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Opioids Health benefit from Opiates/Opioids

Mr.Deeds

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I will try to find as study or two as well, I have a few topics that need investigation right now so that is how my lunch break will be spent.
 

Echotango

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I have to disagee with your first sentence Echo. The major health benefit of opioid use are pain free or less painful feeling that allows chronic pain sufferers the ability to function in society instead of not being able to leave bed from how much they hurt. EVERY medication has a benefit, but most of us on here hope to find a certain benefit in their drug of choice that simply isn't there.
Wait what did you read my entire Post or just one sentence... I just said that the only benefits seem to be just psychological/Mental which falls into the category of Treating Pain since pain is part of your brain telling you have an injury essentially in lack of a better way of explaining it but sorry for any confusion about my post I AGREE with every Sentence you have stated and apologize for any misunderstanding of my Post. I'm suffering from extremely bad back pain that is only going to get worse as I age my Doctor said to Me. I'm using drugs like GABAPentin and Soma and Baclofen with a shit ton of weed to maintain my pain management for long as possible since like you said about being in so much pain that it makes it so you can't even crawl out of bed without crying from the pain and want to pop pain pills so bad but I'm trying to wait until I got no choice since Opioid Management if I get on it again I will be going on it for the rest of my Life which I'm trying to avoid as long as possible.
 

Quere

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and the fact that it slows your metabolism so you dont get old as fast as common people.
While I have to agree NZN, it does seem to reduce the appearance of aging, I would love to find some data on it. I will be at work today but if you find any info please share it. It could just be coincidence, correlation doesn't equal causation =/
I've seen some seriously haggard looking junkies though and been surprised to find they're much younger than they look. But I guess that could be due to bad diet/other lifestyle issues
 

terracotta

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I admit it isn't scientific evidence or a physical health benefit, but when I do codeine it improves my mental health a lot. I have severe depression/anxiety, and I don't do it often, once every few months or so, but every time the experience really clears my head, reduces stress, makes me less anxious, etc. for a good while afterwards. No idea if there are any studies on this but it really does seem to be therapeutic even after it's fully left my system.
 

Jabberwocky

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Yeah, being in withdrawal every time you run out. Isn't that a benefit? Who doesn't like to almost shit themselves to clean themselves after with the bucket of sweat pouring down.

I will remain forever young from them tho and I can fuck for hours which is not benefit because guess what? i like to cum.
 

Nicomorphinist

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It maintains ur youth ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥
Theres tons of. ppl who have surpassed the 100YEARS MARK using opiates errrday. I think poppyseed tea woyld be the best for this purpose or good old Morphine.
I want @Nicomorphinist opinion on this matter. ?
I certainly agree and have seen plenty of examples -- I think it has slowed down the ageing process in my case, certainly with my grandfather who was on morphine from age 38 to death of old age at 104; morphine and hydromorphone as well as nicomorphine appear to agree quite well with a number of other family members as well. I think it is the slowing of metabolism and possibly some additional protective neurological and/or endocrine effect

I also knew people in the States who started on narcotics before the Harrison Narcotics Act 1914 including one lady who was started on smack when it was used as a painkiller there in 1908, was switched to M in 1912 and expired of old age late in 2009 -- two months short of 102 years on narcotics . . . And people on narcotics from before the 1931 Suchtgiftverordnung in Austria, 1929 Opiumgesetz in Germany are still walking around in fine fettle . . . .

At least one of the founders of Johns Hopkins was on morphine for 60+ years, and Benjamin Franklin was on laudanum for much of his life.
 
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Nicomorphinist

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I admit it isn't scientific evidence or a physical health benefit, but when I do codeine it improves my mental health a lot. I have severe depression/anxiety, and I don't do it often, once every few months or so, but every time the experience really clears my head, reduces stress, makes me less anxious, etc. for a good while afterwards. No idea if there are any studies on this but it really does seem to be therapeutic even after it's fully left my system.
It was officially used by doctors for this reason well into living memory and some researchers are seeing the wisdom once again, with even oxymorphone being researched for use against intractable depression and bipolar states
 

Zonxx

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It seems that opioid use has the ability to interact with the immune system in a variety of ways. There is data showing that chronic use (this study defines chronic use as 24 months) can suppress the immune system. This may play a factor in why you dont "get sick". In reality you are probably still catching the colds but your body is not responding to the virus and thus the nasty inflammatory response that makes a person feel so shitty is not presenting. But this ultimately is a negative effect of chronic use because you are allowing your body to become more susceptible to disease.

Opioid System Modulates the Immune Function: A Review
extremely interesting, now that i've thought about it, I haven't been sick in the years that i've been on high-dose opiates, i think i last even had a cold about 3-4 years ago
 

Hylight

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I NEVER EVEN SNEEZED ON AN OPIOID LIFE

never even got a cold itvwas phenomenal !
 

kinkyjohn

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extremely interesting, now that i've thought about it, I haven't been sick in the years that i've been on high-dose opiates, i think i last even had a cold about 3-4 years ago
Now you mention it same here .. and I have to use chronic athsma drugs which as they're strong steroids mean I am imunocompromised (or however you spell that word for the day). These days I only have to use them as my allergic athsma is triggered by opiates (fine with opioids) but every other time I've had to use them god did I get sick as fuck all the time. I even played with my snotty 2 year old niece the other day .. and everybody else got sick and I didn't.

That said opiods do greatly suppress your autonomous nervous system so .. going for a shit once every three weeks and never sneezing or coughing is kinda expected.
 

GetMeOutOfThisCRAP

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They make me overall happier and able to take on any week no matter how hard. Without them everything feels so baseline and I get stressed out. Of course if you're indoors all day watching TV constantly high your mental health deteriorates fast, like any hermit lifestyle.

I wish there was a way to legalize it comletely without society going to crap. I think it would improve alot of people's lives greatly but on the other side of the spectrum we've obviously seen millions flock to heroin when opoids are no longer strong enough and or taken away by doctors. VERY few people can control their heroin use, and benefit from it because it seems heroin is a "too good to be true feeling." My best friend/roomate at one point switched to snorting H to save money, and the difference between our lives was tremendous. He totally lost himself for a while and was 24/7 a zombie and only concerned with scoring more dope. Before he made the switch, you would have never known he was on drugs. By the way, he's actually totally okay now and in the army lol.
 
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OrbitalCombustion

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Look at the 1899 Merck Manual, heroin and morphine are suggested remedies for all manner of maladies, diseases and illnesses. It does bolster your immunity but the antithesis to that is it has the power to reduce it.
 

Wilson Wilson

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It was officially used by doctors for this reason well into living memory and some researchers are seeing the wisdom once again, with even oxymorphone being researched for use against intractable depression and bipolar states
A pharma company recently tried to make a new antidepressant med that was just buprenorphine combined with a novel partial antagonist (added purely so it can be patented basically) and while it was ultimately rejected by the FDA, the given reason was that it was not deemed effective because the antagonist they invented ruined the antidepressant effects of the buprenorphine. The FDA did however vote in favour of it being adequately safe which is I think quite significant.

This then opens the door for pharma companies to potentially experiment with other opioid based medications for antidepressant use once again.

 

Nicomorphinist

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A pharma company recently tried to make a new antidepressant med that was just buprenorphine combined with a novel partial antagonist (added purely so it can be patented basically) and while it was ultimately rejected by the FDA, the given reason was that it was not deemed effective because the antagonist they invented ruined the antidepressant effects of the buprenorphine. The FDA did however vote in favour of it being adequately safe which is I think quite significant.

This then opens the door for pharma companies to potentially experiment with other opioid based medications for antidepressant use once again.

Does this come down to the politics of the μ opioid receptor? Maybe Alkermes was too clever by half and should have mixed the buprenorphine with omeprazole or cetirizine instead. If they are really counting on the κ opioid receptor to do the anti-depressant work, I cannot imagine that they are going to get very far. The difference amongst κ opioid agonism, antagonism, silent antagonism, inverse agonism, partial agonism and so forth generally are different species of dysphoria, bad body load, and hallucinations for the most part, at least that is what it sounds like . . . and so what if buprenorphine's μ opioid agonism gives it "abuse liability" -- the μ opioid receptor is manifestly the locus of the anti-depressant effect and there cannot really be half-measures involved: treatment-resistant intractable depression can more or less by definition completely incapacitate people, plus all of the other depression medications have serious side effects and withdrawal syndromes much worse than the standard opioid ones, and I never hear of suicidal ideation being a direct side effect of any opioid . . . I did wonder a bit about tapentadol and tramadol when the former was in late development, but apparently not -- the mechanism creating the suicidal ideation from many psych meds in use must be something aside from the serotonin system.

Given that dextromethorphan is showing promise in anti-depressant research, I would think that the racaemic parent opioid, dromoran, which combines DXO and levorphanol, would be the next place to look. I had it years ago in hospital after falling down the marble steps at a train station and breaking an ankle. It did the job admirably, and if they can get levorphanol out of the hands of the Pharmacy Bro and his minions, it should be rather inexpensive too.
 

GetMeOutOfThisCRAP

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Why aren't subs used for pain relief more frequently? They're somewhat harder to abuse and for someone with no tolerance they'd be pretty effective I'd think.
 

Wilson Wilson

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Does this come down to the politics of the μ opioid receptor? Maybe Alkermes was too clever by half and should have mixed the buprenorphine with omeprazole or cetirizine instead. If they are really counting on the κ opioid receptor to do the anti-depressant work, I cannot imagine that they are going to get very far. The difference amongst κ opioid agonism, antagonism, silent antagonism, inverse agonism, partial agonism and so forth generally are different species of dysphoria, bad body load, and hallucinations for the most part, at least that is what it sounds like . . . and so what if buprenorphine's μ opioid agonism gives it "abuse liability" -- the μ opioid receptor is manifestly the locus of the anti-depressant effect and there cannot really be half-measures involved: treatment-resistant intractable depression can more or less by definition completely incapacitate people, plus all of the other depression medications have serious side effects and withdrawal syndromes much worse than the standard opioid ones, and I never hear of suicidal ideation being a direct side effect of any opioid . . . I did wonder a bit about tapentadol and tramadol when the former was in late development, but apparently not -- the mechanism creating the suicidal ideation from many psych meds in use must be something aside from the serotonin system.

Given that dextromethorphan is showing promise in anti-depressant research, I would think that the racaemic parent opioid, dromoran, which combines DXO and levorphanol, would be the next place to look. I had it years ago in hospital after falling down the marble steps at a train station and breaking an ankle. It did the job admirably, and if they can get levorphanol out of the hands of the Pharmacy Bro and his minions, it should be rather inexpensive too.
From reading it seems like the antagonist they combined it with interfered with the effects at the KOR which made the bupe less effective.

Remember they can't combine bupe with an existing generic drug like cetirizine because then they cannot patent the combination preparation. In order to secure a patent they need to combine bupe with a new drug. That's the one and only reason the samidorphan is there instead of them just doing clinical trials on buprenorphine alone.

In truth it could very well be that bupe on its own could prove to be an excellent antidepressant in clinical trials, but as an old generic drug it wouldn't be profitable for a pharma company to pursue that so they don't bother.
 

slortaone

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It was officially used by doctors for this reason well into living memory and some researchers are seeing the wisdom once again, with even oxymorphone being researched for use against intractable depression and bipolar states
really? if by chance do you have a link to any info on that? only if you have the link handy, don't go out of your way...
 

Nicomorphinist

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Why aren't subs used for pain relief more frequently? They're somewhat harder to abuse and for someone with no tolerance they'd be pretty effective I'd think.
There is a buprenorphine patch which is very helpful for chronic pain for some people in some cases, and plain buprenorphine tablets are prescribed for similar cases . . . presumably it is much harder for doctors to use Suboxone off-label for pain given that there are extra regulations on it and so forth . . .

Aside from that, switching a chronic pain patient to buprenorphine from something weaker would mean having to work around the precipitated withdrawal somehow.
 
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Wilson Wilson

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My granny was given BuTrans patches for pain relief but as @Nicomorphinist said the issue was precipitated withdrawal when it turned out they didn't work well for her and she couldn't be given anything stronger than paracetamol for 24 hours while they waited around for it to exit her system. They did give her some codeine after 12 hours but as you can imagine that did sweet fuck all for someone with tolerance.
 
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