Bluelight

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 37 of 37
  1. Collapse Details
     
    #26
    Moderator
    Psychedelic Medicine
    mr peabody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Frostbite Falls, MN
    Posts
    1,271



    Iboga therapy for nicotine addiction

    Joseph Mahfouz

    Every GP in Britain will know patients, friends, or even family who want to stop smoking but find it impossible to do so due to being addicted to tobacco. Although hypnotherapy can be very useful in treating tobacco addiction, it only addresses the psychological aspect of the addiction – not the physiological addiction that keeps so many nicotine users addicted years after they make up their minds to stop.

    A little-known traditional medicine that interrupts dependence on nicotine and alleviates cravings by stopping withdrawal symptoms is found in the botanical kingdom. This medicine acts to interrupt nicotine addiction without noticeable psychological or physical effects – allowing tobacco addicts a window of freedom from physiological dependence. With a little willpower they can then overcome their addiction completely and stop smoking permanently. This medicine, from a west African tree called Iboga, has been a central part of spirituality for the people of western Central Africa for millennia. The medicinal active constituents derived from the root of this tree are several alkaloids, predominantly ibogaine.

    Since the discovery of Ibogaine by Howard Lotsof – who found it to be a chemical dependence interrupter and the most effective treatment for opiate addiction in 1962, extensive peer-reviewed clinical and academic research has been done on ibogaine, underwriting the efficacy of its practical application in addiction therapy. Independent Iboga treatment clinics have been established in Canada, the Netherlands, Mexico, South Africa and New Zealand, while underground iboga therapy is occasionally found elsewhere. However, due primarily to emphasis on treating addiction to heroin and cocaine, its ability to effectively interrupt nicotine addiction and craving at sub-threshold dosages is still virtually unheard of.





    Dependence is defined as “how difficult it is for the user to quit, the relapse rate, the % of people who become dependent, the rating users give their need for the substance, and the degree to which the substance is used in the face of evidence that it causes harm.” According to this definition, nicotine has a higher danger of dependence than alcohol, cocaine or heroin. The Royal College of Physicians’ 2000 report on nicotine addiction concludes that: “Cigarettes are highly efficient nicotine delivery devices, as addictive as heroin or cocaine.” Furthermore, the addition of additives to artificially increase addiction is a standard practice in the tobacco industry.

    2/3 of smokers start before age 18. In 2014, just over a half reported that they had tried to give up smoking. Of those who have tried smoking tobacco, 1/3 to 1/2 will become addicted. 60% of smokers say they would find it difficult to go a single day without smoking and 70% have their first cigarette within an hour of waking.

    Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) research has shown that the total cost to society of tobacco-related harm in England alone is approximately GBP 13.9 billion per year. In 2014-15 the UK Government received CBP 9.5 billion in revenue from tax on tobacco. In 2012-13 the Government spent GBP 87.7 million on services to help people stop smoking and GBP 58.1 million on medication to help people stop smoking.

    So the often-repeated slogan that tobacco users contribute more in taxation than the financial cost of tobacco use to society is a “convenient” myth. A 50-year study has shown that 1/2 to 2/3 of lifelong cigarette smokers will be eventually killed by their habit. Every year +/- 96,000 people in the UK die from diseases directly caused by smoking tobacco.





    Iboga's psychoactive effects are completely absent at the low dosages necessary to inhibit nicotine addiction. Iboga is not considered a recreational drug, and it has no potential for recreational use or abuse. Confirmed anecdotal reports indicate that around one gram of dried Iboga rootbark material when eaten effectively stops nicotine craving and interrupts the physiological addiction of tobacco for approximately 12 hours, with no other noticeable effects. If repeated for a few consecutive days – around a week – the physical withdrawal and associated craving for nicotine will be completely absent during this time. The absence of nicotine from the bloodstream then allows the tobacco addiction to be vanquished.

    https://dogta137.files.wordpress.com/2016/11/iboga.pdf
    Last edited by mr peabody; 30-09-2018 at 05:34.
    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
     
    #27
    Moderator
    Psychedelic Medicine
    mr peabody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Frostbite Falls, MN
    Posts
    1,271
    CBD found to reduce cigarette consumption

    Morgan CJ, Das RK, Joye A, Curran HV, Kamboj SK

    The role of the endocannabinoid system in nicotine addiction is being increasingly acknowledged. This randomised double blind placebo controlled study set out to assess the impact of the ad-hoc use of cannabidiol (CBD) in smokers who wished to stop smoking. 24 smokers were randomised to receive an inhaler of CBD or placebo for one week, they were instructed to use the inhaler when they felt the urge to smoke. Over the treatment week, placebo treated smokers showed no differences in number of cigarettes smoked. In contrast, those treated with CBD significantly reduced the number of cigarettes smoked by ~40% during treatment. Results also indicated some maintenance of this effect at follow-up. These preliminary data, combined with the strong preclinical rationale for use of this compound, suggest CBD to be a potential treatment for nicotine addiction that warrants further exploration.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23685330

    -----

    Could "magic mushrooms" help you stop smoking?

    A new study examined whether psilocybin could help long-time smokers put down their butts for good.

    Once dismissed as a remnant of '60s counterculture, and eventually banned as a Schedule I drug, psilocybin—the naturally-occurring psychedelic compound found in certain species of mushrooms, thus earning them the sobriquet "magic mushrooms"—has in recent years been ushered to the forefront of medical and psychological research for its reported efficacy in treating any number of health conditions, including depression and alcoholism.

    Now, a new study suggests that psilocybin may also help to curb smoking, as evidenced by the results of six years of research involving smokers who had tried and failed to quit smoking on multiple occasions.

    The study found that through controlled psilocybin use and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), more than half of the participants had successfully quit smoking after a six-month period—a higher rate of abstinence than with CBT alone, according to researchers.

    The study, conducted by researchers from Johns Hopkins University, involved 15 study participants—10 men and 5 women, all at an average age of 51, and who smoked, on average, slightly less than a full pack (19 cigarettes) daily for 31 years. All had attempted to stop smoking on previous occasions, but had failed.

    The study authors administered treatment to the participants and then followed up with them over a period of six years, between 2009 and 2015.

    The treatment consisted of carefully controlled and monitored psilocybin use in conjunction with CBT. After a period of more than two years, the researchers invited the participants to take part in a follow-up interview to determine if and how the treatment affected their smoking. Twelve of the original 15 participants took part in the interview.

    What researchers found was that the 12 participants had not only succeeded in complete smoking cessation after six months, but also experienced a host of additional emotional and psychological responses to the treatment.

    Participants said that through a combination of the treatment, counseling, a "strong rapport" with the study team, and a sense of momentum after taking part in the study all contributed to their achieving abstinence.

    They also reported "gaining vivid insights into self-identity and reasons for smoking" from the psilocybin treatment, and the sense of "interconnectedness, curiosity and awe" continued after the treatment had ended. Participants also said that they felt an array of "persistent" positive feelings, including "increased aesthetic appreciation, altruism, and pro-social behavior" as a result of their participation.

    The researchers concluded that the results of their study underscored the value in continuing research into what some have labeled "psychedelic therapy," and recommended future research trials.

    Their findings also supported previous study findings by Johns Hopkins researchers, which suggested that lifetime smokers treated with psilocybin experienced twice the rate of abstinence than those who used the FDA-approved drug Chantix.

    https://www.thefix.com/could-magic-m...u-stop-smoking
    Last edited by mr peabody; 02-12-2018 at 14:23.
    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
     
    #28
    Moderator
    Psychedelic Medicine
    mr peabody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Frostbite Falls, MN
    Posts
    1,271



    Iboga and nicotine


    Iboga will help but it will not stop smoking for you. It will however switch off the cravings and give you a chance. It will tell the nicotine to shut the hell up for a little while.

    However you will always have to consider YOUR want for nicotine - not just nicotine's desire to remain within you. It takes 2 to tango. If you fill all the gaps in your life which you normally substitute with tobacco then it's much easier to quit.

    The most important thing is giving yourself permission to take a break. People go out for smoke breaks all the time and nobody bats an eyelid. But 90% of the time they do it to move away from stress, rest for a bit, then move back, under the auspices of having a smoke. So give yourself permission to relax anyway, without a crutch.

    Also, switch to additive free rolling tobacco (e.g. American Spirit) so you can eliminate the addiction to the additives in cigarettes.

    Find the original trigger point of your nicotine craving. It originates at the amygdala. It will feel like this really silent pulse; this pulse activates a cascade of things and then you start getting the feeling of really needing a smoke. It can be as long as 0.25 seconds between that pulse and the emotional response although usually it is nearly instantaneous.

    That silent pulse is the killswitch to the addiction. Switch this off (it's VERY easy) and the addiction will disappear like it was never there, zero withdrawals. The Allen Carr method teaches you how to sense this and observe it clearly, which is why it works. It didn't work for you because your perception of the book did not lead you to isolating that pulse.

    Once you do see and behold with clarity this amygdala spark, the addiction is nothing. Deciding not to trigger this pulse is no different to wiggling your finger.

    So to summarise, this is what you will feel:

    [smoking-related cue OR ~1hr since last cig] => (silent amygdala pulse) => blood flow change => emotions change => voice in mind says "I need a cigarette"

    The whole process happens very fast but every craving has a beginning, so it's easy to find. Also you must eliminate all smoking related cues for around 2 weeks: do not hang around smokers, or drinkers for that while, do not try to smell smoke or see a lit or unlit cigarette. Do not write yourself a check that your willpower can not and will not cash.

    This reduces the fight down to a single repeating cue: the one you get each time nicotine levels in your body drop to a threshold where they no longer satisfy and consequently the amygdala signals it's time for a smoke.

    -embracethevoid

    -----

    Quitting cigarettes may be harder than quitting heroin


    By Candy Lashkari

    It may be tougher to quit smoking cigarettes compared to beating a heroin addiction. An Australian study found that many long term smokers have tried to quit 7.4 times but are still unable to do so. Sydney GP Raymond Seidler actually feels that people do not realize that quitting smoking is just as bad as kicking heroin out of your life.

    "What smokers don't realise is that nicotine addiction is as, or even more powerful, than heroin addiction," he said. "The brain's receptors for smoking are as strongly attached to nicotine as the heroine receptor is to opiates. That can come as a shock to a lot of people. Quitting is therefore a serious challenge for most." said Dr Seidler.

    A recent survey commissioned by Pfizer Australia had responses from over 2,000 smokers which revealed that smokers are much more likely to find chores to do rather than approach a health care professional to help them kick the butt. Amongst the respondents 35% would rather clean the house, 27% would rather pay the bills, 22% would rather go
    to work on the weekend and 18% would rather go to dinner with the in-laws to avoid visiting a health care professional.

    "We need to study why people are reluctant to go to a professional to get help, because we know that GPs and pharmacists have an important role to play in supporting patients who want to quit smoking," said Dr Seidler.

    In the survey, 28% were unsure of how the health care professional could help them quit smoking cigarettes. The smokers in New South Wales were the least likely to seek help from experts. 75% of all the respondents had made at least 2 attempts at quitting and been unsuccessful. According to Dr Seidler if more people approached experts they would be able to give up smoking with a greater success rate.

    "The benefits to smokers of seeking professional help perhaps need to be more carefully and persuasively explained." said Dr Seidler.

    In the survey 27% did not want to spend the money on professional help while 17% were worried about being judged. 16% were unable to admit that they have tried to quit and failed, while 12% say that they do have the time to seek professional help. Amongst the respondents 6% even said that their own doctors were unaware that they smoked.
    Last edited by mr peabody; 29-01-2019 at 08:14.
    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
     
    #29
    Moderator
    Psychedelic Medicine
    mr peabody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Frostbite Falls, MN
    Posts
    1,271



    Researchers report that a small number of longtime smokers who had failed many attempts to drop the habit did so after a carefully controlled and monitored use of psilocybin in the context of a cognitive behavioral therapy treatment program. The abstinence rate for study participants was 80 percent after 6 months, a quit rate simply unprecedented in smoking cessation research. A follow-up study from the same group found that 16 months after the therapy, 60% of the participants were still abstinent.

    http://howtousepsychedelics.org/quit-smoking/

    -----

    I was a smoker addicted to nicotine for 37 years. 10 years ago, I planned a quiet but powerful magic mushroom trip that changed my life. I potentiated the psilocybin dosage with a MAO-inhibitor in the form of a Syrian Rue seed extract, which intensifies the dosage and deepens the journey. The experience allowed me to see my life (and all life) in transcendent overview. And to quite vividly be reborn into this life with the realization that no, I was not born a smoker.

    I quit in my mind in that present moment. And while it was emotionally tough over the next few months - I never looked back except to thank the mushrooms that made my liberation possible. Clearly, they hold fantastic potential to help others with addictions, depression etc. or simply as a profound way to reset the compass of our lives.

    https://hub.jhu.edu/2014/09/11/magic-mushrooms-smoking/

    -----

    Just talked to a friend who underwent Ibogaine treatment in Mexico. He did this because of heroin and cocaine use. His results were miraculous. Besides quitting heroin and cocaine, he ended a 25 yr smoking habit overnight. He said the trip was intense, comparable to 5-15 hits of the most powerful LSD. But different. He mentioned touching the eternal, but was really unable to describe. I am on suboxone and thinking about taking treatment myself. It sounds incredible.

    -blahmfingblah

    -----

    I asked a friend who works with ibogaine in Mexico his recommended dose for smoking cessation - keep in mind we are both about 60kg, he said "120mg" no hesitation, so about 2mg/kg.
    I went home, weighed it out, looked at it skeptically, was hesitant and then took it. An hour later I could feel it washing over me, soothing away all the nicotine jitters. I am sitting here now 17 hours tobacco free with no anxiety at all. I'll be continuing the 120mg a day until I run out, which is to say today I am absolutely shocked at how well this has worked.

    -cdin
    Last edited by mr peabody; 10-11-2018 at 04:42.
    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
     
    #30
    Moderator
    Psychedelic Medicine
    mr peabody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Frostbite Falls, MN
    Posts
    1,271
    Iboga TA for cigarette addiction

    I had my trip on Thursday morning. I was scared to indulge in the iboga after my last relapse. Things just weren't the same, I was simply terrified. But I had to do it. I needed to quit cigarettes and get rid of my drug cravings that had resurfaced.

    I had tried to quit the cigarettes on my own, but I wasn't even able to go a full 24 hours without them. It was extremely difficult for me. I have heard that every time you start smoking cigarettes again it gets harder to quit than the last time. I had never really believed that until now.

    So here I was, finding quitting extremely difficult, kicking myself in the ass for my relapse and feeling quite literally lost. Everything had fallen apart. And the best I could do was literally pretend to myself and to everyone around me that everything was okay, when in fact... it wasn't, at all. I felt like I was never going to get out of the mess that I had created for myself! I had lost all faith in myself and the entire universe around me!

    I had my last smoke Wednesday night and decided to go to bed, even though I had been taking short naps all day to forget my miserable existence. I awoke Thursday morning bright and early to a crystal meth dream. How could this be? I had only relapsed on crystal meth for 2 days prior to this event! I had a solid half year from the actual stuff beforehand... How could 2 days bring on such a strong surreal dream of the stuff!? "What am I supposed to do now" I thought to myself.

    That was enough for me, I told myself at that point that it was now or never. So in I went to my drawer with the iboga TA extract. I had the iboga weighed and capsuled out beforehand and was all prepared. Even though it was literally 5am and the house was sound asleep, I felt ready and clearly, I was. I ingested a Gravol to help with the nausea 30 minutes prior to ingesting the iboga TA, and then I ingested the 5 iboga TA capsules (1.5 grams in total).

    No turning back now.

    An hour after ingesting the capsules it began. The Gravol seemed to be working okay for the nausea, as my last trip was without Gravol and by the hour mark I would be puking my guts out! Like hardcore. I should also note that I had a heart and blood pressure monitor right beside me for the entire trip in case anything was off, but everything went smoothly.

    There were lots of visions during my experience, but I find iboga's visions to be very gentle and subtle. They're not as much in your face like a mushroom or LSD trip. The actual message itself is the gold (I don't do it for the visions). If you're looking for a visual trip, look elsewhere. Ayahuasca perhaps.

    I was told so many insightful, truthful and loving things by the spirit of iboga. It is a very powerful tool for our recovery, and an even stronger entity like being. More powerful than anyone can actually put into words (it is something one has to actually experience themselves to fully grasp. I had a pen and paper right beside me for anything important that came up, as I didn't want to take the chance at forgetting anything meaningful (and I still have my iboga notes today and will always keep them close to heart).

    No way Jose. This was it, my last chance and my new beginning. And God damn, that is literally exactly what it was. I'm so happy I chose to do the iboga TA and really give it another chance. When used properly and safely it is literally the most helpful thing out there. I have gone to meetings, rehabs, a halfway house, jails & institutions. Iboga without a doubt is it. A gift from the actual God himself without a single doubt in my mind now.

    It's incredible. Not only has the substance eliminated my cravings and desires for drugs. Not only has it showed me literally a whole new way of living. It's even given me my actual faith back. And I mean like actual. I have a religion again. I believe in a real God. A "higher power". A universal love. Whatever the hell you wanna call it. I believe. I've literally been shown the true power, and that's nothing anyone can take away from me. It's just incredible really. I'm so happy again.

    I was just literally shown soooo much, and in such a short period too!!! Just nutz. It really is like doing 10 years of therapy in one night. I also love the comparison I've heard other people make when they say it's like defragmenting your brain. And it is. Cleaning out the cob webs. Going back to a simple time. Renewing yourself. Going back to your youth!

    Some other words I've heard used towards Iboga are; "the cure", "a reset", etc.. and I would agree. But it's not just like you take it and that's it. I had to do my proper research. I had to know what I was getting into. I had read that iboga can be used as a catalyst to quit smoking cigarettes, and that's what I decided to use it for (referring to the actual cigarette addiction).

    I've gotten myself back, and to me, that's more than I could have asked for. It was literally worth all the puking. Iboga is not an easy substance to go through that's for sure. As I have heard one of my mentors speak about in one of his documentaries say, "it's the hard way to pray". Going to Church and praying is easy. (I still go to Church once a week too actually, no joke).

    Anyways yeah, it's sweet. It's helped me in so many ways. It explained to me the dangers of the substances that I was using in depth, and showed me my truest heart. It separated me from my addiction, and that seems to be how it was actually able to do that without the addiction getting in my way for a change.

    Because it was an inner spirit that seemed to be connected to me somehow, I was able to believe in it and still do to this day (multiple days after the experience). And even better, because I am not on Benzodiazepines anymore, I will literally remember and cherish my whole experience for a change, so that's nice too lol.

    It wasn't like some random stranger preaching at me or bitching at a meeting. It was something bigger. So much bigger. It was real. More down to earth than anything really out there. Actually understandable I guess you could say.

    The iboga spirit literally healed me! The substance itself literally does have way more potential than a lot of people out there give it that's for sure! There's nothing out there that compares in benefit for the human race. It is truly that actual "it". And I actually believe that now that I've lived it myself.

    Since then I haven't had a single cigarette. I literally quit overnight like it was nothing. I was surprised at how easy and willing I actually became. Even as I write this now, I haven't had a cigarette going on 5 days now thanks to the Iboga and I literally feel great! And my actual cravings to drugs and substances has vanished completely. I'm not haunted with thoughts or dreams about using crystal meth anymore. I was shown the bads of that substance overnight and given a lesson I'll never forget. I've gotten myself back.

    I had a hole in my heart from the substances that I was using and now that hole just isn't there anymore. I'm back to me. I can do whatever I want again and feel happy and know that I'm no longer a slave to evil.

    The only thing I will note is I found that even though I had only taken 50mgs of Gravol beforehand, I still found the Gravol to put a groggy feeling on me during the beginning of the experience and this I would rather go without. Even though it did help me puke a lot less (as my last experience I was literally puking and shitting at the exact same time while tripping major ball sack); I'd literally rather that than the groggy feeling as it dampens the experience in my opinion (in the beginning anyways).

    Another thing I had realized after going into the experience (that I want to make note of here) is that my last relapse with the substances had actually overridden me and caused me to hate iboga for some reason. I don't mean hate hate, what I mean is, yeah they simply override things. It was as if I had forgotten everything I was shown the last trip and had now succumb to the sin that the substances had been creating (even though deep down I knew it was all wrong).

    And like I said, I was scared as hell to go back into the iboga, but I knew something had to be done!!!! And I'm sure as hell glad I did now.

    My love for iboga is back and so is my love for my life. An A+++ experience.

    http://www.bluelight.org/vb/threads/...stimonial-2018



    Last edited by mr peabody; 23-11-2018 at 11:39.
    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
     
    #31
    Moderator
    Psychedelic Medicine
    mr peabody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Frostbite Falls, MN
    Posts
    1,271
    Originally Posted by vortech
    I noticed psychedelics and dissociatives make one realize the stark reality of a chemical lie, one that does not benefit the body in any amount. First time after tripping on mushrooms I threw away the cigarettes I had without a second thought and managed to stay off them for awhile. A couple weeks ago after an LSD trip I smoked my first cigarette since before the trip and felt the negative effects on the body super clearly. For the last 10 years I have limited myself to 3-4 cigarettes a day with periods of abstinence. I attribute psychedelics and dissociatives for keeping my use of tobacco in check. It seems fitting that the 'dark' physically addicting drugs are the ones that encourage smoking, and the non psychically-addicting drugs discourage.

    -----

    Originally Posted by mr peabody
    Great comment. Psychedelics seem to have an intrinsic power to expose lies. That may well be their most important attribute... to reveal truth in the face of deception.

    -----

    Originally Posted by tokezu
    ^Yes, absolutely! I had a trip on 2C-E once where I realized that I didn't really like smoking anymore and hadn't liked it for quite some time, but somehow I had managed to keep that feeling totally hidden from myself. And as every procrastinator knows, the only way to make sure you can't fail is not to try at all, right? Not really what I had in mind for that trip, just wanted to have some fun not some revelation like that, but that's how it goes sometimes, right? I didn't stop right after that either, but after the trip I just couldn't shake the thought anymore and became more and more aware that even that glorified cigarette with the morning coffee or after a good meal wasn't really that good anymore. When I finally quit months later, it was the easiest thing I ever did. Over three years now and I haven't missed it for a second.
    Last edited by mr peabody; 02-12-2018 at 14:22.
    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
     
    #32
    Moderator
    Psychedelic Medicine
    mr peabody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Frostbite Falls, MN
    Posts
    1,271
    Psychedelics could hold the key to helping nicotine-addicted people quit smoking

    For cigarette smokers, quitting can be an incredibly challenging experience. Approximately 480,000 Americans die every year from cigarettes, making it the single largest preventable cause of disease and death in the country. If that's not enough to convince smokers to quit, it's evidence enough of the power of nicotine addiction. So when Johns Hopkins University came out with a study on the effects of using psilocybin in helping longtime smokers kick the habit, the results impressed many.

    In a carefully controlled setting, smokers were introduced to magic mushrooms three times over the course of two months, upping the dose of psilocybin each time. The study, which
    was published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, showed a smoking abstinence rate of 80 percent after six months. Compare that to the 35 percent success rate for varenicline, a prescription drug that is considered one of the most effective addiction treatment options for smokers, after six months, and it's easy to understand why this study provoked such excitement.

    Nicotine replacement and other behavioral therapies have success rates of less than 30 percent, according to the researchers.

    The average age of the study participants was 55, and they smoked an average of 19 cigarettes per day for 31 years. All had repeatedly tried and failed to quit; and while some had experimented with psychedelics in the past (on average, 27 years before participating in the study), none had thought to use magic mushrooms to treat their nicotine addiction. But researchers are increasingly finding that psilocybin may have unexplored health benefits that could be applied in the context of cognitive behavioral therapy treatment programs.

    For example, psilocybin has also proven to be effective at treating depression, anxiety, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), as CNN reported.

    Researchers emphasize that these results are not meant to encourage smokers to perform do-it-yourself, magic mushroom therapy sessions for smoking cessation. Rather, the success of this clinic trial appears to demonstrate that, in controlled settings overseen by medical professionals, longtime smokers who are administered psilocybin pills can be effectively coaxed out of their addiction through behavioral therapy.

    "Quitting smoking isn't a simple biological reaction to psilocybin, as with other medications that directly affect nicotine receptors," Dr. Matthew Johnson, the study's lead author and an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, wrote. "When administered after careful preparation and in a therapeutic context, psilocybin can lead to deep reflection about one's life and spark motivation to change."

    Johnson plans to pursue further research into the use of psilocybin to treat smoking addiction, comparing the results to the success of using nicotine patches, and the researchers will "use MRI scans to study brain activity in participants."

    https://www.attn.com/stories/3773/mu...itting-smoking


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
     
    #33
    Moderator
    Psychedelic Medicine
    mr peabody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Frostbite Falls, MN
    Posts
    1,271
    CBD reverses attentional bias to cigarette cues in a human experimental model of tobacco withdrawal

    Hindocha, Freeman, Grabski, Stroud, Crudgington, Davies, Das, Lawn, Morgan and Curran

    Cannabidiol (CBD), a non‐intoxicating cannabinoid found in cannabis, may be a promising novel smoking cessation treatment due to its anxiolytic properties, minimal side effects and research showing that it may modify drug cue salience. We used an experimental medicine approach with dependent cigarette smokers to investigate if (1) overnight nicotine abstinence, compared with satiety, will produce greater attentional bias (AB), higher pleasantness ratings of cigarette‐related stimuli and increased craving and withdrawal; and (2) CBD in comparison to placebo, would attenuate AB, pleasantness of cigarette‐related stimuli, craving and withdrawal and not produce any side effects.

    This is the first study to investigate effects of CBD on nicotine withdrawal. After overnight tobacco abstinence, cigarette smokers administered 800 mg CBD, in comparison to placebo, show a reduced salience and pleasantness of cigarette cues, in the absence of any reductions in withdrawal or craving. This study highlights the potential utility of CBD as a treatment for specific neurocognitive components of tobacco use disorder, and suggests that one potential mechanism by which CBD may exert its effects on addiction is via a reduction in the salience of drug cues. These results support the growing literature regarding CBD in the treatment of addictive disorders.

    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/...1111/add.14243

    -----

    CBD reduces cigarette consumption in tobacco smokers

    Morgan CJ, Das RK, Joye A, Curran HV, Kamboj SK

    The role of the endocannabinoid system in nicotine addiction is being increasingly acknowledged. We conducted a pilot, randomised double blind placebo controlled study set out to assess the impact of the ad-hoc use of cannabidiol (CBD) in smokers who wished to stop smoking. 24 smokers were randomised to receive an inhaler of CBD (n=12) or placebo (n=12) for one week, they were instructed to use the inhaler when they felt the urge to smoke. Over the treatment week, placebo treated smokers showed no differences in number of cigarettes smoked. In contrast, those treated with CBD significantly reduced the number of cigarettes smoked by ~40% during treatment. Results also indicated some maintenance of this effect at follow-up. These preliminary data, combined with the strong preclinical rationale for use of this compound, suggest CBD to be a potential treatment for nicotine addiction that warrants further exploration.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23685330
    Last edited by mr peabody; 09-12-2018 at 14:34.
    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
     
    #34
    Moderator
    Psychedelic Medicine
    mr peabody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Frostbite Falls, MN
    Posts
    1,271

    Cambridge


    Psilocybin gave me the desire to quit smoking


    I always knew I shouldn't smoke, but everyday pressures override common sense. Psilocybin allowed me to view my life with a fresh perspective and 'reset' some of the harmful aspects
    of my lifestyle. That new insight made me want to change. So I made some drastic changes, and I continue to reap the benefits of my experiences to this day, and I feel I have deeper understanding of myself, others, and the world around me.

    I didn't use any other Tobacco replacement therapy or treatment, nor did I feel I needed it. The mushroom trip was the catalyst, and cannabis eased my withdrawal symptoms from the nicotine. I quit first try, and have no desire to start again. I no longer live with the nagging craving for Tobacco, which controlled my mood and how I went about my day.

    The impact on me was so profound, it's almost unbelievable. I only wish everybody had access to such treatment. Nicotine patches and e-cigarettes are great for stopping the physical
    act of lighting a cigarette, but you are still dependent. You need to want to break the physical dependence, or your lifestyle will never change. Psychedelics can instigate that desire.

    After a mushroom trip, smoking tobacco and getting drunk seemed like the most pointless activities. They offer no real benefit, they only dull the senses. Psychedelics heighten them.

    -strongtothefinish

    -----

    Psychedelics have an amazing capacity to forge new neural paths very quickly. I was a pack a day smoker for 3 years, took LSD, assessed the addiction, realized it made me feel shitty
    and that I didn't even like the feeling of nicotine. Quit the next day and haven't looked back.

    -phat_connall

    -----

    I took 0.25 grams of psilocybin every 3 days for 2 months with no negative side effects. I am now 3 months free of nicotine and still have no urge to smoke even around heavy smokers.

    -squidster42

    -----

    For decades research on ibogaine has been stymied by its classification as a Schedule I drug, yet the results of animal studies are intriguing. A study from 2015 found that noribogaine, the substance that ibogaine breaks down to when ingested, reduced self-administration of nicotine in addicted rats by 64%. The mechanism of action at the molecular level is peculiar, wholly unlike that of traditional drugs. Most active compounds work by binding to a receptor on the outside of a cell membrane. But ibogaine seems to do the opposite, binding to the inside of the membrane, something no other naturally occurring molecule is known to do.

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...-psychedelics/

    -----

    Psilocybin provides a whole new perspective to view your life from. It can be a kind of apotheosis that lasts for months beyond the actual trip. I took mushrooms ten years ago to quit cigarettes and was completely successful in the attempt – that’s a powerful reason to give this a chance.

    -Tony Spencer
    Last edited by mr peabody; 27-12-2018 at 10:44.
    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
     
    #35
    Moderator
    Psychedelic Medicine
    mr peabody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Frostbite Falls, MN
    Posts
    1,271



    2C-E "an incredible tool" for arresting cigarette addiction


    My girlfriend, J, and I acquired six grams of 2C-E HCl powder from an online vendor, and had four amazingly powerful 2C-E trips in a month. I was a smoker prior to this for 6 years. I'd been trying to quit on an off with all attempts failing miserably for about 2 years prior to this experience; I didn't like being a smoker, and I felt seriously addicted to nicotine. It was a filthy habit, but quitting didn't seem like an option, as I was working a shitty kitchen job and living with people who drank and smoked.

    I can't recall exactly the chronology of my quitting and 2C-E use, but it was something like this. I remember smoking on my first 2C-E trip, and still feeling like I "enjoyed" my cigarette, but I was thinking an awful lot about the sheer stupidity of it. I also engaged in this type of thinking when sober, but it was different somehow on 2C-E. The 2nd and 3rd time I tripped
    on 2C-E, I think I may have had 1 cigarette. However, these times the cigarette's dry acrid smoke was especially potent to my heightened senses, and I had taken larger doses of 2C-E, and my mind was working much faster and was way further outside the box so to speak.

    I'm having difficulty describing how I felt 2C-E was important in helping me stop my addiction to nicotine. It wasn't like 2C-E helped any physical symptoms. What helped me to quit was the positive mental reinforcement I gained from 2C-E. The reinforcement manifested in several ways during the trip, such as realizing the emotional impact of needing a cigarette in order to feel satisfied, crazy psychedelic imaginings and mental imagery of the damage I was doing to myself when I smoked. Although this was not unpleasant, it was like "well if you?re going to put formaldehyde and tar in there, then this is what you might look like in 40 years!"

    The fourth trip I remember not smoking a single cigarette, and all my cravings felt very manageable mentally. It felt as through 2C-E helped me find the strength to remind myself why I don't want to be a smoker any longer, EVERY time I felt a craving arise. It was like I thought about my addiction on 2C-E so intense, that I could never again pretend to ignore the fact that it really bothers me to be a smoker. I used a nicotine patch for a short time immediately after I quit smoking, but I didn't use it for anywhere near as long as directed (10 weeks). And after I stopped using the patch, no symptoms returned, and still 4.5 months later, no relapse.

    As a side note, J was never a smoker, and did not like me being a smoker. So although I say 2C-E helped me quit smoking, I also wanted to quit prior to using 2C-E. But I felt as thought 2C-E helped me quit in a very unexpected way. Quitting smoking was never an issue I wanted to tackle by using psychedelics, it was just a bonus this incredible teacher gave me. The best thing about 2C-E is that all the changes it brings about feel as if they come from the heart. It was very natural feeling, despite the synthetic nature of the drug.

    https://erowid.org/experiences/exp.php?ID=70931
    Last edited by mr peabody; 10-01-2019 at 23:46.
    Reply With Quote
     

  11. Collapse Details
     
    #36
    Moderator
    Psychedelic Medicine
    mr peabody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Frostbite Falls, MN
    Posts
    1,271



    Psilocybin-occasioned mystical experiences in the treatment of tobacco addiction


    Albert Garcia-Romeu, PhD, Roland R. Griffiths, PhD, Matthew W. Johnson, PhD1

    Psilocybin-occasioned mystical experiences have been linked to persisting effects in healthy volunteers including positive changes in behavior, attitudes, values, and increases in the personality domain of openness. In an open-label pilot-study of psilocybin-facilitated smoking addiction treatment, 15 smokers received 2 or 3 doses of psilocybin in the context of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for smoking cessation. Twelve of 15 participants demonstrated biologically verified smoking abstinence at 6-month follow-up. Participants who were abstinent at 6 months were compared to participants still smoking at 6 months on measures of subjective effects of psilocybin. Abstainers scored significantly higher on a measure of psilocybin-occasioned mystical experience. No significant differences in general intensity of drug effects were found between groups, suggesting that mystical-type subjective effects, rather than overall intensity of drug effects, were responsible for smoking cessation. Nine of 15 participants met criteria for “complete” mystical experience. Smoking cessation outcomes were significantly correlated with measures of mystical experience on session days, as well as retrospective ratings of personal meaning and spiritual significance of psilocybin sessions. These results suggest a mediating role of mystical experience in psychedelic-facilitated addiction treatment.

    The association between psilocybin-occasioned mystical experience and higher order psychological constructs relevant across addictions (e.g. craving, temptation, self-efficacy), is consistent with prior research showing efficacy of psychedelics for treatment of alcoholism and opioid dependence. Perhaps the most exciting implication is that this drug class could be used to treat a wide variety of drug addictions, including smoking, alcoholism, and opioid dependence, as well as non-drug addictions (e.g. gambling addiction). Given the relatively low success rates of current addiction treatments, and the global morbidity and mortality associated with addictive disorders, further research into psychedelic-facilitated treatment of addiction is both timely and important.

    The idea that a single discrete experience can result in lasting beneficial effects in an individual’s attitudes or behavior is highly unusual if not unprecedented within the modern biomedical paradigm, wherein curative or therapeutic processes are often conceptualized as occurring gradually. Yet there does exist a parallel phenomenon that seems to function similarly, though in the opposite direction; that is, a salient adverse event (i.e. trauma) may result in lasting negative effects in a person’s physical and mental life. The acquired nature of PTSD and the observation that acute adverse events are capable of producing enduring detrimental brain changes are well-documented. It is our contention that in a similar fashion, the psychedelic-occasioned peak experience may function as a salient, discrete event producing inverse PTSD-like effects-that is, persisting changes in behavior (and presumably the brain) associated with lasting benefit. By “PTSD-like” we are not presuming that these experiences necessarily share common biological mechanisms with PTSD. Rather, we are proposing that these experiences are “PTSD-like” in the sense that a single discrete event can cause lasting behavioral (and likely biological) changes, and “inverse” in the sense that these lasting changes are beneficial in nature, as opposed to deleterious. We hope that this conceptualization may prompt further research into this potentially important class of experiences.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4342293/
    Last edited by mr peabody; 28-01-2019 at 22:14.
    Reply With Quote
     

  12. Collapse Details
     
    #37
    Moderator
    Psychedelic Medicine
    mr peabody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Frostbite Falls, MN
    Posts
    1,271



    Longtime smokers kick the habit with help from magic mushrooms


    Johns Hopkins researchers report that a small number of longtime smokers who had failed numerous attempts to kick the habit have successfully quit smoking with the aid of psilocybin.

    The abstinence rate for study was 80%, with 12 of the 15 participants remaining smoke free after six months, a rate much higher than typical in smoking cessation trials, according to Matthew W. Johnson, associate professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Just 2 or 3 experiences with the psychedelic drug helped a dozen long-term smokers quit, succeeding in a study where numerous other approaches failed.

    ?Quitting smoking isn?t a simple biological reaction to psilocybin, as with other medications that directly affect nicotine receptors,? Johnson says. ?When administered after careful preparation and in a therapeutic context, psilocybin can lead to deep reflection about one?s life and spark motivation to change.?

    10 men and 5 women, all mentally and physically healthy, participated in the study. The average age of the study participants was 51; they smoked, on average, 19 cigarettes a day for 31 years; and had repeatedly tried and failed to stop smoking. Ten participants reported minimal past use of psychedelics, with the most recent use being an average of 27 years before study intake. Five had never used psychedelics.

    After informing subjects about what their experience with the drug might be like, the first dose of psilocybin was administered by pill the day each participant planned to quit smoking. Two subsequent sessions, with higher doses of the mind-altering drug, were held two weeks and eight weeks later.

    During each psilocybin session, which lasted six to seven hours, participants were closely monitored by 2 members of the research team in a comfortable, homelike setting. Most of the time, participants wore eyeshades and earphones that played music, and they were encouraged to relax and focus on their inner experiences.

    The hallucinogenic compound was administered as part of a comprehensive cognitive behavior therapy smoking cessation program that included weekly one-on-one counseling sessions and techniques such as keeping a diary before quitting in order to assess when and why cravings occur.

    The researchers, who are part of a team that has long had federal funding to study the psychoactive effects of psychedelic drugs, suggest psilocybin may help break the addictive pattern of thoughts and behaviors that have become ingrained after years of smoking. The benefits also seem to last after the drug has worn off.

    Johnson?s next study will compare smoking success rates for people who take psilocybin to those for people who use nicotine patches. He will use MRI scans to study brain activity in participants.

    https://nutritionreview.org/2014/12/...gic-mushrooms/

    .
    Reply With Quote
     

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •