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Heroin do withdrawls get worse each time

Higherfocus420

Bluelighter
Joined
Apr 25, 2020
Messages
222
Location
uk
I've noticed that I get withdrawal symptoms from heroin even if I only use for a few days when I first started using I would never get any now if I use once I have lethargy for days
 

F.U.B.A.R.

Sr. Moderator: BDD, OD, EADD, LAVA
Staff member
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
21,418
Location
UK
Absolutely.

Opiate addiction is like building a fire. At first, it takes a while to get going. But keep feeding it and it soon becomes a roaring blaze.

You can eventually dampen the flames, but the embers are often still smouldering. If you don't abstain long enough for the embers to die, it only takes a little fuel to flare up again.

This is called 'the kindling effect'.

It can be largely overcome by not using for years, but there will always be some pesky charcoal left at the heart of the fire ready to reignite when fed.

Furthermore, your first withdrawal is the easiest because you don't know what to expect. My first rattle from what was a relatively small habit was sheer misery. But by day 10, I was pretty much back to normal. Then I scored again thinking that it would get easier with practice.

It doesn't.

Every subsequent rattle gets a little harder. I was never again able to get past day three without relapsing.

It took 20 years on and off methadone to finally get over that mistake...
 

cowboycurtis

Bluelighter
Joined
Dec 14, 2011
Messages
191
Absolutely.

Opiate addiction is like building a fire. At first, it takes a while to get going. But keep feeding it and it soon becomes a roaring blaze.

You can eventually dampen the flames, but the embers are often still smouldering. If you don't abstain long enough for the embers to die, it only takes a little fuel to flare up again.

This is called 'the kindling effect'.

It can be largely overcome by not using for years, but there will always be some pesky charcoal left at the heart of the fire ready to reignite when fed.

Furthermore, your first withdrawal is the easiest because you don't know what to expect. My first rattle from what was a relatively small habit was sheer misery. But by day 10, I was pretty much back to normal. Then I scored again thinking that it would get easier with practice.

It doesn't.

Every subsequent rattle gets a little harder. I was never again able to get past day three without relapsing.

It took 20 years on and off methadone to finally get over that mistake...
That’s a fantastic metaphor. For me and a lot of people heroin is a lot more insidious than other addictions. With like coke or meth it’s like a bomb going off instead of a fire. It’s a lot harder to maintain a long-term habit and shit tends to get crazy quicker. With heroin I’ll deny I have a problem for years. Until one day it’s no longer sustainable and no one came to warn you about it.
 

Higherfocus420

Bluelighter
Joined
Apr 25, 2020
Messages
222
Location
uk
Absolutely.

Opiate addiction is like building a fire. At first, it takes a while to get going. But keep feeding it and it soon becomes a roaring blaze.

You can eventually dampen the flames, but the embers are often still smouldering. If you don't abstain long enough for the embers to die, it only takes a little fuel to flare up again.

This is called 'the kindling effect'.

It can be largely overcome by not using for years, but there will always be some pesky charcoal left at the heart of the fire ready to reignite when fed.

Furthermore, your first withdrawal is the easiest because you don't know what to expect. My first rattle from what was a relatively small habit was sheer misery. But by day 10, I was pretty much back to normal. Then I scored again thinking that it would get easier with practice.

It doesn't.

Every subsequent rattle gets a little harder. I was never again able to get past day three without relapsing.

It took 20 years on and off methadone to finally get over that mistake...

Absolutely.

Opiate addiction is like building a fire. At first, it takes a while to get going. But keep feeding it and it soon becomes a roaring blaze.

You can eventually dampen the flames, but the embers are often still smouldering. If you don't abstain long enough for the embers to die, it only takes a little fuel to flare up again.

This is called 'the kindling effect'.

It can be largely overcome by not using for years, but there will always be some pesky charcoal left at the heart of the fire ready to reignite when fed.

Furthermore, your first withdrawal is the easiest because you don't know what to expect. My first rattle from what was a relatively small habit was sheer misery. But by day 10, I was pretty much back to normal. Then I scored again thinking that it would get easier with practice.

It doesn't.

Every subsequent rattle gets a little harder. I was never again able to get past day three without relapsing.

It took 20 years on and off methadone to finally get over that mistake...
I always forget how ruthless the can be to be honest I never ever use to get them could nod out all night then go to work roofing at heights bit dangerous but never gave duck and be using for periods of two weeks with no withdrawals or hangover of any kind now I get tired and achey with minimal use fucking peak man
 

tubgirl.jpg

Moderator: TL
Staff member
Joined
Jun 10, 2017
Messages
3,238
Location
Ö. Kågedalen
Absolutely.

Opiate addiction is like building a fire. At first, it takes a while to get going. But keep feeding it and it soon becomes a roaring blaze.

You can eventually dampen the flames, but the embers are often still smouldering. If you don't abstain long enough for the embers to die, it only takes a little fuel to flare up again.

This is called 'the kindling effect'.

It can be largely overcome by not using for years, but there will always be some pesky charcoal left at the heart of the fire ready to reignite when fed.

Furthermore, your first withdrawal is the easiest because you don't know what to expect. My first rattle from what was a relatively small habit was sheer misery. But by day 10, I was pretty much back to normal. Then I scored again thinking that it would get easier with practice.

It doesn't.

Every subsequent rattle gets a little harder. I was never again able to get past day three without relapsing.

It took 20 years on and off methadone to finally get over that mistake...
Fuck, I needed to read that. Thank you.
My mind has been on heroin these last couple of weeks - I almost scored some yesterday but got some ket instead.
Reading what you just wrote made me think back to all those hours on bathroom-floors, couches, beds, the pukes, the shits, the cramps, the crying, screaming, raging, the frayed nerves and the suicidal ideation.

Thank you, thank you, thank you.
 

TheAcetylationGame

Bluelighter
Joined
Dec 23, 2020
Messages
113
Location
City of Sails
Can’t even imagine how bad my wds would be these days! I feel like shit in the morning while waiting for my methadone to kick in (being a fast metaboliser sucks ass). It’s been like 7 or 8 years since I’ve been in actual withdrawal and that would be nothing in comparison to the hell of coming off my methadone dose, luckily I have no intention of ever coming off it so hopefully I never have to find out. Maintenance makes you a wuss for withdrawals lol 😂

But yeah in 2 or 3 days I don’t think I’d even be able to crawl to the toilet. Fuck that shit lol withdrawals are for quitters 😁

But yeah withdrawals definitely get harder over time and dependence re-establishes much faster
 

andrek159206

Bluelighter
Joined
Jul 23, 2019
Messages
225
Can’t even imagine how bad my wds would be these days! I feel like shit in the morning while waiting for my methadone to kick in (being a fast metaboliser sucks ass). It’s been like 7 or 8 years since I’ve been in actual withdrawal and that would be nothing in comparison to the hell of coming off my methadone dose, luckily I have no intention of ever coming off it so hopefully I never have to find out. Maintenance makes you a wuss for withdrawals lol 😂

But yeah in 2 or 3 days I don’t think I’d even be able to crawl to the toilet. Fuck that shit lol withdrawals are for quitters 😁

But yeah withdrawals definitely get harder over time and dependence re-establishes much faster
but what to do when you don't have access to the substance? opioids. how to decrease the pain of withdrawal?
 

TheAcetylationGame

Bluelighter
Joined
Dec 23, 2020
Messages
113
Location
City of Sails
but what to do when you don't have access to the substance? opioids. how to decrease the pain of withdrawal?
Well on methadone maintenance I have had constant access and not had to worry about that but back in my hey day I had so many tricks to stay well (disclaimer: most of them involved shoplifting and all but one involved theft of some sort...)

I used to shoplift 96 packs of codeine/apap (no longer otc in my country), shoplift 6 packs of diastop (diphenoxylate with an extremely small side of atropine, many people believe the atropine made them unsafe but if you calculated the atropine dose for even 6 packs it doesn’t even add up to a therapeutic atropine dose let alone a dangerous one, much nicer opioid than codeine, similar potency to pethidine but lasted fifteen plus hours, again no longer otc), shoplift as much gees linctus as possible (weak morphine syrup, tasted terrible could never get more than two down and had the equivalent of a shot of alcohol in each bottle, worst option thus far also no longer otc lol), shoplifting some loperamide can help but it always took high doses for me and there is evidence of cardio toxicity at high doses (somehow the most dangerous option remains otc smh) poppy seed tea is cheap and effective but varies in terms of opioid concentration so can potentially be dangerous for those who have low tolerance, at least that is still available from bulk food stores and some supermarkets, lower doses of dxm also provided some relief IME (also no longer available otc where I live haha)

and the most morally reprehensible method: raiding Family and friends medicine cabinet, would not recommend lol

but yeah luckily our methadone programme is pretty good so I haven’t had to experience real withdrawal in almost a decade
 

GetMeOutOfThisCRAP

Bluelighter
Joined
Dec 20, 2017
Messages
1,733
I have to almost disagree with the posts around here..

One of my worst withdrawals was from 30-40 milligrams of oxy daily. I was horrendously depressed and struggling sleeping for months upon months (around the beginning of my use). The later withdrawals from 80-120 milligrams were actually a little bit easier. Provided, this was because I knew what to expect by then and had magic tricks to ease the sickness. I wonder if in a way that tolerance just recedes and returns at random to a degree. Or how adjusted the body is currently (to the artificial endorphins from drug use). Some withdrawals were just okay while others of mine made me want to stop living lolol. And the doses for each sickness were virtually the same throughout the end of my using.

There's a lot about opiate withdrawal that is purely mental. For most of us that is the worst part... but we actually have the most control over the withdrawal mentally than physically. We all have a lot of head play during the sickness than we think. The restless legs though, not much you can do about that :ROFLMAO: People say clonodine.. but the side effects are a lot imo.

My short answer: Yes the withdrawals become physically and mentally worse each time you go through them. However, you almost build tolerance to how the sickness effects you. Therefore, as the withdrawals become much worse some parts of them may become better via experience of knowing what to expect.

*I know this is not HR but it almost could be seen as that. Some withdrawals are so bad that the user's behavior becomes very dangerous. They'll do anything out of desperation to get relief. Honestly, instead one can just stash a bunch of suboxone strips in an emergency drawer. If you know where to find opiates.. you can definitely find suboxone. There are sub doctors and some community centers that actually deal with suboxone and administering to them public. One could easily locate them per town. No matter who you are there will be times of unexpected forced cleanness. 2020 proves that substances are definitely affected by the state of the world lol. We can't always count on them being there so subs can be a godsend. Rather than spending the days in fetal position wondering why my life went wrong for two weeks, I'd personally rather just take a strip of suboxone and walk around fine. The existisitential dread from strong opiate withdrawal is unmatched :sneaky:
 
Last edited:

tarman

Bluelighter
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Messages
133
And there's cross-tolerance kindling with kratom too, imo. For me, the kratom withdrawal is hellish. Super mental, less physical. But like, even coming off 6g a day, it ain't pleasant. Just negative and depressed, but in a much more insidious way than straight up opiate withdrawal. And for me the reaction to dabbling in kratom for a week or three and then having a horrid emotional withdrawal that I didn't know was there- is partially because of kindling.
 

GetMeOutOfThisCRAP

Bluelighter
Joined
Dec 20, 2017
Messages
1,733
And there's cross-tolerance kindling with kratom too, imo. For me, the kratom withdrawal is hellish. Super mental, less physical. But like, even coming off 6g a day, it ain't pleasant. Just negative and depressed, but in a much more insidious way than straight up opiate withdrawal. And for me the reaction to dabbling in kratom for a week or three and then having a horrid emotional withdrawal that I didn't know was there- is partially because of kindling.

Kratom use made my opioid tolerance go from 20-40 milligrams daily to 120+ lol.

After my attempted quit on opioids via only kratom, I relapsed on pills after a year and it was crazy how high my tolerance was from not even using opioids at all.
 

Bomb319

Bluelighter
Joined
Nov 26, 2011
Messages
583
Location
Kelowna, B.C.
Absolutely.

Opiate addiction is like building a fire. At first, it takes a while to get going. But keep feeding it and it soon becomes a roaring blaze.

You can eventually dampen the flames, but the embers are often still smouldering. If you don't abstain long enough for the embers to die, it only takes a little fuel to flare up again.

This is called 'the kindling effect'.

It can be largely overcome by not using for years, but there will always be some pesky charcoal left at the heart of the fire ready to reignite when fed.

Furthermore, your first withdrawal is the easiest because you don't know what to expect. My first rattle from what was a relatively small habit was sheer misery. But by day 10, I was pretty much back to normal. Then I scored again thinking that it would get easier with practice.

It doesn't.

Every subsequent rattle gets a little harder. I was never again able to get past day three without relapsing.

It took 20 years on and off methadone to finally get over that mistake...

This is exactly my problem with methadone. "Well, I have 6 doses with me now! I'll just take more than I should since I'm feeling so shitty...after all, I'm sure I can handle the next time I can't eat, sleep and am climbing the walls with anxiety!"

Every. Time.

I've been off IV and all illegal drugs for about 6 years now, so in a way methadone has certainly helped. But in another more insidious, persistent way, the only thing that's changed is my dealer - now my doctor and pharmacist. This certainly isn't to say methadone hasn't been an enormous help for lots of people...I just can't seem to exercise any real control.
 

PDXman

Bluelighter
Joined
Nov 23, 2018
Messages
53
Location
West Coast
I've noticed that I get withdrawal symptoms from heroin even if I only use for a few days when I first started using I would never get any now if I use once I have lethargy for days
For me, it most definitely gets worse. I kicked heroin the first time when I was 19. When I was 58, I kicked for the 5th time. I truly thought I was dying, and only went through 24 hours of symptoms. (I was in a rehab that time). The first three times I kicked, I went cold turkey. The kick at 58 was worse than cold turkey, and it left me with restless leg spasms/cramps in my arms and legs that have never left. The withdrawal at 58 was so bad, it's kept me off the shit for almost 12 years. Now, I'm almost 70, still get high on pot, meth, and occasionally mushrooms, but I'm afraid of heroin because I don't think I'd go through another withdrawal.
Hopefully this helps.
Peace
PDXman
 
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