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Opioids Any stimulant opiates known?

d-DEX-25

Greenlighter
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I am interested due to recent exposure to a peculiar fent analog about any possible known opioids that also display stimulant effects.

I know only of one which is kratom of course or really mitragynine which displays a strong stimulant effect but there must exist others?

Are there any perhaps mu agonists that also display strong dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, kappa, or delta stimulant properties? There must be some literature on this subject but so far my searches have been unable to locate such substances.

I know fentanyl has strong dopamine/serotongenic mediated effects but they do not seem to be stimulant in nature. I do know opiates seem to have some mild stimulant like effects in low doses but usually only pertaining to increases in motivation not direct stimulant effects.

Please post canidates so i may write a paper for college on this subject. Thank you.
 

Shortec Stublue!!

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Oxy is (in my opinion) the one that comes to mind. It is not stimulating in the sense phenethylamine’s are, but motivation as oppose to nodding or sedation, is definitely apparent!!
 

Nicomorphinist

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There are oxycodone, tramadol, and tramadol plus oxy, in addition there are others like lefetamine and apparently several of the benzimidazole opioids which have intrinsic stimulant activity. Tianeptine could be in this category as well. The semi-synthetic morphine derivative 2,4-dinitrophenylmorphine is a molecule derived from fusing morphine with dinitrophenyl, a stimulant particularly of the metabolism and respiration.
 
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Nicomorphinist

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my favourite combo is tramadol plus oxy, sometimes I find that caffeine potentiates the trams a little
I also found that it stretched out my supplies of both more than I expected -- I settled in at 40 per cent of the usual dose of tramadol and 36 per cent of the dihydrocodeine and about the same for the other codeine, DHC, and codone type drugs. This was also helped as I increased my hydroxyzine dose to fine-tune the tramadol effects such as dizziness and insomnia. The extended-release tramadol and extended-release dihydrocodeine worked especially well, as did extended-release codeine.
 

Nicomorphinist

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It certainly seems to me to come from the serotonin level, and tramadol and tapentadol are the two opioids which can make me really dizzy in some cases if I am not vigilant about interactions . . . I found that these cases of dizziness respond well to cyproheptadine, the first-generation antihistamine marketed as Periactin and someone who has the same experience tells me that CBD oil actually reduces any dizziness quite a bit.
 

Shortec Stublue!!

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Yes I think you are right @sekio, Inhibition of the transporter of both if I remember from class. Also contributed to causing serotonin syndrome somehow over the years!!
 

Nicomorphinist

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In several writings, William S Burroughs expounded about the stimulation of oxycodone, which he was getting as Eukodal ampoules and IVing. He said that it felt like C-Jam and hit the pleasure centre in the brain directly . . . a little later he opined that the oxygen bridge(s) on the molecule could have something to do with it.
 

Jekyl Anhydride

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Oxycodone hits the Kappa opioid receptor harder than most others and it seems like a correlation might lie there. For chronic users there's also the altering of the opioid receptors a,B,y- G coupled protein from inhibitory to stimulatory. Which is why Ultra low dose naltrexone is so effective in stopping tolerance and reestablishing potency with opioids. The naltrexone resets the GCP imbalance that occurs from chronic use. Or prevents the tolerance and imbalance in the first place.

Here it is:
"Ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists enhance opioid analgesia and reduce analgesic tolerance and dependence by preventing a G protein coupling switch (Gi/o to Gs) by the mu opioid receptor (MOR), although the binding site of such ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists was previously unknown. Here we show that with approximately 200-fold higher affinity than for the mu opioid receptor, naloxone binds a pentapeptide segment of the scaffolding protein filamin A, known to interact with the mu opioid receptor, to disrupt its chronic opioid-induced Gs coupling." https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2212716/
 
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