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Biking Nerds Unite

beagleboy

Bluelighter
Joined
Apr 13, 2010
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6,239
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MEAT DEPARTMENT/Supermarkets 7:59am
Only a bit of fun but you must be one of those fucking militant cyclists who thinks that every other road user should bow down before them....pfft!
I sent you a pm with my apology.
Thanks for bringing the healthy living biking nerds unite thread a bit O humor in the closing months of bike weather this season.

If you have any bike related questions this is an excellant source.

Thank you too Jah. Nice catch brother.
 

JahSEEuS

Ex-Bluelighter
Joined
May 6, 2011
Messages
6,459
Yea, beags no prob. I love your vivacity and passion for biking.
Don't ever change. Unless you want to. Then do that.

You cool af, hopefully we can ride together some day. You ever consider riding up the coast?
 

beagleboy

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Apr 13, 2010
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Location
MEAT DEPARTMENT/Supermarkets 7:59am
Hey ugh, I'm currently wondering about my snow-bound brothers. How they're gonna do it in the winter months. Chiefly if they have any experience with a studded tire "snow bike"? Do you?
In 2010 I made some custom studded tires. Took 8 hours to make two.
 

JahSEEuS

Ex-Bluelighter
Joined
May 6, 2011
Messages
6,459
that looks badass af. we have a bunch of snow bikers 'round here. I usually hang it up for the winter myself, though. Doesn't that effect the tube? I'd be interested in putting something like this together. Do you have any info on the best way to put this into practice?
 

beagleboy

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Yea, I used the very thick slime brand tubes and also used a n old inner tube as a barrier between the tube and the tire to prevent the screw heads from puncturing the tire. Never had a flat.
I paid $30 for the brand name tires and like $16 for pan head sheet metal screws. I used a table saw with a stiff sandpaper like blade to grind down the sharp screws to something usable. That is very much key to making truly usable performance studded tires.



I picked this 26in 15 speed Shimano sis equipped mountain bike. Im cleaning it and replacing all the cables and brake pads and asking $45 for it. It's a nice example of a rigid steel frame DepRtment store bike! This is the shit I do on the side and is a breeze and rewarding for me.

 

JahSEEuS

Ex-Bluelighter
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you sell that sucka yet?

this is more just a beagle-signal ala the bat-signal.

hope you're doing a-ok dude.
 

belligerent drunk

Bluelight Crew
Joined
Sep 16, 2015
Messages
3,483
Bought new mountain bikes for me and my wife 2 months ago. Scott bikes with 29" wheels, disc brakes, mine got 27 gears, hers 30; mine's regular aluminium, hers is a lighter version. Pics below under NSFW tags. What I'm wondering is how come her brakes work so much better. Her front brake is significantly bigger than the rear, or my front (my front brake is as big as my and her rear). Both her front and rear breaks are immensely "sharp" with me on the bike, mines are great but feel much inferior. Both are hydraulic Shimano breaks.

Other than that I'm very satisfied with our bikes. I've already got 900 km from random biking with and without our son.

NSFW:


Oh, and a heavy drug user here. Still very fit from my track and field days. Although I'm starting to adapt the stereotypical cyclist's body shape with enormous leg muscles and average arm muscles. OK, my arms are still fine, but if I continue like this, I'll start looking pretty funny. Sort of like bodybuilders who skip leg days, only the opposite.
 

beagleboy

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Joined
Apr 13, 2010
Messages
6,239
Location
MEAT DEPARTMENT/Supermarkets 7:59am
Bought new mountain bikes for me and my wife 2 months ago. Scott bikes with 29" wheels, disc brakes, mine got 27 gears, hers 30; mine's regular aluminium, hers is a lighter version. Pics below under NSFW tags. What I'm wondering is how come her brakes work so much better. Her front brake is significantly bigger than the rear, or my front (my front brake is as big as my and her rear). Both her front and rear breaks are immensely "sharp" with me on the bike, mines are great but feel much inferior. Both are hydraulic Shimano breaks.

Other than that I'm very satisfied with our bikes. I've already got 900 km from random biking with and without our son.

NSFW:


Oh, and a heavy drug user here. Still very fit from my track and field days. Although I'm starting to adapt the stereotypical cyclist's body shape with enormous leg muscles and average arm muscles. OK, my arms are still fine, but if I continue like this, I'll start looking pretty funny. Sort of like bodybuilders who skip leg days, only the opposite.
The size of the rotors matters: bigger rotors equal more stopping force. The biggest is 203mm, then 180 and the smallest is 160mm. “Rotors or disks” are the round thing attached to the wheel. Calipers are the thing that squeezes the rotor. Sorry if you already know this. Wasn’t sure.
If you upgrade to a bigger rotor you have to buy the correct size adapter also. It’s the black u-shaped bracket that attaches your hydraulic brake caliper to the frame or fork.

Stickyness or “grabbiness” is due very largely to the type of brake pads that you have. They come in either organic compound or metallic sintered.
Organic brake pads wear out faster and are more grabby. They are also much nosier. Honk honk! People call it the dreaded turkey call.
Metallic sintered last longer than organic and start to work after they heat up. They’re used a lot on downhill bikes.

Personally I use 1 organic and 1 metallic sintered brake pad on my front and rear hydro brakes.
 
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beagleboy

Bluelighter
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Apr 13, 2010
Messages
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Location
MEAT DEPARTMENT/Supermarkets 7:59am
Belligerent drunk: I looked at your photos. Your front rotor is a 160mm. You want to upgrade to a 180mm or a 203mm. Your bike manufacturer made that bikes brake system very very underpowered when they built it. Like seriously man, I can’t believe they put the smallest size rotor on the front.
It’d be like $20 for a 180 or 203 rotor and like $15 for the adaptor. And like $8 s&h. Itd be a smart upgrade and one that you would feel also.

If you’d like, I could look on eBay and help you select the right size. No problem. I love to help fellow blue light bikers.


Your wife’s front rotor looks like a 180mm. And your front is a 160mm. That’s why her braking is better than yours. I recommend a 203mm for front ( or at least a 180mm ) and a 160mm or a 180mm for rear.

Oh yea, I like your bikes fenders and the orange rear wheel reflectors. You don’t see orange reflectors that often. I have them in my bike. The black bike has Kenda tires. I too run Kenda tires.
 
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beagleboy

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Apr 13, 2010
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Location
MEAT DEPARTMENT/Supermarkets 7:59am
Same goes for other riders on this forum. I have a lot of free time right now and if you have any bike related questions or are having a hard time diagnosing whats wrong with your bike, don’t hesitate to ask me.
 

belligerent drunk

Bluelight Crew
Joined
Sep 16, 2015
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Thanks for the detailed answer, beagleboy! I know how disc brakes work, been using disc brake bikes for many many years now.

It's a long story, but I don't have that bike anymore. I got a new one. Here's the pic:

NSFW:


This bike is a major improvement, it weighs about 12.5 kg and the front brake is slightly bigger. This bike doesn't have the same braking issue - its brakes work great.

I have another question though. The new bike has 2 gears in the middle and 11 in the back, making 22 total. What's the rationale here? I was thinking to decrease weight, but 1 extra cog is not that much, is it?

Have you posted a picture of your bike somewhere in this thread?
 
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beagleboy

Bluelighter
Joined
Apr 13, 2010
Messages
6,239
Location
MEAT DEPARTMENT/Supermarkets 7:59am
Thanks for the detailed answer, beagleboy! I know how disc brakes work, been using disc brake bikes for many many years now.

It's a long story, but I don't have that bike anymore. I got a new one. Here's the pic:

NSFW:


This bike is a major improvement, it weighs about 12.5 kg and the front brake is slightly bigger. This bike doesn't have the same braking issue - its breaks work great.

I have another question though. The new bike has 2 gears in the middle and 11 in the back, making 22 total. What's the rationale here? I was thinking to decrease weight, but 1 extra cog is not that much, is it?

Have you posted a picture of your bike somewhere in this thread?
Scott is a good brand bike. What does it have for shifters/derailers?

I have the 1990 Cannondale Killer V 900. In seasons 1 and 2 on the Seinfeld tv show this same bike was hanging up in front of Jerry’s bathroom. In season 2 episode 8 they switched to the green Klein. My dad bought it New for $1000 in 1991.


2005 Jamis Dakar xlt. Candy Apple red powder coat paint. My first full suspension frame. Bought frame for $150 off Craigslist!!


Fully custom 2010 Jamis Parker 2: built this piece by piece. Fox shock, Marzochi fork, 10mm axles, hope pro evo 2 front wheel ($250 ) etc etc. I spent a lot of time building this bike. It’s super fast and really fun to ride. The suspension soaks up all the bumps making it seem like a Cadillac.




This is what I’m into this year. It’s a 1991 chromoly steel Japanese made Univega Alpina pro. My dad paid $700 for it new in 1992.
It’s mechanically perfect and offers a different ride than my full suspension and hydro brake bikes. It’s super light. I replaced the cantilever brakes with V-brakes, installed very stiff Jagwire cables on brakes and shifters, carbon fiber front derailer, carbon seatpost, 2.35 tires fit the frame just barely, SRAM wheelset, 10 speed rear cassette, two chainrings in front, SRAM x7 shifters, titanium rail saddle. I’m against putting a suspension fork on the front even though I have an extra one laying around. This is a great example of a rigid bike. You can really feel the terrain your riding on.



There’s better pictures of my purple bike in this thread a few pages back too.
 
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hydroazuanacaine

bluelighter
Joined
May 17, 2007
Messages
7,800
sold my car earlier this year and had been busing around. got sick of it taking 45 minutes to go 5 miles, so bought a 1992 trek 700 off craigslist. mostly been using it to get around, but went joyriding with it for the first time yesterday. 30 miles up and down the lakefront trail.

did about 10 miles today, for the sake of transportation. it's a rush biking in city traffic.


that's my bike. everything is original except the saddle, which was replaced by a previous owner. even the tires, which seem fine despite being decades old.

while waiting for my food, i was keeping on eye on it through the restaurant window. because i bolted it to a street sign too thick to include the back wheel in the U. these kids set two hackie sacks or some sort of bean bag toys on the seat and started taking pics of it. then one of them bent down and i figured they were about flip the quick releases. i was getting ready to fly out the door and give chase. instead the kid just took more pictures. it looked like they were photographing the drivetrain. or maybe getting a lower perspective of their bean bags. while i think it's cool, it's certainly not a high-end bike. maybe they're into bikes and noticed the old school biopace chainrings, which are making a comeback. i wanted to lean out the door and ask them what they were doing, but i figured that would scare them away. so i'm left curious. is taking pictures of hackie sacks on different objects the new planking?

that alpina pro looks nice, beagleboy.
 
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