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News Bluelight Research on Ketamine as a Treatment for Depression and PTSD

Bluelight Research on Ketamine as a Treatment for Depression and PTSD


Bluelight would like to congratulate Tharcila Chaves and her colleagues on their recent publication: The use of ketamine to cope with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder: A qualitative analysis of the discourses posted on a popular online forum. The paper was published in The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse.


The abstract is quoted below:

Background
Because of the shortcomings of traditional pharmacotherapy for major depressive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), there has been growing interest in the rapid mood-enhancing effect of ketamine.

Objectives
To analyze what has been posted about ketamine use for dealing with self-reported depression and/or PTSD on one of the biggest international message boards on the internet.

Methods
Qualitative study with online observation of threaded discussions on Bluelight. In-depth online searches were conducted in 2018. Twenty-nine threads, with a total of 708 units of analysis, were selected and subjected to content analysis, where, via a coding process, the units of analysis were organized into nodes.

Results
Despite having several negative effects (e.g. dizziness, nausea and inability to talk), the examined discourses suggested that the use of ketamine to elevate mood was both efficient and worthwhile. Intranasal use was the most common route of administration mentioned. We traced how the mood enhancement caused by ketamine is perceived: the loss of pleasure disappears, as well as the depressed mood; the markedly diminished interest in activities vanishes and motivation comes back. From all the posts analyzed, only two reported negative outcomes (i.e. no mood-enhancing effect). The most mentioned adverse event was damage to the urinary bladder and the kidneys in cases of misuse.

Conclusion
Although online research of user-generated content has its limitations in terms of reliability and validity, the present study adds relevant information on the use of ketamine for managing depression and PTSD, whether this use is done legally or not.



Annotated version of the final paragraph in the conclusion of the article is quoted below:

Ketamine appears to be a potential tool in managing depressive symptoms. The increasing popularity of ketamine clinics and the FDA approval of esketamine for TRD (treatment resistant depression) say a lot about the current status of off-label ketamine: it seems to work in several situations and people are already benefiting from it (not only people living with depression or PTSD; another popular off-label use of ketamine is for treating chronic pain). Ketamine has the potential to benefit a big group of patients who do not respond to the available therapies. It is considered by the World Health Organization an essential medicine and restricting it has harmed patients, with no reduction in recreational use. More scientific research is needed, naturally, but there is already a substantial amount of data suggesting that ketamine is effective and safe. “If they don’t bring us the treatment, we will make it ourselves”, a T1 member stated (Bluelight quote from thread no. 1). From the black market to the white coat, ketamine as a mood enhancer has been presenting positive results in handling depression and PTSD, giving a novel approach to the pathophysiology and therapy of these conditions.


I think we should be proud to have contributed to an article that advocated greater availability of ketamine as a medicine for depression and PTSD. :)


Note that the full-text article is behind a paywall, but if you have issues accessing and want the pdf, send an email to [email protected]
 
Bluelight Research on Ketamine as a Treatment for Depression and PTSD


Bluelight would like to congratulate Tharcila Chaves and her colleagues on their recent publication: The use of ketamine to cope with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder: A qualitative analysis of the discourses posted on a popular online forum. The paper was published in The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse.


The abstract is quoted below:

Background
Because of the shortcomings of traditional pharmacotherapy for major depressive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), there has been growing interest in the rapid mood-enhancing effect of ketamine.

Objectives
To analyze what has been posted about ketamine use for dealing with self-reported depression and/or PTSD on one of the biggest international message boards on the internet.

Methods
Qualitative study with online observation of threaded discussions on Bluelight. In-depth online searches were conducted in 2018. Twenty-nine threads, with a total of 708 units of analysis, were selected and subjected to content analysis, where, via a coding process, the units of analysis were organized into nodes.

Results
Despite having several negative effects (e.g. dizziness, nausea and inability to talk), the examined discourses suggested that the use of ketamine to elevate mood was both efficient and worthwhile. Intranasal use was the most common route of administration mentioned. We traced how the mood enhancement caused by ketamine is perceived: the loss of pleasure disappears, as well as the depressed mood; the markedly diminished interest in activities vanishes and motivation comes back. From all the posts analyzed, only two reported negative outcomes (i.e. no mood-enhancing effect). The most mentioned adverse event was damage to the urinary bladder and the kidneys in cases of misuse.

Conclusion
Although online research of user-generated content has its limitations in terms of reliability and validity, the present study adds relevant information on the use of ketamine for managing depression and PTSD, whether this use is done legally or not.



Annotated version of the final paragraph in the conclusion of the article is quoted below:

Ketamine appears to be a potential tool in managing depressive symptoms. The increasing popularity of ketamine clinics and the FDA approval of esketamine for TRD (treatment resistant depression) say a lot about the current status of off-label ketamine: it seems to work in several situations and people are already benefiting from it (not only people living with depression or PTSD; another popular off-label use of ketamine is for treating chronic pain). Ketamine has the potential to benefit a big group of patients who do not respond to the available therapies. It is considered by the World Health Organization an essential medicine and restricting it has harmed patients, with no reduction in recreational use. More scientific research is needed, naturally, but there is already a substantial amount of data suggesting that ketamine is effective and safe. “If they don’t bring us the treatment, we will make it ourselves”, a T1 member stated (Bluelight quote from thread no. 1). From the black market to the white coat, ketamine as a mood enhancer has been presenting positive results in handling depression and PTSD, giving a novel approach to the pathophysiology and therapy of these conditions.


I think we should be proud to have contributed to an article that advocated greater availability of ketamine as a medicine for depression and PTSD. :)


Note that the full-text article is behind a paywall, but if you have issues accessing and want the pdf, send an email to [email protected]
Bluelight Research on Ketamine as a Treatment for Depression and PTSD


Bluelight would like to congratulate Tharcila Chaves and her colleagues on their recent publication: The use of ketamine to cope with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder: A qualitative analysis of the discourses posted on a popular online forum. The paper was published in The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse.


The abstract is quoted below:

Background
Because of the shortcomings of traditional pharmacotherapy for major depressive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), there has been growing interest in the rapid mood-enhancing effect of ketamine.

Objectives
To analyze what has been posted about ketamine use for dealing with self-reported depression and/or PTSD on one of the biggest international message boards on the internet.

Methods
Qualitative study with online observation of threaded discussions on Bluelight. In-depth online searches were conducted in 2018. Twenty-nine threads, with a total of 708 units of analysis, were selected and subjected to content analysis, where, via a coding process, the units of analysis were organized into nodes.

Results
Despite having several negative effects (e.g. dizziness, nausea and inability to talk), the examined discourses suggested that the use of ketamine to elevate mood was both efficient and worthwhile. Intranasal use was the most common route of administration mentioned. We traced how the mood enhancement caused by ketamine is perceived: the loss of pleasure disappears, as well as the depressed mood; the markedly diminished interest in activities vanishes and motivation comes back. From all the posts analyzed, only two reported negative outcomes (i.e. no mood-enhancing effect). The most mentioned adverse event was damage to the urinary bladder and the kidneys in cases of misuse.

Conclusion
Although online research of user-generated content has its limitations in terms of reliability and validity, the present study adds relevant information on the use of ketamine for managing depression and PTSD, whether this use is done legally or not.



Annotated version of the final paragraph in the conclusion of the article is quoted below:

Ketamine appears to be a potential tool in managing depressive symptoms. The increasing popularity of ketamine clinics and the FDA approval of esketamine for TRD (treatment resistant depression) say a lot about the current status of off-label ketamine: it seems to work in several situations and people are already benefiting from it (not only people living with depression or PTSD; another popular off-label use of ketamine is for treating chronic pain). Ketamine has the potential to benefit a big group of patients who do not respond to the available therapies. It is considered by the World Health Organization an essential medicine and restricting it has harmed patients, with no reduction in recreational use. More scientific research is needed, naturally, but there is already a substantial amount of data suggesting that ketamine is effective and safe. “If they don’t bring us the treatment, we will make it ourselves”, a T1 member stated (Bluelight quote from thread no. 1). From the black market to the white coat, ketamine as a mood enhancer has been presenting positive results in handling depression and PTSD, giving a novel approach to the pathophysiology and therapy of these conditions.


I think we should be proud to have contributed to an article that advocated greater availability of ketamine as a medicine for depression and PTSD. :)


Note that the full-text article is behind a paywall, but if you have issues accessing and want the pdf, send an email to [email protected]
In Israel we have used it in PTSD within the IDF going on 3-decades now. PTSD is not that common here. only the last decade or so is de-Class. The latest trend is mega-dosaging.. anyway, if it may further PTSD Treatment in the West, all for it. Good luck
 
It's easier to kill yourself off OTC paracetamol than with a dissociative probably.
If your intent is to commit suicide maybe. But you don't get addicted to paracetamol and overuse it destroy internal organs (see ketamine and organ damage sticky thread in the psych forum).


Famous DJ Eric morillo recently died of a ketamine overdose per the medical examiner, a rare thing indeed tho but K use in general is rare so factor that in.. He didn't want to kill himself, the drug is just so addictive you keep doing more and more. This is not a characteristic of paracetamol.

Paracetamol doesn't cause you to have a compete break with reality amd run out into traffic Ala pcp (yes mxe can do this too). I've IVed mxe and lost total touch with reality and all control of my actions psychotically screaming walking into furniture destroying the house.

Another friend was naked running the streets on mxe just like PCP. Was hogtied by the cops. Definitely potential to kill oneself due to the moreishness and addictivness of dissociative either by progressive organ damage though chronic use or just being shot by the cops or being run over by overdosing.
 
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PCP is still fairly common in parts of the US & back in the 1980s everyone knew 116 to 145. All those fairytales on PCP? They are simply fairytales- like "Krokodile" eatimg all the way throigh bodied. If a person is "Suicidal," they will find a way and it wont be in clinical setting where they watched sometimes 24/7 vis CCTV or by notation. Some Suicidal person is not gonna sneak out a study. They dont give him a baggie full of Rx pure. He has a controlled or even a placebo. Offing oneselg tragically is not difficult. Because you had a negative experience with Ketamine or any Dissasociative is a lame reason totry & disrupt a study in a clinical setting. I will re-iterate, it has really helped Military PTSD and in the IDF what you would most likely consifder massive doses have had absolutely remarkable results, sonmuch that in NYC there is at least one paycho-social outfit using Ketamine regularly for a range of traumatic experienced.

Thank G-d I have no need for it bit I think anyone else should be denied an oportunitity(ird) to try and get ast whatever harmed them.
 
If your intent is to commit suicide maybe. But you don't get addicted to paracetamol and overuse it destroy internal organs (see ketamine and organ damage sticky thread in the psych forum).


Famous DJ Eric morillo recently died of a ketamine overdose per the medical examiner, a rare thing indeed tho but K use in general is rare so factor that in.. He didn't want to kill himself, the drug is just so addictive you keep doing more and more. This is not a characteristic of paracetamol.

Paracetamol doesn't cause you to have a compete break with reality amd run out into traffic Ala pcp (yes mxe can do this too). I've IVed mxe and lost total touch with reality and all control of my actions psychotically screaming walking into furniture destroying the house.

Another friend was naked running the streets on mxe just like PCP. Was hogtied by the cops. Definitely potential to kill oneself due to the moreishness and addictivness of dissociative either by progressive organ damage though chronic use or just being shot by the cops or being run over by overdosing.
Pretty sure you'd need to consume upwards of 10,000mg to overdose on ketamine - although whatever happened to elijah McCain is an anomaly to me maybe someone could clarify
 
I got to say I got my hands on an 8-ball when I was working in the most depressing job, well, one of the most depressing jobs I've ever worked and to be honest it was the only thing that brought sunshine into my world. My girlfriend would talk to me daily and I would apologize for calling and say that I'm sorry I called, I shouldn't have called, I have nothing good to say today. I started bumping ketamine after work at 150 to 200 mg a day after work and there was Sunshine again, I had good things to say, we had an open conversation about things we want to change in our lives, we talked about getting her off of her IUD and making sure that we're both healthy. We made plans, we had a couple laughs. It was genuinely one of the most abrupt 180 degree reversals of attitude and mood I've ever experienced in my life. Mind you in a non-medical sitting but it was significantly positive.
 
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I got to say I got my hands on an 8-ball when I was working in the most depressing job well, one of the most depressing jobs I've ever worked and to be honest it was the only thing that brought sunshine into my world. My girlfriend would talk to me daily and I would apologize for calling and say that I'm sorry I called, I shouldn't have called, I have nothing good to say today. I started bumping ketamine after work at 150 to 200 mg a day after work and there was Sunshine again, I had good things to say, we had an open conversation about things we want to change in our lives , we talked about getting her off of her IUD and making sure that we're both healthy. We made plans, we had a couple laughs. It was genuinely one of the most abrupt 180 degree reversals of attitude and mood I've ever experienced in my life. Mind you in a non-medical sitting but it was significantly positive
Ketamine does just renew. It’s the king cache dumper IME with no comebacks.

Recreationally, it’s drawn some stigma, most of all due to bladder problems for some, but not all. And dissociatives are seen as a bit risky. I see ketamine much safer there, less likely to get disconnected from reality in your own head, because you always come back so fresh and free feeling it’s like picking up again.

Like, when the ket has worn off, you’re your full normal self.

I’ve known people get silly abusing K, I used 3-5 grams a week for about 2 years.

It just cost me wages. It never took over, was always balanced, for fun.

Now ketamine would not be under such limelight for mental health and PTSD if it wasn’t actually extraordinarily emotionally cleansing,

It’s more than just recreational.

At 41 now, so many conditions and scars from an abnormally intense and difficult life path, I NEED ketamine therapy myself.

Except it’s SO expensive. Like 500 quid one session!

I would need injecting as allergies no way sniff.

If I got some pure K privately, I could Intramuscular inject, but have never injected in my life, not exactly needle phobic but it does daunt me.
 
i haven't

i still haven't done any since then....im at 10 days since last launch 🤩
Cool. 22 here, But I’ve just realised that it’s going to be a crying shame if I don’t have at least one spectacular visual trip while our splendidly beautiful auto flowers are eminently about the prime.

We’ll see. I’d be considering a 5 or 600 ug plug.
 
i still wanna do the wake-up at 3:30 and dose - i woke up a couple nights ago right at 3:30am and i totally thought about it but fell back to sleep because they weren't close by....so i put them close by in case it happens again :cool:
 
I tried plugging 40 and 80 mg the other day. Didn't really do what I thought it was going to, it did get me Ketted up, but not like bumps or shots.

YMMV
 
Ketamine is AMAZING. I took 25mg twice a week for a month or two... Depression was completely gone. Shit's like magic.

If anyone is having trouble, definitely give it a shot! ... I'm not a fan of it 'recreationally' but 25mg gives an interesting buzz. I just sat back, closed my eyes, and listened to music. Wore off in about 45-60 minutes. (I used pharma-grade IV/IM ketamine)
 
Forgive my butting in here but I see somebody else has asked this same (or similar) question above but it's been overlooked or ignored for some reason.

I've seen these articles posted here re: Ketamine over the months and its supposed magic in the treatment of treatment resistant depression and PTSD (and I assume "treatment resistant depression" is in reference to the usual suspects e.g. SSRI's and SNRI's to name but two and that have failed miserably in oh so many instances so far as I can tell).

Assuming a patient (person) could get their hands on legit pharmaceutical Ketamine then why could they not administer and treat themselves (emphasis on the word "treat" as opposed to "abuse" or "recreation" of course).

We too have Ketamine Clinics here (South Africa). What I don't understand (hence my butting in here): the costs of treatment, assuming their minimum recommended number of sessions, pretty much add up to the equivalent of a small car at the end of the day (exaggerating slightly, obviously, for effect but you get the picture). I understand that the costs of the medical apparatus used and the personnel involved and all that goes with running one of these clinics add up of course. But something seems out of kilter to me given the cost of the substance itself especially when you consider the amounts of the substance used in these treatments.

Is it the process of slow infusion that works the magic (hence the medical apparatus involved)? Or does the medical setting in and of itself have a placebo effect? Both maybe?

I guess to be blunt: what's the difference between somebody who is depressed or has PTSD getting hold of this stuff and slamming it (or even slowly infusing it over a period by manual means) with the exact same dosages as detailed by the clinics and going to a clinic (let's for a minute remove the patient monitoring apparatus and personnel from the equation for the sake of expediency). To put it even more bluntly: somebody who has found themselves in need of such treatments I doubt, very much, could care less about monitoring at that point.

Worth mentioning that my research on this topic has not been limited to ONLY here. There's boatloads of glowing reports on this stuff floating around for the treatment of treatment resistant depression and PTSD so who am I to argue (and I'm not arguing actually i.e. there's too many papers and too much research having been done for this to be bogus or simply a placebo). But the above are all reasonable questions to be asking no?

Another question that's worth asking: I know for a fact there's more than a few members around here that use (or abuse) Ketamine. Did any of those members previously suffer from depression or PTSD and all is now fine or what? Assuming the difference between use as as treatment and abuse simply to get high: is that what makes the difference? In other words as a treatment it's the shit but once you exceed a certain threshold (quantity) (abuse) that's when other problems begin to manifest themselves?
 
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