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Science [email protected]: Lets start a Bluelight Team (cure cancer while browsing Bluelight)

DigitalDuality

Bluelighter
Joined
Dec 16, 2002
Messages
21,112
Location
Jerz
What it's About:
Proteins are biology's workhorses -- its "nanomachines." Before proteins can carry out these important functions, they assemble themselves, or "fold." The process of protein folding, while critical and fundamental to virtually all of biology, in many ways remains a mystery.

Moreover, when proteins do not fold correctly (i.e. "misfold"), there can be serious consequences, including many well known diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Mad Cow (BSE), CJD, ALS, Huntington's, Parkinson's disease, and many Cancers and cancer-related syndromes.

Folding @ Home is a project that attempts to scientifically analyse this phenomena.

What can I do about it?
[email protected] is a distributed computing project -- people from through out the world download and run software to band together to make one of the largest supercomputers in the world, simulating problems thousands to millions of times more challenging than previously achieved.

In plain language, you can help by simply running a piece of software. This software will download and process a series of calculations in the background when your CPU is idle, so isn't demanding on your computer's resources. Every computer makes the project more powerful and gets the project closer to achieving it's goal.

How to get involved:
I propose this as something really positive bluelighters can do and... a friendly competition with another drug board, the shroomery... which is the 89th highest ranked contributing team to the project. Easy instructions:

  • Download the software from: http://folding.stanford.edu/English/HomePage (Windows, Mac and Linux)
    (Click here for older software versions - not recommended)
  • On installation, enter the Team Number as: 58684
  • Choose your own name (keep it similar to your Bluelight username)
  • The new installer will pretty much do the rest
Our team's information:
Bluelight team is number 58684, and was founded by 'digduality'.

Any client program can contribute to the statistics for this team by putting the number 58684 in the team field.

See the Bluelight Team Statistics Here: http://fah-web.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/main.py?qtype=teampage&teamnum=58684
 
Last edited by a moderator:

TheLoveBandit

Co-Owner
Joined
Feb 22, 2000
Messages
32,559
Location
Getting to the point ...
There is also Grid.org currently working on the Putting the Human Genome to Work project, with recent efforts on cancer studies. However, I'm too lazy to start a bluelight group for it yet :|


Either folding or grid - great ways to put your computer to work for the benefit of mankind, and I applaud any of you who are either already doing these or planning to join.

Thanks for the post, DD...er, AS 8).
 

blissfulMenace

Bluelight Crew
Joined
Mar 7, 2005
Messages
1,246
Location
Texas
ill run this on my desktop in the room which does nothing 99% of the time... sometimes it runs trillian.. ill go dl it now and get it up and running
 

TheLoveBandit

Co-Owner
Joined
Feb 22, 2000
Messages
32,559
Location
Getting to the point ...
Grid.org closing down. They point to several other good causes now that they've accomplished their goals. I suppose this means the machines I have right now running their apps will be switched over to a different one, just need to decide which.

With seven years and five projects under its belt, Grid.org has successfully completed its mission: To evangelize the benefits (and demonstrate the viability and security) of large-scale Internet-based grid computing. Therefore, it is with great pride for all the accomplishments of this pioneering resource, and above all with the utmost gratitude to each of our members around the globe, that we announce Grid.org will be retiring on Friday, April 27, 2007.

We’ll be making a public announcement on the site later this week, but we felt it was important to give you, our loyal member base, an early heads-up out of respect for the years of support you’ve given to Grid.org. This way you’ll have time to gather final statistics, exchange contact info, and prepare for the official shutdown.

What exactly is happening:
At 12:00 noon Central Time on Friday, April 27, Grid.org will retire: Jobs will stop running, forums will be closed, and the website will be updated to reflect the retired status of this resource. We will leave the actual servers up for 1 week, so agent messages about this action can continue to be sent to members around the globe who might not check forums regularly. We will also leave the Stats up for one week so you have plenty of time to gather this data. After that, only the Home and Projects pages will remain, along with the instructions for uninstalling the agent ( http://www.grid.org/help/faq_uninstalling_agent.htm ).

Why?
Grid.org has completed its established mission to prove the benefits and viability of Internet-based grid computing. Grid.org was the largest and most ambitious public interest grid venture ever attempted when it was conceived – and thanks to Grid.org (and more specifically to all of you), today such a grid is no longer a novelty. Many public grids are now available, sponsored by large organizations better positioned to provide support to millions of member volunteers and the scientists who leverage their processing power. So, with the underlying technologies now well established globally in both public and private research programs, Grid.org’s goal of establishing the underlying technology has been achieved.

But what about…
We realize that over the past few months, Grid.org has made several announcements about upgrades coming in anticipation of a couple of new projects that we were working on. While we were fairly optimistic about these projects being launched, they ultimately fell through for a number of reasons. We realize that many of you had looked forward to participating in a beta program ahead of launching these projects, and we’re sorry you won’t have that opportunity.

Moving on: Where to go from here?
It’s clear from your years of loyalty to Grid.org that Internet-based research projects of this kind are important to you… and so we’re sure many of you will take your valuable resources to other projects of this kind that are ready and willing to accept you as new members.

Below are just a few of the projects we encourage you to investigate:
> World Community Grid ( http://www.worldcommunitygrid.org/ ), operated by IBM
> Distributed.net ( http://www.distributed.net/ ), operated by distributed.net
> Compute Against Cancer ( http://www.computeagainstcancer.org/ ), operated by National Cancer Institute
> [email protected] ( http://www.stanford.edu/group/pandegroup/folding/ ), operated by Stanford University
> [email protected] ( http://fightaidsathome.scripps.edu/ ), operated by Olson Lab at Scripps Research Institute
> [email protected] ( http://athome.web.cern.ch/athome/ ), operated by CERN
> Distributed Folding ( http://www.distributedfolding.org/ ), operated by a group of partners including Hogue Bioinformatics Research Lab, Mount Sinai Hospital, and University of Toronto
> [email protected] ( http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/ ), operated by University of California at Berkeley

Also, here are a few great sites to visit to learn more about these and other projects:

> http://enterthegrid.com/
> http://gridcafe.web.cern.ch/gridcafe/gridprojects/fora.html
> http://www.ogf.org/
> http://www.grid.org.il/

Uninstalling the agent
The agent will no longer be processing work after Friday at noon, so you will want to uninstall it from your home device. Here’s how: http://www.grid.org/help/faq_uninstalling_agent.htm . Some more explicit instructions, including Troubleshooting, will be posted online Friday when Grid.org actually retires.

Last but not least
As we’ve tried to emphasize not only in this announcement but throughout our years of operations, we are fully aware of the debt of gratitude we owe to all of you, our loyal members.

The excellent work Grid.org has done, both in contributing massive research power to critical health research and in establishing this kind of research as viable, would not have been possible without your faith, efforts, and donations of compute power and goodwill. There is no superlative high enough to describe the value we place on your ongoing support for Grid.org, and so we simply say Thank you, and we hope you feel as proud as we do of the work you’ve done.

Sincerely,
The Grid.org Team
 

TheLoveBandit

Co-Owner
Joined
Feb 22, 2000
Messages
32,559
Location
Getting to the point ...
I haven't dug into many of the other options as yet (exploring both [email protected] and compute against cancer) but is anyone aware of distributed programs in this grouping that are either already working on or being rewritten to utilize multiprocessor computers? I believe I read there is one looking to use the high powered GPUs on the more recent video cards (it is an image intensive program...I just don't remember what project it was :\ ).
 

TheLoveBandit

Co-Owner
Joined
Feb 22, 2000
Messages
32,559
Location
Getting to the point ...
GenericMind said:
Probably a silly question, but does anyone know if more than one of these applications can be run at once? I'd like to run both [email protected] and Compute Against Cancer simultaneously if possible.
You can, however they will be competing for processor time, which means your returns to both efforts will be lower than what you could offer a single application. This is assuming you have a single processor PC. Dual cores or dual processors (not Hyperthreading, that's faking it) can be of use in this case, as each process can be assigned a core to work with and life will be dandy.
 

kittyinthedark

Bluelight Crew
Joined
Mar 23, 2004
Messages
10,887
I'm all signed up and such! My freshman lab research was for a professor working on a new way to build proteins - this shit is awesome!
 

chopped_chimp

Bluelighter
Joined
Sep 6, 2005
Messages
1,641
Location
Brisbane
Please excuse my ignorance, but would it slow my computer down much? It's already a pig of a thing.
 

TheLoveBandit

Co-Owner
Joined
Feb 22, 2000
Messages
32,559
Location
Getting to the point ...
^^You have an option of having this only run when you are in screensaver mode (hence, you're not using the PC and it can run as fast as it wants).


If you have it running all the time (not just screensaver) then it is supposed to throttle back and only use the CPU cycles that you aren't using. Therefore when you're busy on the PC it'll only run a little bit, and if you're just surfing the net (not using your processor much) it'll throttle up and get more done. But you will notice it's running and feel some effect. If this is a concern, stick to the screensaver mode.
 
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