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3D printing drugs – New technology to revolutionize medical industry

neversickanymore

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3D printing drugs – New technology to revolutionize medical industry
August 22, 2014

Scientists believe they have come up with a way to print drugs, using a 3D printer. They say they can create a capsule, which can be swallowed, and it will also allow doctors to alter a dosage according to the specific requirements.

A team of researchers, from the Louisiana Tech University, believes they have come up with a solution to find a biodegradable material, which could be used to contain everyday drugs, as well as chemotherapeutic compounds for those needing cancer treatments. The 3D printer would be able to create the capsule, meaning that medicine only needs to be inserted before it is sealed, Science Daily reports.

"After identifying the usefulness of the 3D printers, we realized there was an opportunity for rapid prototyping using this fabrication method," said Jeffery Weisman, who is a doctoral student in Louisiana Tech's biomedical engineering program. "Through the addition of nanoparticles and/or other additives, this technology becomes much more viable using a common 3D printing material that is already biocompatible. The material can be loaded with antibiotics or other medicinal compounds, and the implant can be naturally broken down by the body over time."

Weisman believes that one of great advantages of the new technology will be its ability to tailor the contents of a drug for particular needs. This could mean a dose of antibiotics could be made stronger or weaker, depending on the requirements of the patient. It would also mean hospitals or pharmacies would not have to wait for deliveries from pharmaceutical companies. As long as they have the drug in question, they can create the dosage in the medical facility, or drug store.

"One of the greatest benefits of this technology is that it can be done using any consumer printer and can be used anywhere in the world," Weisman said.

continued http://rt.com/usa/182120-3d-printer-drugs-science/

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It may not be long off that computers will also be capable of complex chemistry.. then we just load them up with some basic elements and they create whatever substance we want.
 

MyDoorsAreOpen

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Brave new world indeed. This technology, once perfected and cheapened and trickled down to the masses, will revolutionize a whole lot of industries and many of the basic ways we live our lives, not only in medicine. But just like the explosion of the Internet and personal computing in the mid to late 90s made anyone capable of being a published writer, recording artist, graphic designer, grassroots activist, or filmmaker, I think making everyone capable of being a chemical engineer will be something of a mixed blessing. There'll be a lot more ways ordinary people can empower themselves, but also a lot more ways they can disempower others, and themselves, that we're too busy dreaming about the glittering world of tomorrow to foresee. There'll be a lot more signals, from a lot more talented minds that would have before had no voice. But that'll mean fiercer competition to get your voice heard, both for newcomers and old established players alike. And a lot. LOT. more noise to make your voice heard above!
 

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It's important to read the article, because the headline is probably misleading. This is about printing dosage forms (capsules and such), not the actual bioactive molecules.
 

panic_the_digital

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^Yeah. Cool sounding article, until you get to the meat where they say it is just for making capsules. BTW, what an idiotic use of a 3-D printer.
 

panic_the_digital

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^It seems like we are thinking too much in terms of hypotheticals. It is hard enough to do the necessary research to determine appropriate drug dosing for large groups of people, let alone one's ideal individual dose. If something like this were to ever get off the ground, there would need to be dirt cheap genomic testing for CYP enzymes, constant renal functioning tests...the list goes on. Now implantable drug matrices, those sound promising. There is some pretty stupid bullshit in there. For instance:

"It would also mean hospitals or pharmacies would not have to wait for deliveries from pharmaceutical companies. As long as they have the drug in question, they can create the dosage in the medical facility, or drug store."

WTF??? This is different from compounding how, or what am I reading exactly? If I don't have the drug in question, guess what? I'll be waiting for my drug order (a whole day, big whoop). This article is so poorly conceived and written, I am having a hard time taking the good in it seriously. I wonder what kind of med school drop outs are allowed to become science writers sometimes.
 

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This is different from compounding how, or what am I reading exactly? If I don't have the drug in question, guess what? I'll be waiting for my drug order (a whole day, big whoop).

The way I see it, it's the difference between a laser printer and a scribe. I'm not a compounding pharmacist though, so maybe I'm missing something.
 

panic_the_digital

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Also, if I am interpreting the dumb quote I pulled from the article correctly, they are suggesting that pharmacies could "compound" a dosage form on demand of a product that already exists. This is illegal as hell, and a quick way to lose one's license.
 

oldirtybizza

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Seem like a good option for small scale smuggling, embedding drugs within polymers and then printing drug infused objects.
 

pmoseman

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dalpat077

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Seems today is my day for calling back the past and bumping old threads that I read over a year ago!

Ironically and not long after the last post here (2014) the first 3D printed drug received FDA approval (2015).



And moving closer to the present day (2020).



 
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