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Drug Rehab Program Cult

smokeymcpot42088

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Dec 23, 2006
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yea had pathways, actually got my rehab counselour fired. woop woop. Yea it was clearly a cult first day we had problems on question #2 write in a higher power than yourself. I wrote in morphine and explained that obviously it had more power than me or I wouldn't be here. didn't find it amusing. The cops was answer #2, we went down this path till it was established many things have more power than me and god was not going to pop out of my mouth.

BTW got her shitcanned for incompetence and breaking confidentiality agreement. Incompetence, she said they quit prescribing things like valium in the 80s so I brought mine in the next week. Confidentiality, she told my shrink he shouldn't write me benzos because I was on probation and had substance issues.
 

Mafioso

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Thankfully there are a few of "standard" certifying bodies out there helping to regulate and prevent these types of things. Most rehabs and counselors have be certified by state and some are even nationally certified.

If the rehab doesn't clearly display the certifications from recognized certifying bodies, I would be very questionable of their ethics, legality and practices.

These church/religious based rehabs often mean well and can have the funding that a lot of public places can't. If they operate as any state certified rehab, there theoretically shouldn't be a problem, but if they try to operate under some religious exemption or rules then who knows what is possible. Even state certified rehabs are not perfect and are guilty of violation. At least there is over sigh there, rules, regulations, audits, etc.

Although relatively new and hard to study, places like rehabs and detox centers certified by city, county, state, and/or nation do try to base their practices on psychology and other modern sciences available. Unfortunately the intention to help isn't always enough and the guise of helping can often be used for exploitation. There is a definite need for oversight, but also buyer beware type of thing. Also, difference in philosophies within those rules should be considered,,
 

smokeymcpot42088

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they claimed to be non secular but they clearly were. The only acceptable answer was often "our lord and savior jesus Christ" and as close as you can get to that verbatim the more points.
 

MikeOekiM

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rock the casbah ¸¸.•*¨*• ☮☠
the one rehab i went to still makes me nervous just thinking about it. the entire staff felt like they had 0 training. my counselor just looked at his phone the entire time we talked, so i wanted to leave and they made me talk with them for hours with some indian dude that would come up with the dumbest reasons for staying (there are good reasons to not leave rehab but everything he was saying was childish).

I kept having to answer the same questions over and over and he wouldn't accept my answers. my mom came a day earlier than she was supposed to and he says wait she isnt supposed to be here and trying to make it so I can't leave.

everything just felt really scary and like i had no power.

will never go to any rehab again cuz of that
 

herbavore

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The saddest thing in the world to me is that re-habs are the sorry things that they are. Not all of them of course but through listening to countless people here on BL and IRL I would guess most of them. And yet everyone from families to courts to the new "experts" we are subjected to in the media talking about the opiate crisis in the U.S., thinks of them as the only path to managing addiction. I see a huge parallel with the cancer treatment industry. Rather than pour all our resources, research and $$ into prevention we wait until the disease is present and squander a lot of time and energy putting people through dangerous chemotherapies. Sure, they work a fraction of the time, if they don't kill you. The other parallel is that there is a ton of $$ to be made from cancer treatment centers as well as drug treatment centers. I'm sure the drug treatment industry is loving all this talk about more $$ for rehabs that has come out of the opiate crisis.
 

Tubbs

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When I came back home my family was heavily pushing rehab, to the point that I had to threaten to just leave and disappear to get them to reconsider. The people I've known here in St. Louis that have gone to the few rehab centers have come back with a severe disdain for them, mostly due to a lack of actual treatment.
 

herbavore

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^ I once started a thread asking people for their utopian ideas about effective rehab. It did not get a lot of responses.

Start with real nutirtion. Food is the single most mood-altering substance in our lives.

Replace autocracy of 12-step with an integration of useful content from the "steps" with other practical attempts to address the roots of addiction (SMART/RATIONAL Recovery, Refuge Recovery, etc).

Integrate all tried and true practices for reconnecting with one's authentic self. CBT, mindfulness, breath training, yoga/body awareness, traditional talk therapy. Offer a "salad bar" of resources and let people naturally gravitate to what works best for them.

Let people define their own recovery process and encourage an open mind for others whose process may not reflect their own. There is no one reason for addiction just like their is no one reason for anxiety or depression. Our experiences and our natures and our mental frameworks are unique--so recovery protocol will be unique as well.

Bring in animals in need. ( as in The Wounded Warrior projects or inmates in prisons helping re-socialize abused dogs). Animals are wonderful healers and to the ones that have been abandoned or abused by our species, well, we owe them.

Get outside into nature every day for a large part of the day. Encourage a relationship with a larger reality than the limiting one that has created pain (usually human--from families to society in general). Nature can be relaxing, challenging, invigorating, calming, sedating. Learning how to get some of your most basic emotional needs met by nature is a very powerful inner resource.

Encourage true spirituality. We are all spiritual, physical, intellectual and psychological beings and a healthy life depends on nurturing every one of those aspects of self. What is spiritual in us carries the flame of awareness that we are part of something much, much larger than we can even comprehend. What sort of explanation people choose to put on that awareness is their own prerogative. I personally have a very hard time with the world's religions but I have known wonderful people who use those very frameworks to create lives of compassion and interconnectedness. So, who am I to judge? For me, nurturing my own spirituality is nurturing my ability to live with mystery comfortably. I have no idea what happened before I got here or what happens once the body goes. I'd rather spend my short time here seeing and loving the planet and the other creatures that live here than devote my energy to answering those unanswerable questions.

I'd be happy to hear others ideas on this.
 
Last edited:

Chon

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Apr 30, 2018
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36
^ I once started a thread asking people for their utopian ideas about effective rehab. It did not get a lot of responses.

Start with real nutirtion. Food is the single most mood-altering substance in our lives.

Replace autocracy of 12-step with an integration of useful content from the "steps" with other practical attempts to address the roots of addiction (SMART/RATIONAL Recovery, Refuge Recovery, etc).

Integrate all tried and true practices for reconnecting with one's authentic self. CBT, mindfulness, breath training, yoga/body awareness, traditional talk therapy. Offer a "salad bar" of resources and let people naturally gravitate to what works best for them.

Let people define their own recovery process and encourage an open mind for others whose process may not reflect their own. There is no one reason for addiction just like their is no one reason for anxiety or depression. Our experiences and our natures and our mental frameworks are unique--so recovery protocol will be unique as well.

Bring in animals in need. ( as in The Wounded Warrior projects or inmates in prisons helping re-socialize abused dogs). Animals are wonderful healers and to the ones that have been abandoned or abused by our species, well, we owe them.

Get outside into nature every day for a large part of the day. Encourage a relationship with a larger reality than the limiting one that has created pain (usually human--from families to society in general). Nature can be relaxing, challenging, invigorating, calming, sedating. Learning how to get some of your most basic emotional needs met by nature is a very powerful inner resource.

Encourage true spirituality. We are all spiritual, physical, intellectual and psychological beings and a healthy life depends on nurturing every one of those aspects of self. What is spiritual in us carries the flame of awareness that we are part of something much, much larger than we can even comprehend. What sort of explanation people choose to put on that awareness is their own prerogative. I personally have a very hard time with the world's religions but I have known wonderful people who use those very frameworks to create lives of compassion and interconnectedness. So, who am I to judge? For me, nurturing my own spirituality is nurturing my ability to live with mystery comfortably. I have no idea what happened before I got here or what happens once the body goes. I'd rather spend my short time here seeing and loving the planet and the other creatures that live here than devote my energy to answering those unanswerable questions.

I'd be happy to hear others ideas on this.
I think a lot of the problems arise around funding. Besides insurance, I don't know of many organizations besides religious one's that frequently and consistently give money to the cause. Once insurance gets involved, then you are forced behind all the regulations and things can get complicated quickly.

Most people who need treatment can't afford it, and good treatment often doesn't come cheap.

If I could design my own ideal treatment it would probably look a lot like you mentioned. The rehab I was sent to was suppossedly used a "wholistic" approach. Nutrition was emphasized and diet was moderately restricted. But short of hiring expensive dietitians, how can you ensure that the client is getting what is needed? Diet and nutrition can be very complex, and although we as individuals can do pretty well for ourselves, it becomes different when you are charging someone for a service. And honestly, when put in comparison to other issues, it is one of lesser importance. Something like around 40% of people with eating disorders also have a substance use disorder, and 30% of people with a substance use disorder also have eating disorders. So it is more important that the client is eating relatively well on a regular consistent basis, rather than the client is getting some super polished up, chisled abs, all organic diet because any food is better than no food.

Also, coming from a therapeutic standpoint, it may complicate things if trying to deal with multiple disorders at once. Substance use disorder counselors are often not trained to treat deeper underlying issues, only the substance use disorder itself. I was sent to a dual-diagnosis facility which had a PhD on staff to deal with mental disorders. She was also the owner(and a complete cunt no less..), so I'd imagine trying to staff one would be very costly, so most "rehabs" only treat the substance use disorder.

The owner talked about a lot of those things, but being that she was outed as a control freak and a liar by everyone, including staff, most things didn't get done right. She would cancel group and have me working on her personal house. To the point where I started having to say that if she wants me to do any more electrical work I will have to start charging her. Madness that is really unbelievable and hard to describe.

So that is just to say that ideals are sometimes more difficult to achieve than anticipated. Not to say that it can't be done, but it would take a good team of well coordinated staff with similar ideals to really achieve right. There isn't exactly people lining up to work in the recovery field either. So just some real world struggles that I see, but I have hope that things can change as well. If the money was spent to rehabilitate rather than punish drug offenders, it could be done.
 

BeachBum4u

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OK herbavore, you sold me! I suggest you turn what you just wrote into a Grant Funding Proposal. You have some incredibly innovative and mindful ideas that if put into an actual living and breathing animal could really benefit a ton of people. You wouldn't have any thoughts to really make something like that happen, would you? Wow, send that to someone for crying out loud, maybe a Senator or Congressman. Seriously, you really laid out some great ideas! Good job!
 

herbavore

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@BeachBum: Well, I think the sad part is what Chon brought up in his post: funding. If we had a society that truly understood that we all benefit from making sure everyone is as healthy as they can be, this wouldn't even cost that much. But we live in a society with for-profit insurance companies, for-profit medical system (including mental health) and even the most dedicated person working within that system will have severe limitations on their ability to provide quality healthcare. But, it doesn't mean we can't try. I did send something like this to our county judges and asked them to reflect on the inadequacy of the "treatment" they require people to attend, holding those same people responsible when they relapse.

@Chon: a model I had in mind was the last elementary school I worked at. It was a small country school so there was one class per grade which meant every teacher at the school would work with each child/family at some point. Add in the school psychologist, the speech therapist, the special education support team and you had lots of different skill sets all coming together and sharing their own particular training with each other to form a personalized program for every student. I do not think addiction counselors will ever be fully trained psychologists though I do believe there could be more integration. And psychologists need addiction counseling training!But short of changing the education in these fields, surely we could do better to share information between them. The evidence is really clear at this point about the intersection of addiction and mental health challenges from depression/anxiety to the more severe diagnoses. Surely those fields themselves could find ways to expand and share knowledge.

The director of your program brings up another valid point and probably the hardest of all to address. A program, like a school, can only be as good as the people staffing it. And there you have lots of potential for both excellence and disaster, often from nothing more than changes in directors.:( When we were looking for treatment for my son we paid a private oversight company an exorbitant amount of money to monitor the programs we sent our son to. We were terrified of the abuses that could occur in these programs and we had done our research enough to know that it really came down to who was running the ship at the time. And add to that there is a huge turnover in that field.
 

MrRoot

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I read Principles of Addiction Medicine while in rehab and that is ASAM (American Society of Addiction Medicine) publication about everything related to addiction and treatment of it as medicinal problem.

One point I noticed that most of the states and counties allow non licensed treatment facilities to detox and rehab people and even support it by feeding those facilities with money that comes by pusing patients into them through criminal system and similar ways.

It is chilling fact that most rehabs are 12step oriented abstinence only facilities and that isn't even near today's scientifically proven methods.

I don't anymore wonder if people for example ask about if there are centers which allow using Suboxone when one comes inpatient to detox from alcohol...

Court systems should be informed more about what is going in addiction treatment instead of sticking into 1970-era.
 

D's

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Rehabs that are built around a 'community' process are the ones that seem to get better results, meaning it's a community ran treatment center, and the program director is there only to handle the fucked up shit (like someone getting high, bringing drugs, fighting, etc) while everything else is based on holding others accountable.
 

MrRoot

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Therapeutic Communities are really proven to be one of the best ways to organize rehab and there is an European twist also into it in which there is a trained staff that assists the community which runs the daily things and also is responsible for medical supervision and for individual therapies.

I spend two months in that kind of setting and it was an empowering experience and I got a lot of self-esteem out of it.

For example I haven't ever thought about doing stand-up or comedy myself but there I won a comedy competition held during May Day celebration. I made out a comedy character based on the facilitys Dr.

In my normal life I wouldn't ever participated one because my fear for failing out in front of an audience but in a community in which people get close and open minded towards other patients I was able to do it and learn that I am capable of that too.
 

EricC

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Dec 7, 2018
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This is my first post so I hope I?m doing this right. When I was 15, I was arrested for pot possession here in San Diego, where, for the courts, I was taken out of school and made to go to ?Freeway? run by none other than Bob Meehan. It?s really strange,but I remember my friends before that period, and directly after, quite vividly. Ages 15-18 tho, I can?t remember any person , counselor or peer or daily events. No faces, just the general knowledge that we did not stop drinking, smoking( with the counselors blessing) or experimenting with harder drugs. During this time I know I tried LSDd, shrooms, meth, and continued with the daily drinking smoking of cigs, and pot. I was not yet diagnosed bipolar/major depressive, despite the cutting, nor was I comfortable being gay. I would really like to talk to someone from that period...this was Freeway, San Diego, from ?83 to 86. Thanks..oh, still using now...
 

Axe To Grind

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This is my first post so I hope I?m doing this right. When I was 15, I was arrested for pot possession here in San Diego, where, for the courts, I was taken out of school and made to go to ?Freeway? run by none other than Bob Meehan. It?s really strange,but I remember my friends before that period, and directly after, quite vividly. Ages 15-18 tho, I can?t remember any person , counselor or peer or daily events. No faces, just the general knowledge that we did not stop drinking, smoking( with the counselors blessing) or experimenting with harder drugs. During this time I know I tried LSDd, shrooms, meth, and continued with the daily drinking smoking of cigs, and pot. I was not yet diagnosed bipolar/major depressive, despite the cutting, nor was I comfortable being gay. I would really like to talk to someone from that period...this was Freeway, San Diego, from ?83 to 86. Thanks..oh, still using now...
I was in Freeway from ‘85-‘86. I went to the solana beach satellite every day until I got sent to SLIC. I was one of the kids whose parents had money so naturally I had to go there. I got out, got on steering committee and stayed in the group until it closed. I went to the new programs and eventually counselor training in Dallas. I worked for multiple programs in multiple states until ‘96. I went in as a 16 year old kid and left at 27 with a kid of my own and zero experience living in the world other than that cult. Good times. It took me a while to figure things out. I wonder if I ever met you. I’m guessing that I did.
 

RedRum OG

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This shit is so upsetting. Taking advantage of someone near death with a very serious mental Illness, tricking their families

At the height of my benzo addiction I came out of a 3 month blackout to find myself in inpatient treatment. I came in at 180lbs, I left at 120lb, 45 days later. I had seizures, I didn't eat, leave my bed, or drink water for days at a time. Anybody who knows anything knows benzo wirhdrawal is not a situation where you can take car of yourself, getting to the bathroom, feeding yourself. I quite literally almost died because nobody checked on me for days or weeks at a time. I had doctors telling me the drug I was addicted to literally didn't exist (etizolam) and I was making it all up, they also believed that if they made me skip the methadone clinic and go 48 hours in between doses I wouldn't experience withdrawal (on top of benzo WD) because "methadone has a really long half life"

I am still heavily addicted to methadone and I desperately need to get off but my PTSD from that experience refuses to let me ever be trapped in a facility ever again

God damnit. I want off this ride
 

nuttynutskin

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This shit is so upsetting. Taking advantage of someone near death with a very serious mental Illness, tricking their families

At the height of my benzo addiction I came out of a 3 month blackout to find myself in inpatient treatment. I came in at 180lbs, I left at 120lb, 45 days later. I had seizures, I didn't eat, leave my bed, or drink water for days at a time. Anybody who knows anything knows benzo wirhdrawal is not a situation where you can take car of yourself, getting to the bathroom, feeding yourself. I quite literally almost died because nobody checked on me for days or weeks at a time. I had doctors telling me the drug I was addicted to literally didn't exist (etizolam) and I was making it all up, they also believed that if they made me skip the methadone clinic and go 48 hours in between doses I wouldn't experience withdrawal (on top of benzo WD) because "methadone has a really long half life"

I am still heavily addicted to methadone and I desperately need to get off but my PTSD from that experience refuses to let me ever be trapped in a facility ever again

God damnit. I want off this ride
That's beyond fucked. What the hell place was this? Should've taken legal action imo.
 

Mafioso

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after seeing how some places are ran first hand, part of the problem is even with regulations, the enforcing body is so small compared to what it'd need to catch all the shady people. It's a bit like OSHA and construction, if anyone has ever working construction- yes there are laws preventing a lot of unsafe stuff, but so long as the employer doesn't get caught, he wins at risk of his employee. Same type of scenario with these rehabs and detoxes. Sure, there are laws preventing unethical things like keeping a patient longer than necessary- but unless caught red handed, a lot of these violations are near impossible to prove, which is why they re so rampant.

RedRumOg, if you are in the US, I would absolutely file a complaint with the Department of Health Care Services, and keep as much evidence of your stay and mistreatment there. Even just writing a journal entry recounting the events as they come to you may help a lot, especially dates and times as these places are required to have 24hr camera surveillance for this type of bs. Even if it was a long time ago, you can still file a complaint and that will be on record and they will possibly be investigated to stop this type of mistreatment. Also, you could possibly report the doctors and counselors to their licensing/credentialing or ethics board. One complaint may not do much, but it will also go on record. If this was recent, you could also try and find a lawyer who specializes in this type of thing, as it would seem there's good reasons for lawsuit.

Personally, I would pay a counselor for IOP or just 1 on 1 sessions and go to my doctor to try and get detox meds/meds for illness, then stay with a loved one. That is essentially the same level of care if not better than most of these inpatient places. Unless they are ran highly professional, with no expense spared for the comfort of the resident(or free), they are a scam and largely a waste of money. For $1000/day(pretty standard charge) you could hire an in-house nurse and private counselor and probably get better care.

Granted, I'm a bit jaded, but as far as facts go, I don't think my words fall far from the truth. Sad part is tho, a lot of it is an insurance game, and you probably won't get insurance to pay for you staying at home, etc. I've found that so long as I have a stable environment and make sure to taper to a manageable amount, detoxing at home on my own and using support groups/networks has worked better. Maybe not at first for me, as I was pretty involved in the lifestyle so getting away helped, but eventually I had to come back home and was drawn back into the lifestyle, so who really knows.

Treatment has come a long way, but the way it's ran at many places is a nightmare. The turnover rate is extremely high and pay is low for most in the industry as well, with the exception of the owners, generally.
 
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