton, killing two young children.

Multiple neighbors said they believe Walters had been using methamphetamine since being released from state prison on Aug. 10 and seemed to lose his grip on reality. Dayton police Chief Richard Biehl said meth may have been a contributing factor in Walters’ crime spree, given his behavior at the crime scenes.

Neighbors said Walters was hallucinating, saw demons, believed people were secretly recording his comments and was convinced a drug cartel was coming after him.

“He got on meth real bad and started acting crazy,” said neighbor Jason Butts, 47, who is friends with Lloyd Walters, the suspect’s father. “Man, when he’s not on that stuff, he’s the nicest guy you’ll ever meet, but when he shoots that meth, it’s like Dr. Jekyll.”

Butts said Walters accused him of having the devil inside. Walters also talked about killing a couple of unnamed people, and threatened his father, according to Butts and other neighbors. In 2011, he was accused of fighting with his father, Lloyd Walters, and knocking out a few of his teeth.

Last December, Walters was arrested after allegedly attacking his girlfriend, who had extensive injuries, including a black eye swollen shut, bite marks on her elbow and blood streaming from her nose and mouth.

"Dealers and drug cartels are mixing fentanyl in with meth and other drugs to make them more powerful and addictive, and meth already is much stronger than when people used to make it in mobile labs, basements and garages," Streck said.

"With opioids, people tend to fall into a stupor," Streck said, "but with meth, it’s just the opposite. People are up for days on end. They're on edge. They're nervous, antsy. They often pick at their skin."

"Meth users have been responsible for robberies, police pursuits, assaults and are far more of a 'fight risk' when they are arrested and come into the Montgomery County Jail,"
Streck said. "Meth users incarcerated at the jail can be in a state of psychosis for 24 to 48 hours, during which time they can be combative," he added.

In one case, a mother in Greene County was obsessed with the thought of receiving subliminal messaging through her phone and social media accounts and experienced hallucinations.

In another case, in August 2018, Dayton police were called to a home in the Belmont neighborhood where a 51-year-old man convinced the next door neighbor was conspiring against him, and claimed he'd been "shot by police earlier in the day, but 'was not hurt because he’s invincible,' " a police report stated.

*From the article here :
 

tweakerguy

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Dr. Jonathan Brett and clinical Dr. Elizabeth Knock at St Vincent’s Hospital are running a clinical trial
to investigate the effects of psilocybin in therapy for meth addiction.

Psilocybin for meth users: Sydney trial aims to conquer addiction*

by Kate Aubusson | Sydney Morning Herald | 22 Mar 2021

A world-first clinical trial in Sydney aims to find out if giving psychedelics to people who use methamphetamines can help conquer their addiction.

Researchers at St Vincent’s Hospital in Darlinghurst will use psilocybin – the active ingredient in magic mushrooms – to turbocharge therapy for patients dependent on “meth” or “ice.”

Head researcher Dr Jonathan Brett, staff specialist in clinical pharmacology, toxicology and addiction medicine at St Vincent’s is acutely aware of the pressures to conduct such a trial within the most rigorous ethical and scientific boundaries.

“You can’t just give it a crack and see how it goes,” Dr Brett said.

“We wouldn’t at all be encouraging people to try this at home … it needs an established treatment protocol behind it.”

All participants will have at least three counselling sessions with specialised therapists before they get anywhere near psilocybin.

They’ll build a therapeutic relationship, understand their addictive patterns and have a clear understanding of what they hope to get out of treatment.

Participants then take their 25mg capsule of pharmaceutical grade psychedelic under supervision, followed by three or more therapy sessions.

“It’s good bang for your buck,” co-researcher, clinical psychologist Dr Elizabeth Knock said, referring to the treatment’s two-to-three-month time frame.

“That is a short period of psychosocial treatment, which is what excites me about this research – the potential to speed up, enhance or maximise on the conversations that we have as counsellors with these patients.”

The dosage used seems to be the optimal amount to avoid unwanted side effects – such as hallucinations – but still trigger a psychedelic effect, she said.

“It is really about people feeling freer to tell stories in their heads without being tied down to their value,” Dr Knock said.

“It’s this internal psychological and spiritual experience that people describe as transformative … they describe being transported back to childhood or back to where they can have conversations with people and resolve situations.”

One way to think about it, Dr Brett said, is to imagine the mind as a landscape of rolling hills, valleys and troughs.

“The troughs represent deeply held values and you can really get stuck in those troughs which is where the addiction sustains itself. Psilocybin allows the valleys to be flattened and people to shift their values more freely,” he said.

The trial will recruit 15 participants in August from among patients over 25-years-old who are already seeking treatment for meth addiction at St Vincent’s.

“These will be people who may have tried to achieve their goals but have not had success,” Dr Brett said.

The eligibility screening process will be strict. Patients can’t be taking any medication that may interact with the psychedelic, and will need to see a nurse, an addiction specialist and their psychiatrist before they are accepted.

Anyone with a history of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder or a family history of either will be excluded.

“We won’t start with heavy users,” Dr Brett said. “They’ll be people who use over a long weekend or Fridays to Mondays. That is the safest place to start this research. If it’s safe and feasible in that population then we can expand it.”

The trial – funded by the National Centre for Clinical Research on Emerging Drugs – will use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure brain activity before and after the psilocybin-augmented therapy.

The trial will focus on the default mode network – regions of the brain that activate when we’re awake but not focused on any particular task of mental exercise.

The network is responsible for introspection and mental time travel to experiences, and central to defining who we are, Dr Brett said, and previous research suggest psilocybin stabilises this network.

“We are looking for evidence of causation: that this treatment is effective for this reason,” he said.

The history of psychedelic research has been dogged by controversy since entering the mainstream in the 1930s.

“There were some very well-intentioned researchers, but they weren’t necessarily up to today’s standards,” Dr Brett said.

Then the political war on drugs in the 1970s stoked fear of the drugs among the public, and overzealous psychedelic researchers performed experiments that compromised the integrity of the field, he said.

The researchers stressed they are not suggesting psilocybin is a standalone treatment.

“We must tread very carefully and follow the ethical and scientific processes,” Dr Brett said.

Last Wednesday, the federal government launched $15 million in grants for clinical trials to investigate whether psychedelic drugs could be potential breakthrough therapies for mental illnesses.

The announcement followed an interim decision by the Therapeutic Goods Administration in February that rejected a push to allow psychiatrists to prescribe MDMA and psilocybin led by not-for-profit organisation Mind Medicine Australia.

President of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Associate Professor John Allan welcomed the funding and the TGA’s decision.

“Research into medicines containing psychedelic substances should only occur under research trial conditions that include oversight by an institutional research ethics committee and careful monitoring and reporting of effectiveness and safety outcomes,” Associate Professor Allan said.

“Trials like these will hopefully improve our knowledge, providing the evidence-based research to comprehensively assess the efficacy, safety and effectiveness of psychedelic therapies to inform future potential use in psychiatric practice.”

*From the article here :
Please come to America next 😞
 

mr peabody

Moderator: Music Discussion, PM
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"I think your in a position... where you're gonna have to decide whether you're hanging on the cross,
or banging in the nails."


Meth users at risk of congestive heart failure

by Paul Krueger

Studies show emergency room visits related to methamphetamine abuse have increased over recent years.

As methamphetamine arrests continue to climb and the amount of the illicit drugs seized by law enforcement steadily increases, hospitals are treating more health problems caused by the street drug.

Meth-related heart failure is one of the most serious illnesses diagnosed in San Diego County emergency rooms and doctor’s offices.

"The fatality rate with meth-associated congestive heart failure is extraordinarily high," said Dr. David Shaw, a cardiologist at Scripps Mercy Hospital in Hillcrest.

Shaw said methamphetamine damages the heart muscle and causes the heart to enlarge. It can no longer efficiently pump blood to the lungs and other organs, causing fluids to back up in your body. A patient’s legs can swell, exhausted by just standing up.

Shaw said the effect of congestive heart failure is similar to a malfunctioning mechanical pump like you’d buy at Home Depot.

"You have a pump in the basement,” Shaw explained. “If it doesn't work, the basement fills up with water. That's pretty much what happens to the body."

Doctor Shaw and colleagues reviewed 3,000 cases of congestive heart failure at two Scripps hospitals and published their findings in a medical journal.

They found that meth-related heart failures almost tripled from 2009 to 2014.

By comparison, Shaw’s study found there was almost no increase in heart failure caused by alcohol or cocaine use.

"Fortunately," Shaw says, "a meth-damaged heart can be at least partially repaired when addicts stop using the illicit drug and take prescription medications the help rebuild the damaged muscle."

“They start with a heart that’s enlarged, and they end up with a heart that’s contracting much more vigorously,”
Shaw told NBC 7 Investigates.

Scripps and other local hospitals work closely with addiction counselors and the county’s Methamphetamine Strike Force to help users wean themselves from the illicit drug.

“We've gotten a lot of patients that abstain permanently, or at least very long term, with support from families,” Shaw said. “Family support is critical. Family and friend support in abstaining."

Methamphetamine-related hospitalizations are also on the rise.

A study published last year in the Journal of the American Medical Association found 206,000 such hospitalizations in 2015, compared to 55,500 in 2008.

The western states, including California, have experienced more meth-related hospitalizations than other areas.

According to that study, the cost of meth-related hospital care was more than $2 billion in 2015.

 

BenzoBrain^^

Bluelighter
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May 25, 2021
Messages
361
Isn't cocaine more likely to cause sudden cardiac events? (haven't read entire thread yet)
 

JackARoe

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Jan 16, 2009
Messages
1,483
Was a funeral last Monday for my friends 31 year old son. He had a stroke and ended up brain dead and they had to pull the plug. Just a little bit of cocaine and meth in his system. Seems it could happen to even youngsters. That type of stuff would take any fun or feel good out of using these things. I did use my fair share of cocaine in the late 70's and early 80's. Never really did meth.

Take care of your health peeps.
 

mr peabody

Moderator: Music Discussion, PM
Staff member
Joined
Aug 31, 2016
Messages
5,337
Location
Frostbite Falls, MN
Was a funeral last Monday for my friends 31 year old son. He had a stroke and ended up brain dead and they had to pull the plug. Just a little bit of cocaine and meth in his system. Seems it could happen to even youngsters. That type of stuff would take any fun or feel good out of using these things. I did use my fair share of cocaine in the late 70's and early 80's. Never really did meth.

Take care of your health peeps.
I am so sorry for your loss. My beautiful son passed in 2016.
 

JackARoe

Bluelighter
Joined
Jan 16, 2009
Messages
1,483
^ I have a lot of respect for you that went through that and continue in life. We'll make it there too Mr Peabody. The train will pull into the station (like in all the bluegrass songs :) ) and the journey will arrive at a homecoming. Right now it is just scenery through a box car. Oh and the love for our loved one is always there which means they are there.

My brother was killed by a drunk driver 32 years ago. My mother said the worst thing is losing a child. I am sorry too.
 
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