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    Ketamine Infusion Therapy (KIT) for Fibromyalgia and Rhumatoid Arthritis


    Treatment with intravenous ketamine eased pain significantly in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and fibromyalgia, a case report shows.

    The report, “Intravenous Ketamine Alleviates Pain in a Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient With Comorbid Fibromyalgia,” was published in the journal The Journal of Medical Cases.

    Patients with RA are at increased risk to develop fibromyalgia. Both disorders disproportionally affect women. RA may be treated with diverse types of medications that target pro-inflammatory cytokines — molecules released by immune cells — including analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), glucocorticoids, and disease-modifying therapies.

    However, lack of response in some patients and medication-related problems warrant evaluation of alternative treatments.

    Intravenous (IV) ketamine has been an FDA-approved medication for nearly 50 years. Ketamine blocks the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor, which is key in neuronal communication and is involved in regulating pain signals in the brain and spinal cord. Excessive activation of this receptor may cause toxicity, leading to various pain disorders.

    By blocking NMDA receptors, ketamine may correct this over-activation. However, ketamine’s therapeutic effects go well beyond its levels in the body, which leads scientists to speculate that it induces secondary changes that result in durable benefits.

    A combination of analgesic, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects have been proposed for ketamine, which makes it promising for treating RA, according to the authors.

    This report describes the case of a 49-year old woman with RA whose arthritis did not respond to conventional treatment options and resulted in permanent, extreme pain. She reported joint pain with stiffness in the morning in hands and shoulders, which limited finger and wrist movement and reduced her quality of life significantly.

    The patient also had diffuse muscular pain and met diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia.

    "Several treatment options, including physical therapy and conventional medications, did not achieve adequate pain control for either condition, so I decided to use [IV] ketamine as an alternative therapeutic option,” Ashraf Hanna, MD, the study’s lead author, said in a press release.

    The patient started a 10-day IV ketamine infusion treatment for four hours per day. The initial dose was 428 mg, gradually increased to 1,063 mg.

    She reported decreased pain after the first infusion session, and being almost pain-free after the last session. She also was no longer experiencing RA symptoms, including joint pain and morning stiffness.

    Although he noted this is the first published report on the use of ketamine in RA, Hanna considered that “ketamine appears to possess unique immunomodulatory and analgesic properties that effectively reduce inflammation and reduce pain without the use of opioid/NSAID analgesics.”

    The authors cautioned that the findings are from only one patient and did not compare ketamine with placebo. However, “we are hopeful that future adequately powered and placebo-controlled clinical trials may confirm that ketamine is safe and effective for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as RA,” they wrote.

    Unlike in the past, ketamine’s effectiveness is now recognized by diverse insurance companies. “We hope to continue to add new Ketamine-compliant insurance companies in 2018,” Hanna said.

    “I have provided over 8,000 ketamine infusions and have seen so many incredible successes over the past 5 years. Some of my patients were unable to move a limb or walk, and now they have complete mobility and can walk unaided.” Hanna said.

    https://fibromyalgianewstoday.com/20...ra-study-says/
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    Citizen scientists using psilocybin to cure their headaches


    When Tyler Mann first started getting cluster headaches a little over a decade ago, he'd crawl into his bathroom, turn off the lights, shut the door, and scream as loud as he
    could for up to an hour until the pain went away. Sometimes he'd pass out before that happened. Other times he'd contemplate suicide.

    "I've had headaches where I was literally considering hanging myself from the shower rod," Mann told me. "Literally, I wanted to just wrap a belt around my neck and make it stop, several times. That's why I don't own a gun."

    In the beginning, he'd get the headaches as often as six times per day, for months at a time. His doctors offered no explanation. So, like many people with more symptoms than solutions, he turned to the internet for help. That's when he discovered a Facebook group where thousands of others said they suffered from the same condition, a little-known neurological disease called cluster headaches, for which there is very little research and no known cure. They referred to themselves as "clusterheads," and each was more desperate for relief than the next. Many of them, frustrated with the lack of clinical studies, had turned to extreme methods of treatment.

    According to users of the group, one thing seemed to consistently provide long-term relief: psychedelics like mushrooms, LSD, and DMT, all of which consist of Tryptamine, an alkaloid that is believed to activate serotonin receptors in the brain. The most obvious problem, though, is that all of these drugs are illegal in the United State, scheduled in the same high-risk category as heroin, which means they are far from medically proven, and the self-administered dosing and its results can be wildly inconsistent. For people like Mann, who describes this form of self-medication as "citizen science," the risk is worth it if it means not having to endure debilitating pain and suicidal thoughts on a regular basis.

    "We're basically experimenting on ourselves," said Mann, an Austin-based filmmaker who's worked as a camera operator on shows like CNN's High Profits and TLC's My 600-lb Life. "We are using ourselves as guinea pigs because we don't have any other options. We can either just live in pain or we can try and fix it ourselves."

    Since he started taking psychedelic mushrooms as medicine about three years ago, Mann, now 37, says the cluster headaches have all but come to a halt, occurring something like every year and a half as opposed to multiple times a day. He calls mushrooms a "wonder drug." And yes, even though he's technically ingesting them in the name of science, he still hallucinates every time. "You get used to it. It's just like taking a pill," he said.

    Of course, not every cluster headache sufferer wants to break the law or trip balls just to get some relief, and not everyone believes psychedelics will be beneficial to them. The absolute dearth of reliable treatment options is part of the reason Mann has decided to make a documentary about what it's really like to suffer from cluster headaches. He hopes the project, dubbed Clusterheads and funded largely using donations from sufferers, will draw more attention to the condition and ultimately help sway the US government to invest more money and resources into studying it.

    Cluster headaches, named for their occurrence in cycles or groups, were first documented in the 18th Century. In a scientific paper, the Dutch-Austrian physician Gerard van Swieten described a middle-aged patient who suffered from the condition every day at the same hour as feeling "as if his eye was protruding from its orbit with so much pain that he became mad."

    The British neurologist Wilfred Harris is credited with publishing the first complete medical description of cluster headaches in 1926. In it, he observed that the attacks could last for anywhere between ten minutes and several hours and might strike patients at the same time every day, recurring for weeks and then disappearing for months at a time (these are now referred to as episodic) or in some cases, every day for years on end (now called chronic). The pain, he wrote, was "likened to a knife being driven in through a point between the outer canthus of the eye and the hair line," far more intense and debilitating than even the most serious migraine.

    "Some people say it's like an ice pick going through their eyeball, Mann told me. But for him, he said, "it's more like somebody drilling into my skull through my temple and scraping around in the inside of my skull and the back of my eye."

    The World Health Organization estimates that cluster headaches affect fewer than one in 1,000 adults, often developing after the age of 20 and occurring disproportionately among men. That's roughly in line with a commentary published in the Journal of Neurology & Stroke in 2015 estimating that 400,000 people in the US and 7 million people worldwide were sufferers.

    Still, those numbers are likely underreported since it's not uncommon for patients like Mann to go years without a confirmed medical diagnosis. "There are thousands of other people who are just like me who have this condition who don't know what it is, Mann said. Some of them have probably committed suicide because of it. They just didn't know what it was and were living in pain and didn't know how to treat it."

    For all the pain and suffering that comes along with it, cluster headaches remain largely a mystery to the medical community today. Doctors still don't know exactly what causes it or why, and supposedly preventive measures such as deep brain stimulation, or surgically implanting a pacemaker in the brain remain experimental at best and expensive and ineffective at worst.

    Meanwhile, treatments like oxygen therapy, which are believed to abort the headaches essentially by inducing hyperventilation through an oxygen mask, are only short-term remedies. Plus, they can be costly, Mann says, with few if any insurance companies covering it specifically as a treatment for cluster headaches.

    "Getting mushrooms is actually easier than getting oxygen, believe it or not," he said.

    But it doesn't have to be that way. In the last several years, grassroots groups like ClusterBusters, a nonprofit that was started in the early 2000s by sufferer Bob Wold after he discovered hallucinogens had helped his cluster headaches, have joined an annual advocacy event called Headache on the Hill. At the event at the US Capitol next month, the so-called cluster headache sufferers will meet with members of Congress to lobby for more research and funding through the National Institutes of Health, which they believe has long overlooked cluster headaches as a serious nerve condition.

    Part of the problem is that, "It's not a public-facing disease, Mann explained. It's very much in the closet." Even the name of it is particularly misleading, or at least extremely understated. "If a regular headache caused by a hangover or allergies is like getting a paper cut on your finger," he says, then "a cluster headache is like sawing your arm off with a rusty saw with no anesthesia."

    So far, progress has been slow. Sufferers like Mann expect an uphill battle with the Trump administration, which may seek to roll back marijuana legalization at a time when scientists are finally started to study the medicinal benefits of hallucinogenic drugs. But there are small victories worth celebrating: A landmark 2006 Harvard University study, for example, showing that LSD and psilocybin, the psychedelic compound found in mushrooms, had benefited sufferers of cluster headaches. The study of 53 patients, which Clusterbusters took credit for as a result of their lobbying, found that 22 of 26 psilocybin users reported that the drug had aborted their headache attacks.

    "It's life changing, honestly," said Mann. "Without the psychedelics, I don't even know if I would still be here on this Earth, and I have the people in ClusterBusters and the Facebook support group to thank for that."

    As they push to be taken seriously, clusterheads all over the world have banded together like a ragtag group of skull-rattling outsiders, sometimes with no else to rely on but each other and their own amateur insights. In Facebook groups, on message boards, and at an annual conference, they share their own stories of pain, experimentation, and recovery, one mushroom trip at a time.

    https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/p...ster-headaches
    Last edited by mr peabody; 27-11-2018 at 07:35.
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    Recommended CBD regimen for pain management

    When formulating a CBD regimen for a specific disease or illness (like chronic or neurological pain), it's important to understand that CBD should be used regularly for maximum relief, meaning it is used as a preventative first. It can also be used to manage acute flair ups, but preventative maintenance is the key. As with any other dietary supplement, you want to establish a baseline concentration in your system.

    Daily Maintenance

    In order to manage pain, it is recommended to ingest full spectrum CBD oil daily in the form of tinctures or gel capsules. The ingredients in the two products are the same; the only difference between the two is the form factor and dosage, pills vs. sublingual tinctures. Those suffering from any kind of pain start with 5-10mg per day of CBD. If relief is not felt at this dosage, it is suggested to increase that by 5-10mg until the desired effects are achieved. The gel capsules contain 25mg of CBD per pill. There is no harm in starting at 25mg CBD daily as you cannot overdose on CBD, nor are there any serious side effects. CBD provides sustained relief for several hours, many people find it provides relief for the whole day! The one thing to keep in mind with ingestible CBD products is the delayed onset time, it can take up to 90 minutes for the full effects of the tinctures or capsules to be felt.

    For pain located in the skin, bones, muscle, ligaments, tendons, or myofascial tissue, we also recommend supplementing with a topical CBD salve, to penetrate deep beneath the skin layer to reduce inflammation and pain. Relief can be felt within 15 minutes and lasts several hours. Simply re-apply as necessary.

    Managing acute flairups

    In addition to the daily pain management program outlined above, many people find they still need a safe way to manage acute flairups. Whether it's caused by a recent injury, cold weather, or general aggravation, vaporizing CBD isolate is recommended to combat these acute pain flairups. The benefit of vaporizing CBD isolate is that the relief can be felt almost instantaneously. CBD isolate is 99% pure CBD and provides a wave of relief that can be felt throughout the whole body.

    You can also ingest more CBD in the form of tinctures or pills to combat these flairups, just keep in mind that the onset time will be significantly longer than vaporizing. CBD topical salves can also be used to manage acute pain flairups.

    https://keytocannabis.com/blogs/cann...ain-management


    Last edited by mr peabody; 17-11-2018 at 11:38.
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    Ketamine may help treat migraine pain unresponsive to other therapies

    Ketamine, a medication commonly used for pain relief and increasingly used for depression, may alleviate migraine pain in patients who have not been helped by other treatments,
    suggests a study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2017 annual meeting.

    The study of 61 patients found that almost 75 percent experienced an improvement in their migraine intensity after a 3 to 7 day course of inpatient treatment with ketamine. The drug
    is used to induce general anesthesia but also provides powerful pain control for patients with many painful conditions in lower doses than its anesthetic use.

    "Ketamine may hold promise as a treatment for migraine headaches in patients for whom other treatments have failed," said study co-author Eric Schwenk, M.D., director of orthopedic anesthesia at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. "Our study focused only on short-term relief, but it is encouraging that this treatment might have the potential to help patients long-term. Our work provides the basis for future, prospective studies that involve larger numbers of patients."

    An estimated 12 percent of the U.S. population suffers from migraines, recurring attacks of throbbing or pulsing moderate to severe pain. A subset of these patients, along with those who suffer from other types of headaches, do not respond to treatment. People with migraines are often very sensitive to light, sound and may become nauseated or vomit. Migraines are three times more common in women than in men.

    Researchers reviewed data for patients who received ketamine infusions for intractable migraine headaches, migraines that have failed all other therapies. On a scale of 0-10, the average migraine headache pain rating at admission was 7.5, compared with 3.4 on discharge. The average length of infusion was 5.1 days, and the day of lowest pain ratings was day 4. Adverse effects were generally mild.

    Dr. Schwenk said while his hospital uses ketamine to treat migraines, the treatment is not widely available. Thomas Jefferson University Hospital will open a new infusion center this fall that will treat more patients with headaches using ketamine. "We hope to expand its use to both more patients and more conditions in the future," he said.

    "Due to the retrospective nature of the study, we cannot definitively say that ketamine is entirely responsible for the pain relief, but we have provided a basis for additional larger studies to be undertaken," Dr. Schwenk added.

    https://www.asahq.org/about-asa/news...ther-therapies
    Last edited by mr peabody; 06-12-2018 at 13:49.
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    Salvia: Wonder drug for chronic pain


    Salvia is a psychedelic plant native to the northeastern Sierra Mazateca mountain region of Mexico where the native Mazatecs have used it for centuries as a healing and divining tool.

    In 2005 I gained the diagnosis of New Daily Persistent Headaches. Simply put, I have a constant headache that varies from a light thrumming to a full blown migraine. Over the years I have seen too many doctors and neurologists. I have tried a number of different pain killers, anti-depressants, marijuana, acid, meditation, hypnosis, acupuncture, relaxation therapy, positive thinking, reflexology, naturopathy, and more to manage my chronic pain. It was only in 2013 I tried Salvia and discovered its potential for pain management.

    Given my extensive history with neurology, and my particular knowledge field as a student of chemical engineering, I decided to start a study of Salvia. I began microdosing with 50x Salvia in order to analyze the experience I had coming up.

    The way Salvia grips my mind is like hitting a reset button. Most pain killers alleviate the feeling of chronic pain. Many other pills were designed to lower intensity and consistency of headaches and migraines. Salvia however completely removed me from the experience of pain. I also find it much more affordable and pleasurable than popping painkillers constantly.

    Salvia is one the best things I have ever found. It took me from a world of constant pain to one of spiritual exploration. I've approached a number of neurologists and psychiatrists with regards to Salvia?s potential as a healing medicine, especially in regards to chronic pain, but none were interested. So I venture to the internet in hopes that my experience can possible help those in need.

    In summary, Salvia does wonders for my chronic pain. I have studied Salvia from a scientific point of view, and Salvia can act as a reset for the mind, bringing users to a calm space removed of all prior stress and pain.

    Salvia is not for everyone. But I think that it is worth a try if done properly, as the potential benefits are great, especially for those with chronic illness as a natural alternative to pills.
    I smoke Salvia most days, and I don't intend to stop.

    https://erowid.org/experiences/exp.php?ID=106369
    Last edited by mr peabody; 31-12-2018 at 14:10.
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    Does CBD oil need THC in it to work on pain?

    For some patients, it does, for others no. I use almost pure CBD in the tincture I make..the cannabis I use, is 10% CBD and 0.01% THC. This works fine for me, though I use a regular medium THC percent cannabis for sleep assistance. IMHO, the best thing about using almost totally pure CBD is that I can take it all day and not be impaired while driving or performing my regular routine.

    Most of we medical cannabis consumers have tried several options prior to finding out what works for us. Trial and error is, so far, the only way to determine your specific need for your specific pain level. Cannabis replaced 180mg of methadone 3 times a day for me, after several years of slowly lowering my daily methadone intake I also used CBD to help curtail the withdrawal symptoms.

    Elle Hayes

    -----

    THC usually helps increase CBD’s pain relieving effects. A CBD:THC ratio of 20:1 is usually more effective than CBD alone. Some people may even prefer 10:1, 2:1, or 1:1 ratios. In my own experience, neurologically based pain requires less THC and a higher total dose, while systemic pain requires more THC and a relatively lower total dose. One theory states that the whole plant product - including CBD, THC and many other components - is greater than the sum of it’s parts.

    Thomas Wrona

    -----

    You can also take a combination of the two, at a specific ratio. A lot of people use a 20:1 ratio of CBD/THC, lots of CBD, not much THC, and report greater pain relief. There are studies that show that THC can increase the effect of CBD for pain relief, but some people don’t like the "high" of THC.

    Martin Walker

    -----

    I'm 45 and have my own landscape maintenance business. All summer I have been having knee pains, back pain and carpel tunnel symptoms in my hands. A few weeks ago I found out about CBD oil and started using it. Within 3 days every bit of pain disappeared. Each morning I will take about 20 drops (it tastes like peppermint) and it seems to keep all my aches and pains away. This particular CBD Oil is very potent, with 750 mg of CBD and less than .03 percent of THC. Different things work for different people but this one worked great for me. I believe in it so much I got involved and became a distributor aka affiliate. Here is my website if you would like to try this product or also join us in helping others get the product.

    Shawn Cox

    -----

    I started taking 500 mg for pain but my pain was still present. I increased my dose to 1500 mg and that made all the difference. My pain is gone with the exception of a flare up, then I just increase my dose.

    CBD Melanie

    -----

    For pain I would take a full spectrum CBD product. A full spectrum CBD product contains CBD and trace amounts of THC usually between 2–4%. I would say the ideal combo for pain management is high CBD, low THC. This combo has been proven to show strong results in the pain management sector.

    Chad Waldman

    -----

    CBD works best when used in combination with at least some THC, to help it to bind to the receptor in your body, your cannabinoid receptors. You should try 2 drops of weak tincture under your tongue, and wait 30 minutes, you can continue to titrate to a dose that gets the results you want. If a weak tincture doesn’t work, you can go up in strengths.

    Barb Kueber
    Last edited by mr peabody; 31-12-2018 at 14:10.
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    I suffer from chronic back pain and neuropathy. I was on opiates, Neurontin and Lyrica for years. The opiates worked for a time, but tolerance developed, and it will damage your GI. Lyrica and neurontin did nothing for my neuropathy. Then I tried cannabis, and Indica is the only strain that worked. I made a tincture with cannabis and pure grain alcohol. It works great. I take it sublingually. It works so much better than smoking it. I think the natural anti-inflammatories in the cannabis build up over time and help even more.

    https://www.dmt-nexus.me/forum/defau...posts&m=668946

    -----

    How cannabis oil helped me get off painkillers

    In a backpacking hostel during a stag weekend 10 years ago, I fell asleep on a top bunk next to an open window. Of course, that now strikes me as a stupid thing to have done, but at the time I didn’t give it a thought. I was on a weekend away, not a health-and-safety awareness course. At some point during the night, I tried getting out of the bunk, but instead of turning left and using the ladder, I turned right and hopped straight out of the window.

    I fell 24ft on to concrete. From a survival point of view, I was lucky to land on my feet. The downside was that some rather important sections of my legs did not come out of it so well.

    My left heel was crushed, while over on the right, my tibia and fibula – the two long bones in the lower leg – detached from their couplings and shattered. The next few weeks involved operations, plates, screws and quite unimaginable levels of agony. At one point, I felt a kind of blinding calm, as though the pain had gone all the way up the scale and rung a bell at the top.

    While those pain levels have never returned, over the years there have been generous helpings of it; my legs didn’t take too kindly to being smashed up and bolted back together, and they seem to enjoy reminding me of this. After trying many different ways of managing the pain, eight months ago I started taking cannabidiol, or CBD for short – a non-psychoactive compound found in both hemp and cannabis plants.

    The effect on the pain has been profound. It comes as an oil that I put under my tongue whenever pain moves from a dull niggle to the kind that is difficult to ignore.

    CBD influences the release and uptake of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin, leading to many potential therapeutic uses. Crucially, it does not contain any THC, the psychoactive component of cannabis; in other words, CBD does not get you high. Since last year, it has been legal to buy in the UK, after the government’s Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHPR) approved its use as a medicine under licence.

    CBD oil has since been prescribed to an 11-year-old British boy suffering from epilepsy, in what is believed to be the first instance of a cannabis-derivative being prescribed on the NHS.

    Last month, a cancer patient diagnosed 4 years ago with an incurable brain tumor and given just 6 months to live, ascribed her incredible recovery to turning to cannabis oil as a last resort.

    While research into the medical benefits of CBD oil is in its infancy, it is certainly encouraging. Recent reports suggest it could be a more useful anti-inflammatory than ibuprofen.

    “There has been some early scientific evidence that CBD can help with inflammation,” says Dr Henry Fisher, of drug policy thinktank Volteface. “There is also a lot of anecdotal evidence that it helps people who do contact sports, because of the tendency to get inflamed joints. Taking other anti-inflammatories like ibuprofen on a long-term basis – as many sportspeople do – is not a good idea because of potential damage to your liver.”

    "It also has distinct advantages over opioid medicines," says Dr Fisher. “With CBD, there is no evidence of any long-term negative impact, and no likelihood of addiction. And, of course, there are no known cases of anybody overdosing on CBD.”

    The comparison to prescription medicine is particularly pertinent. For several months after my accident, I took Oxycontin, a common opioid painkiller. It was very useful at that time because it gave me a warm fuzzy feeling, making everything seem okay. But after a while, I started waking up feeling groggy and crushed. So I decided to stop, and the withdrawal was horrendous. It was several days of indescribable misery, so bad that it made the pain from the injuries feel like a slightly over-zealous massage.

    Getting off that heavy-duty medicine was key for my recovery. Because this kind of medication saps your energy, and the one thing you need to fight back to full fitness is energy. I spent months in a wheelchair, then on crutches, then finally I was able to start taking slow, painful steps on legs that had forgotten what their purpose was.

    Everyone that uses it tells a similar story: they sleep better and feel less pain. While there are ongoing trials for CBD as a treatment for everything from multiple sclerosis to Parkinson’s disease, all I know is that for me it can make the difference being sitting on the sofa and being able to go training. I can now lift and carry my children without wincing.

    CBD does not make the pain go away completely, but that is okay – a bit of pain is necessary, an alarm system to warn of imminent peril. But once the message has been received, it is nice to be able to turn the volume down a little bit.

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-f...en-painkiller/
    Last edited by mr peabody; 09-01-2019 at 07:28.
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    CBD suppository for menstrual pain

    A company that makes marijuana products for women, including suppositories designed to target menstrual cramps, is about to see how well they work in treating the symptoms associated with periods. A new study conducted by Staci Gruber, a Harvard professor, will look at responses from 400 women about menstrual symptoms while using the suppository.

    While various compounds in cannabis have long been thought to alleviate symptoms associated with pain and stress from menstruation, there hasn't been a lot of research to back it up.
    A startup in Venice Beach, California, is seeking to change that. It has released a line of products including lotions, sprays, vaporizer pens, and marijuana suppositories. While the new product has been nicknamed a "weed tampon," it's not exactly that. Rather, it is a suppository pill that when inserted into the body, quickly gets absorbed. The suppositories are forming the basis of an observational study of 400 women to see how marijuana-based products affect the symptoms associated with periods.

    So far, they've raised $2 million in venture capital funding. The company's THC-containing products are available in Colorado and California, where cannabis is legal for adult use, and will be available in Canada once legalization goes into effect later this month.

    The new CBD products, like its new vaporizer pen, are available online and can be shipped worldwide. CBD is a non-psychoactive compound in cannabis that has been linked to a range of health benefits but cannot get you high.

    Though the legality of CBD is something of a gray area, products containing it are widely available in most states, as long as they don't contain THC, the psychoactive component of marijuana responsible for a high. the company says the products are effective because of what's known as the "entourage effect" of the active compounds in marijuana.

    "We now know the minute you break this plant apart into its component parts, you lose some of the magic," a spokesperson said. "This is proven out again and again, in study after study, that the entourage effect as we understand it is real."

    Putting it to the test

    Staci Gruber, a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and the director of the Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Core and the Marijuana Investigations for Neuroscientific Discovery program at the McLean Hospital in Massachusetts, is using the marijuana suppository as part of the observational study.

    The study will be funded in part by Flow Kana, a marijuana grower and distributor that will provide the products to participants.

    "What we're looking to do is take anecdotal information and turn it into data,"
    Gruber told Business Insider. The observational study will survey participating women over a few months, asking them to record what their symptoms are like while using the suppository.

    The study is viewed as a first step, with the "holy grail" being a clinical trial that determines how such products compare with a placebo group in relieving menstrual symptoms.
    Running a clinical trial, however, can be an expensive and difficult endeavor, especially because marijuana is considered a Schedule 1 drug.

    First, researchers must go through a lengthy application process, which can take years, to obtain a permit to conduct a study. And all cannabis used for research must be purchased through the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Many researchers have said the institute's supply is of poor quality, with low concentrations of THC.

    "What actually made this market was empathy,"
    the spokesperson said. "We serve the plant, we serve our clients. And as a result, our investment community, and the people that support our brand, benefit from that."

    https://www.businessinsider.com/fori...cramps-2018-10

    -----

    Cannabis effective at treating Fibromyalgia

    Cannabis therapy mitigates symptoms of the chronic pain condition fibromyalgia and is associated with a reduction in the use of other prescription drugs, according to clinical data published online ahead of print in the Journal of Clinical Rheumatology. 3 to 6 million Americans suffer from fibromyalgia, which is often poorly controlled by standard pain medications.

    Israeli investigators assessed the safety and efficacy of inhaled cannabis in a cohort of 26 patients with fibromyalgia. They reported that medical cannabis treatment “was associated with significant favorable outcomes in every item evaluated,” such as reductions in pain and increases in energy.

    Most patients also reduced their use of conventional prescription drugs, such as opiates and benzodiazepines, during the trial period. Nearly half of the participants (46 percent) reduced their prescription drug intake by more than 50 percent during the study. Several patients were also able to return to work following the initiation of cannabis therapy.

    Researchers concluded, “Medical cannabis treatment had a significant favorable effect on patients with fibromyalgia, with few adverse effects.”

    Prior trials evaluating the use of either whole-plant cannabis or synthetic cannabinoids have similarly shown efficacy in patients with the disease. A summary of these prior studies is available here.

    https://blog.norml.org/2018/03/05/st...-fibromyalgia/
    Last edited by mr peabody; 02-01-2019 at 07:36.
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    CBD oil, a drug-free approach to treating chronic pain*

    We are now at the cutting edge of a new, safe, natural and supportive approach to treating chronic pain. And this approach is borne out of an understanding of a critically important natural physiologic system of the human body…the endocannabinoid system. The endocannabinoid system is a network of receptors in the human body that may well be the backbone of homeostasis. These receptors serve as a signaling system in the human body and are present in the central nervous system (CB1 receptors) as well as the peripheral nervous system and the immune system (CB2 receptors).

    This system was discovered and named as a result of studying the effects of marijuana (derived from the plant cannabis sativa). The main psycho-active constituent of marijuana is THC. The reason marijuana has the effects it has is that the THC binds to this receptor network in the human body and induces feelings of exhilaration, relaxation and a feeling of well-being. These are the very same effects induced by endogenous neurotransmitters and endorphins – naturally occurring chemicals in the human body- that are the guardians of homeostasis. These naturally occurring chemicals can either keep our bodies running smoothly or intervene on behalf of health threats to guide the immune system to either repair and/or replace our cells (primary inflammation) or to protect the cells that cannot be repaired or replaced (chronic inflammation).

    So we begin to see that instead of using drugs to block pain and inflammation, supporting and stimulating the endocannabinoid system can drive the human body to heal and repair. It’s important to note that both pain and inflammation are natural defense mechanisms. When we ingest drugs that block pain and inflammation, we are essentially blocking our defense mechanisms. To be clear, each night when we go to sleep, the pathway of primary inflammation works to detoxify our cells, repair injured cells and replace dead cells. This is a natural pathway that produces no pain and is essential for the maintenance of homeostasis. This is why sleep is so important. However, if the immune system is burdened by poor quality food, toxins from air and water, high levels of stress, lack of sleep and any number of other mechanisms causing immune deficiency, the pathway of primary inflammation will be overwhelmed and inefficient.

    When we use drugs to block pain and inflammation, we wind up with a long list of potentially dangerous side effects. What has kept THC out of the realm of treating chronic pain is its association with inebriation and the fact that it is classified as an illegal drug. However, cannabis also contains high amounts of another naturally occurring compound known as CBD oil (CannaBiDiol). CBD has no psycho-active properties so there is no associated “high” with ingesting it. CBD is is not classified as a drug, it is legal in all 50 states, does not require a medical marijuana prescription and binds to our CB1 and CB2 receptors to drive a more potent primary inflammatory response similar to our naturally occurring neurotransmitters and endorphins. What is more remarkable is that it is not associated with any of the side-effects that are seen with drug therapy. Taken as directed it is incredibly safe. And if taken consistently, it can relieve pain and inflammation and reduce or eliminate the need for drug therapy. CBD is available to buy in capsules, as sub-lingual gels, tinctures and topical salves, but you can easily (and inexpensively) make high quality CBD oil yourself.

    When we realize that CBD oil works with our bodies instead of against it, we understand why its safety profile is so high. It is my sincere hope that CBD oil will, in time, be accepted as part of the standard of care for pain and inflammation.

    *From the article here: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/cbd-oil-as-a-drug-free-approach-to-treating-chronic_us_59a5927fe4b0b234aecad26c



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    Can ketamine replace opioids for acute pain in emergency care?

    Opioids are a mainstay in the management of acute pain, but due to their side effects, physicians are under increased pressure to be more selective in their prescription. A recent review investigated if ketamine for pain management is a viable alternative in the emergency department.

    The most common symptom during visits to the emergency department is acute pain. Managing this pain is a major aspect of initial care in hospital settings and opioids are an effective and widely available treatment option. However, there is an increased push from physician research groups to reduce overall prescriptions of opioids in emergency care settings while improving health outcomes for patients.

    Ketamine for pain management has been recognized as a possible alternative. An inhibitor of NMDA receptors in nerve cells, ketamine can create dissociative anaesthetic states with hallucinatory sensations at higher doses. In the emergency department, ketamine is often administered at sub-dissociative doses as a sedative during procedures and for intubated patients.

    Comparing ketamine to opioids for pain management

    A team of researchers in the United States recently completed a systematic review comparing the effect of low-dose ketamine to opioids for adult pain management in the emergency department. Their full report was published in Academic Emergency Medicine.

    Studies were included in the systematic review if they were randomized controlled trials comparing intravenous low dose ketamine to opioids in emergency department settings. They excluded pediatric studies, studies that were not placebo-controlled, did not report pain scores or co-administered additional medications.

    Due to stricter selection criteria compared to previous reviews on the subject, the literature search and study selection yielded three studies totaling 261 patients. After extracting and pooling the pain scores from the selected studies, ketamine was found to be comparable in effectiveness to opioids in the treatment of acute pain.

    Ketamine is comparable to opioids without the respiratory effects

    Adverse events were associated with ketamine administration and were mainly related to lower urinary tract symptoms, including increased urinary frequency as well as the possibility of renal failure. Opioids had side effects differing in nature, including nausea, vomiting, and respiratory depression. Ketamine administration may therefore be preferable to opioids, in elderly patients or patients with pulmonary disorders where opioid use can cause respiratory depression or failure.

    Concerns regarding addiction

    Concerns over addiction have been one of the driving forces to find alternatives to opioids, but according to the study authors there is little evidence linking addiction with acute administration of opioids in the emergency department. With chronic use, ketamine has the potential to lead to addiction as well.

    This systematic review suggests that ketamine for pain management is a viable alternative to opioids for in the emergency department. Due to the risks of prescribing opioids in certain patient subgroups, the authors maintain that ketamine can provide comparable levels of pain relief while avoiding respiratory side effects.

    https://www.medicalnewsbulletin.com/...ids-emergency/

    -----

    RCs closest to Ketamine


    MXE (3-MeO-2-Oxo-PCE) will be the RC closest to ketamine.

    -fireflagknown (reddit)

    ---

    I prefer 2f-ket. It is shorter lasting but feels cleaner and closer to real ket. Duration is 2-3 hours.

    -Mutagenic_pasta (reddit)

    ---

    Methoxmetamine (MXM) is probably the RC closest to ketamine. MXE is superior for me but not much like k.

    -K8hudson1 (reddit)

    ---

    MXE and O-PCE are very similar, and my all time favorite drugs ever that have extreme anti-depressive qualities.

    -RCluminati (reddit)

    ---

    Deschloroketamine (aka O-PCM, DXE, and DCK) is advertised as a ketamine replacement. It's much cheaper. I found it
    to be about 2x more potent than K, and last about twice as long.

    https://www.erowid.org/experiences/exp.php?ID=107008

    ---

    There is an RC chemical out called 2-FDCK / 2-fluorodeschloroketamine. I've been looking at that as a substitute [for pain].

    -anon (BL)


    Last edited by mr peabody; 19-01-2019 at 09:25.
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    Ketamine infusion therapy for Fibromyalgia and Rhumatoid Arthritis

    Treatment with intravenous ketamine eased pain significantly in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and fibromyalgia, a case report shows.

    The report, Intravenous Ketamine Alleviates Pain in a Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient With Comorbid Fibromyalgia, was published in the journal The Journal of Medical Cases.

    Patients with RA are at increased risk to develop fibromyalgia. Both disorders disproportionally affect women. RA may be treated with diverse types of medications that target pro-inflammatory cytokines - molecules released by immune cells - including analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), glucocorticoids, and disease-modifying therapies.

    However, lack of response in some patients and medication-related problems warrant evaluation of alternative treatments.

    Intravenous (IV) ketamine has been an FDA-approved medication for nearly 50 years. Ketamine blocks the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor, which is key in neuronal communication and is involved in regulating pain signals in the brain and spinal cord. Excessive activation of this receptor may cause toxicity, leading to various pain disorders.

    By blocking NMDA receptors, ketamine may correct this over-activation. However, ketamine?s therapeutic effects go well beyond its levels in the body, which leads scientists to speculate that it induces secondary changes that result in durable benefits.

    A combination of analgesic, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects have been proposed for ketamine, which makes it promising for treating RA, according to the authors.

    This report describes the case of a 49-year old woman with RA whose arthritis did not respond to conventional treatment options and resulted in permanent, extreme pain. She reported joint pain with stiffness in the morning in hands and shoulders, which limited finger and wrist movement and reduced her quality of life significantly.

    The patient also had diffuse muscular pain and met diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia.

    Several treatment options, including physical therapy and conventional medications, "did not achieve adequate pain control for either condition, so I decided to use [IV] ketamine as an alternative therapeutic option," Ashraf Hanna, MD, the study?s lead author, said in a press release.

    The patient started a 10-day IV ketamine infusion treatment for four hours per day. The initial dose was 428 mg, gradually increased to 1,063 mg.

    She reported decreased pain after the first infusion session, and being almost pain-free after the last session. She also was no longer experiencing RA symptoms, including joint pain and morning stiffness.

    Although he noted this is the first published report on the use of ketamine in RA, Hanna considered that "ketamine appears to possess unique immunomodulatory and analgesic properties that effectively reduce inflammation and reduce pain without the use of opioid/NSAID analgesics."

    The authors cautioned that the findings are from only one patient and did not compare ketamine with placebo. However, "we are hopeful that future adequately powered and placebo-controlled clinical trials may confirm that ketamine is safe and effective for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as RA," they wrote.

    Unlike in the past, ketamine's effectiveness is now recognized by diverse insurance companies. "We hope to continue to add new Ketamine-compliant insurance companies in 2018," Hanna said.

    "I have provided over 8,000 ketamine infusions and have seen so many incredible successes over the past 5 years. Some of my patients were unable to move a limb or walk, and now they have complete mobility and can walk unaided," Hanna said.

    https://fibromyalgianewstoday.com/20...ra-study-says/


    Last edited by mr peabody; 29-01-2019 at 13:12.
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    Psychoactive substances as a last resort—a qualitative study of self-treatment of Migraine and Cluster headaches*

    Martin Andersson, Mari Persson, Anette Kjellgren

    Migraine and cluster headache (CH) are prevailing, episodic, often chronic headache disorders that have a considerable impact on the individual and society. Especially, migraine with a prevalence of nearly 15% worldwide is a significant cause of disability and notably burdens medical costs and loss of productivity. Cluster headaches are a rarer but particularly painful and debilitating form of headache disorder with a prevalence around 1 in 1000 individuals. While there are numerous treatment practices for headache disorders, none are ideal and most exhibits unsatisfactory effectiveness, tolerability, or patient adherence. There are presently no pharmacological treatments available specifically developed for CH. The currently used methods originated as treatments for other indications and were found helpful in CH by chance. Considering that CH is one of the most intense and disabling pain conditions known, the urgency of the circumstances has led care providers and patients to try unusual or experimental remedies.

    Self-treatment with psychedelic tryptamines, primarily LSD and psilocybin, was reported to provide a significant lessening of the frequency and intensity of attacks in many cases of both CH and migraines. A full remission was also prevalently reported for both disorders. However, sufferers typically continued to use a psychedelic substance a few times a year to maintain their condition at a minimum. The findings largely confirm previous research indicating that psychedelic tryptamines appear effective for treatment of both CH and migraines, also in otherwise treatment-resistant patients.

    Conclusions

    Self-treatment of headache disorders is discussed in support groups online. Largely, this interest focuses on the use of the currently illegal psychoactive tryptamines, mainly psilocybin, LSD, and related substances. Often, this pursuit is driven by desperation, and these substances are considered a last resort. It was reported how several of the substances used can serve as potential treatments for migraine and CH. However, this population exposes themselves to risk by self-experimenting with illegal or sometimes new and unknown psychoactive substances. Given the vulnerability of this population, their situation is important to note and to consider seriously. This study also highlights the importance of the reciprocal knowledge production process and harm reduction content emerging from interactive drug forum discussions. More scientific studies are needed to develop safe and effective drugs.

    From the study here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5584001/

    .
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    Denver is working on a bill to legalize psylopsiben.

    Not there yet, but maybe someone will find this interesting.
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    Chronic sufferers choosing LSD and psilocybin for migraines


    I remember the day I got my first migraine pretty vividly. I was a freshman in high school sitting in math class, when all of a sudden, my vision became blurry. I soon felt shaky, nauseous, incredibly confused, and frightened by what was happening to me. But in the hour or two it took to see a doctor, my symptoms had disappeared.

    Eventually, I realized I had experienced my first migraine, and since then I suffer through a few every year. While they're pretty debilitating and can ruin an entire day, I'm lucky I don't suffer from chronic migraines like some do.

    In the U.S. it's estimated that roughly 3.2 million Americans live with chronic migraines and of that percentage, some experience 15 to 20 a month. These headaches last four hours or more on average, and often force sufferers to take days off work. This adds up to not only lost hours of their lives, but lost productivity and money. In fact, it's estimated up to $31 billion in productivity is lost annually from headache disabilities in the U.S. alone.

    I can tell when a migraine is coming on because of a chain of predictable symptoms. First, I begin to see auras and my vision is blurred, then all symptoms subside like the calm before a storm, and finally the piercing headache, nausea, vomiting, and shakiness.

    Hallucinations and bizarre visuals often accompany or signal to migraine sufferers they're about to endure a headache. The most common visual oddities are blurriness and auras, but some experience zigzags, swirling vortices, and Picasso-esque patterns. Physical hallucinations arent unusual either.

    During his first migraine, author, Anthony Peake, says, "I felt that the top of my head was lifting off and moving upwards toward the ceiling. Then I noticed the office seemed to be getting smaller, as if I was looking at it from the wrong end of a telescope."

    Only about 15 to 20 percent of migraine sufferers experience migraines with auras. These migraines can be so disorienting and confusing, sometimes rendering sufferers unable to communicate properly, almost like a stroke. But despite the well-documented symptoms and prevalence of these painful experiences, doctors still don't know what causes them exactly.

    Headache disorders are ranked 7th in all disabilities globally, though only 36 percent of sufferers are diagnosed. And migraines aren't even the worst type of debilitating headache - that title is reserved for cluster headaches.

    Cluster headaches have been described as one of the worst pains a human being can feel, worse than childbirth, or as one sufferer put it, worse than having a limb amputated without anesthesia. Cluster headaches have been nicknamed the suicide headache for reasons that can probably be inferred.

    These two types of headaches tend to occur in one gender more than the other, with migraines choosing women, and cluster headaches more often reserved for men. Some attribute this to hormonal functions, but no one really knows for certain.

    Specific things activate migraines, including caffeine, lack of sleep, alcohol, weather fluctuations, and stress. Cluster headaches, on the other hand, seem to fall into episodic cycles, and contrary to migraines, sleeping can actually trigger them. Sufferers often get cluster headaches as they're entering REM sleep, leading them to fear bedtime.

    LSD and psilocybin for migraines

    Sometime in 2015, well over a decade after my headaches began, I was at a friend's house when I felt the early signs of an oncoming migraine. I alerted my buddies to what would happen and the protocol I typically followed to deal with the next few hours of pain.

    My friend Sean said he wanted to make me something that might help my symptoms. So he whipped out his mortar and pestle and began making me a chunky paste, while I laid on the couch, preparing for the impending agony. After a few minutes, he came back with the paste and a glass of water, telling me to consume the strange concoction.

    I asked what was in it and he replied, "Some honey, various herbs, and some (magic) mushrooms. Not enough to make you trip, just a micro-dose, but there's a chance you might feel a body high. It will definitely help your symptoms, though."

    Now, full disclosure, I had taken psilocybin before, so I was familiar with its effects, but the idea of a potential psychedelic trip while suffering from a mind-numbing headache sounded like a horrible idea. But I trusted Sean and took the mushroom mixture.

    For chronic headache sufferers, there are a number of pharmaceuticals prescribed to mitigate their symptoms and lead a semi-normal life. Triptans are one of the most commonly prescribed, often paired with an NSAID, i.e. aspirin or ibuprofen. But these drugs are not a panacea and only provide temporary relief.

    Triptans are referred to as selective serotonin receptor agonists, stimulating serotonin production in the brain. This serotonin increase reduces inflammation and constricts blood vessels to alleviate the headache. Triptans belong to the tryptamine family of monoamine alkaloids. Coincidentally, the psychoactive compounds found in many psychedelics are also tryptamines.

    Psilocybin converts to psilocin in the body, becoming a partial agonist for serotonin receptors known as 5-HT receptors, particularly the 5-HT(2b) and 5-HT(2a) receptors. Psilocybin and other tryptamines, including DMT and LSD, are referred to as serotonergic psychedelics because they activate these serotonin receptors. Triptans work as agonists on serotonin receptors in the same way, but instead stimulate 5-HT(1b) and 5-HT(1d) receptors.

    For reasons not fully understood, the receptors that psilocybin and LSD target produce a psychedelic experience, while the receptors the triptans target do not. However, when both receptors are targeted, the psychedelic experience can be amplified immensely, but not in a pleasant way.

    Unsurprisingly, another pharmaceutical used in the past to treat migraines, due to its affinity for those 5-HT receptors, is ergotamine, a peptide derived from ergot fungus, first isolated by Arthur Stoll at Sandoz Pharmaceuticals in 1918. Stoll worked alongside Albert Hoffman, the famous chemist who first synthesized LSD at Sandoz from, you guessed it, ergotamine.

    When Hoffman accidentally synthesized LSD he had also worked to isolate psilocybin from the mushroom Psilocybe mexicana. Sandoz sold psilocybin to clinicians using it for psychotherapy, before the drug was criminalized in 1968. It's believed that Hoffman was actually working on synthesizing new medicines to treat headaches, which he may have apparently found, though the hype from his discovery's psychedelic properties completely overshadowed any other use for it.

    After Sean gave me the micro-dose of magic mushrooms, my headache began to play out as expected. My liver had to first process the psilocybin, convert it to psilocin, and release a number of metabolites into my bloodstream; a process that usually takes 30 to 45 minutes. But after that time had passed, it felt like I had skipped the worst part of my headache and was coasting through the dull afterglow that marks the latter stage of my migraines. I also felt a little woozy, the feeling I knew the mushrooms were responsible for.

    It seemed Sean's magic mushroom remedy worked. It didn't stop the headache dead in its tracks, but it did mitigate the pain significantly and shorten the span of it. Now, had I been working at the time, the subtle psychoactive effects of the psilocybin may have been distracting, but with a full-blown migraine, no work would have been accomplished anyway.

    Cluster Busters - Using psychedelics for headaches

    Triptans, steroids, and other pharmaceuticals prescribed to treat chronic bouts can have long-term side effects ranging from organ fibrosis, cardiac disturbances, and even osteoporosis. And while triptans are good for alleviating individual headaches, chronic sufferers have found that psychedelic serotonergics can break or even prevent the episodic cycles of headaches that recur on a predictable basis.

    Those unfortunate enough to suffer from cluster headaches experience as many as eight to 10 a day during cycles. Though they don't suffer year-round, cycles typically last anywhere from two to three-months, with each headache lasting anywhere from 45 minutes to three hours.

    Bob Wold is the founder and president of Cluster Busters, a group that has, for the past 15 years, advocated for the study and legal use of psilocybin and LSD for treatment of cluster headaches. Wold began suffering from them biannually for a period of 20 years after being misdiagnosed many times. He was ineffectually prescribed 75 different medications, including the highly addictive fentanyl and even cocaine drops.

    Wold was so desperate to ease the pain that he almost underwent an invasive, unproven surgery that would have severed his trigeminal nerves and destroyed all sensation in his face. That was, until he found an online forum touting the benefits of serotonergic psychedelics for treating his condition.

    Wold said he asked his two kids, who happened to be in college, to procure him the necessary psilocybin-containing mushrooms to see if they could ameliorate his agonizing pain. While he doesn't condone buying psilocybin mushrooms off the street, as acquiring them is illegal and hard to determine exact dosage, Wold was in a desperate state and willing to take risks.

    Shortly after using the drug to treat his headaches, Wold noticed an immediate difference, saying his head hadn't felt that good in the 20 years since his condition began. From then on, he used the drug as both an analgesic and a preventative measure, spreading the word to fellow sufferers as often as possible.

    Cluster Busters says it believes the key difference between triptans and serotonergic psychedelics is that the receptor targeted by the latter acts as a vasoconstrictor, preventing attacks by keeping the carotid artery from expanding and pressing on the trigeminal nerves.

    Unfortunately, taboos and legal constrictions have made it hard to gauge doses and procure these drugs safely for chronic headache sufferers, but recent persistence and overwhelming anecdotal evidence from Cluster Busters has led to legally approved trials of the drugs for treatment of severe chronic headaches.

    Researchers like Harvard psychiatrist, Dr. John Halpern, decided to look more closely into the stories being reported from Cluster Busters and conduct a study of his own. After interviewing 53 subjects who used a serotonergic psychedelic to treat cluster headaches, he found that 95 percent successfully delayed or completely avoided headaches. This led Halpern to set up future double-blind studies with control groups to properly test results.

    Much like the dose I received from Sean to treat my migraine, the doses used by most cluster headache sufferers are micro-doses, or non-psychedelic doses. Even the slightly larger, preventative doses Wold takes a few times a year , he says, are roughly tantamount to a buzz from a few glasses of wine - enough to make lights look slightly more vivid.

    Another strong proponent who deserves mention for use of psychedelics to treat chronic headaches is Graham Hancock. Hancock says at one point he was suffering from up to 20 severe migraines a month, before he took Ayahuasca and Iboga in shamanic ceremonies.

    Ayauhasca is an Amazonian brew containing DMT, another serotonergic psychedelic found in many plants. Today, after suffering from chronic headaches his entire life, Hancock no longer suffers from them at all, and has vowed to take Ayahuasca two to three times a year to prevent them, and for the spiritual experience it provides.

    Of course, one should tread with caution when considering these drugs for treatment. Wold says it's important to consult a doctor to ensure these psychoactive substances won't react adversely with any other medications one might be on, and to assure that one is healthy enough to take them.

    With any luck, further research into serotonergic psychedelics can help relieve the pain for victims of chronic headaches and eliminate the unwarranted stigma placed on a natural substance with medicinal value. For more information visit the Cluster Busters website or MAPS, another group that continues to achieve funding and legal permission to advance clinical trials studying the healing potential of psychotropic drugs.

    https://www.gaia.com/lp/content/psyc...for-migraines/
    Last edited by mr peabody; 12-02-2019 at 01:45.
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    #40
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    Interesting stuff. Most of my pain is due to muscle tension which is difficult to treat - only meds that work are diazepam (reduces my pain) & strong opiates. IM ketamine does help but only while I'm on it, & I can't easily get more. I've never tried IV but I wonder how that would work differently, seemed to in that one case. I do have RA as well but I'm not sure how much it contributes to my pain. The only med that ever helped it was Vioxx which is no longer available. Lastly I have terrible menstrual cramps. Before I could take ibuprofen (I used to just immediately throw it up), I just suffered through on opiates. But even now that I can take ibuprofen, it's not enough. Hell, even the opiates aren't enough so I just lie in bed.

    Neither THC nor CBD oil has been useful for any of the above. I'm not a big fan of psylocibin, so I wouldn't be will to take that. I haven't done LSD while in pain but it doesn't seem to help doing it occasionally. I do get migraines too but triptans work well for them with minimal side effects.

    If I ever have enough k to use regularly I'll try the IV treatment as described. And I'm definitely interested in ibogaine.
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    #41
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    Hm. I wonder whether inflammation is a factor. You need to rule that out. I have RA myself, and 20mg of Prednisone once daily virtually shuts down inflammation-related pain. It's a miracle drug. Your cramps/other lady issues might also be causing inflammation you are not aware of. The rule of thumb when it comes to pain is always rule out or treat inflammation first. My wife thinks you probably didn't take enough CBD. You need to get/try Rick Simpson's Oil. If you find that helps, making it yourself is the only way to go. I can provide you with precise instructions. Ketamine is great for pain, no question about it, but might not be affordable. Just one more bit of advice I would humbly offer you; sugar is the #1 cause of inflammation. Get your glucose checked, and MAKE SURE you are not diabetic. Not knowing that almost killed me twice.

    peace and love,

    pb
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    #42
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    I do a diet combined with IF that reduces inflammation greatly. Doesn't change my back or period pain though. But I had frequent problems with tendonitis before that are gone now. I was very insulin sensitive to begin with & even more so after 11yrs of this lifestyle. I eat mostly fatty dairy, red meat, & fruit & veg. Rarely any refined or processed things. But I do love fruit and eat 500g grapes & 1-2 apples a day. I'm definitely not diabetic.

    I have been on very high doses of prednisone for as long as 6mo, numerous times. Doesn't help any of my pain. I took it for severe allergic reactions to topical irritants; I will scratch myself until the skin is gone. I should mention I have 3x the number of nerves, at least peripherally, & often respond unusually.

    I didn't try a lot of CBD but even low doses were too sedating for me. I'm far too fatigued as is to add to it further. Ofc my opiates don't help & I often struggle to choose between staying alert & treating my pain.

    I can afford the k if I can get enough.
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    #43
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    Sorry, what is IF? Glad to hear you've got a handle on your "inflammation index." Have you thought about or tried the Teeter for your back pain? My wife swears by that. According to her, for menstrual pain, nothing works as well as RSO. She doesn't seem to notice sedation, and her dosing is way high - so much for different people experiencing different effects.

    By the way, RCs closest to Ketamine are:

    MXE (3-MeO-2-Oxo-PCE) will be the RC closest to ketamine.

    -fireflagknown (reddit)

    ---

    I prefer 2f-ket. It is shorter lasting but feels cleaner and closer to real ket. Duration is 2-3 hours.

    -Mutagenic_pasta (reddit)

    ---

    Methoxmetamine (MXM) is probably the RC closest to ketamine. MXE is superior for me but not much like k.

    -K8hudson1 (reddit)

    ---

    MXE and O-PCE are very similar, and my all time favorite drugs ever that have extreme anti-depressive qualities.

    -RCluminati (reddit)

    ---

    Deschloroketamine (aka O-PCM, DXE, and DCK) is advertised as a ketamine replacement. It's much cheaper. I found it
    to be about 2x more potent than K, and last about twice as long.

    https://www.erowid.org/experiences/exp.php?ID=107008

    -----

    I've heard IV treatments are ridiculously expensive. Where are you located? Lots more information on ketamine (although not pain-specific) in my depression thread here:

    https://www.bluelight.org/vb/threads/856937-Psychedelics-and-depression


    peace and love,

    pb
    Last edited by mr peabody; 13-02-2019 at 01:28.
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    Ann and Alexander Shulgin


    Ketamine in Pain Management*

    Lee C. Chang , Suman Rajagopalan , and Sanjay J. Mathew, Carlos A. Zarate Jr.

    As the use of ketamine as an anesthetic agent grew among practitioners, it was soon discovered that ketamine had additional properties that could benefit patients. As it was known that phencyclidine had analgesic properties, it was therefore hypothesized that ketamine would also have such effects. Research was started by healthcare providers in varying specialties to examine the use of ketamine as a potential treatment for pain management. Although the different pharmaceutical governing bodies have currently not approved the use of ketamine for pain management, the drug is used by practitioners to treat various pain conditions, including cancer pain, chronic pain, and perioperative pain.

    Cancer Pain Management

    Currently, ketamine is used in subanesthetic doses along with opioids to treat cancer pain, especially when opioids alone are ineffective in alleviating pain. Ketamine can be administered orally, intravenously, or subcutaneously for the relief of pain. A Cochrane review evaluating the use of ketamine in the management of cancer pain identified seven randomized control trials (RCTs) and 32 case reports or case series Only two RCTs were included in their analyses that showed an improvement in cancer-related pain when used along with morphine. Of the 32 case reports that were included in the same review, most showed an improvement in pain control when ketamine was used along with morphine. The authors concluded that more RCTs are required to assess the benefits and risks involved with the use of ketamine as an adjuvant to opioids for cancer pain.

    Chronic Pain Therapy

    Ketamine has been successfully used to treat different forms of chronic pain, including the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain, phantom and ischemic limb pain, postherpetic neuralgia, orofacial pain including trigeminal neuralgia, fibromyalgia, and chronic regional pain syndromes. Patients with complex regional pain syndromes who were administered low-dose ketamine infusions exhibited an improvement in pain scores for weeks following the treatment. Following administration of ketamine through an epidural catheter, one case study describes pain relief in a patient suffering from complex regional pain syndrome that was refractory to other treatments. In patients with fibromyalgia, ketamine increased tolerance to pain, decreased pain at tender points, and reduced muscle pain and referred pain. Current data suggest that instead of acting as a traditional analgesic, ketamine may more effectively reduce symptoms of allodynia and hyperalgesia. Younger patients and those with a short duration of pain seem to be more likely to have a positive response to treatment with ketamine. Oral dosing for ketamine has varied widely from 30 to 1000 mg/day, suggesting a wide therapeutic window. While there is sufficient evidence to demonstrate its benefit with short-term use, more studies are needed to establish the long-term effects of ketamine and the dose required for effective treat-ment with minimal side effects.

    Acute Perioperative Pain

    The analgesic effects of ketamine are believed to be, at least in part, due to its effects on central sensitization and neuronal modulation of pain. Low doses of ketamine may have either synergistic or additive analgesic effects when used in combination with opioids for postoperative pain. Ketamine is an effective adjuvant, particularly for upper abdominal, thoracic, and major orthopedic surgeries. The analgesic effect of ketamine does not depend on the type of opioid administered, the dose of ketamine, or the timing of ketamine administration. Administration of ketamine prior to the surgical procedure to determine if there was a decrease in postoperative pain scores or the amount of opioids required has been studied with variable results. Ketamine in small doses has also been added to patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with morphine following thoracic surgery. This combination of morphine-ketamine PCA was found to provide superior analgesia and decrease the requirement of morphine with no increase in the incidence of hallucinations or psychological side effects.

    From the study here: https://www.academia.edu/30709950/Ke...ant_Depression

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