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Cowboy Mac
30-08-2005, 15:41
Club Health 2005 will be held in Sydney at the Rydges Jamison Hotel on 29-30 September. This is one of the few national and international conferences that give user groups, and others dedicated to real harm reduction, a chance to interact with policy makers.

Come see Johnboy, Cowboy Mac, Madmick and DrPlatypus stick it to the man! I'm not really sure what that means, but what I am sure of is that it will all be very entertaining. It begins with:

Club Health: the clubbers experience
madmick, Code Blue, Canberra

And ends with:

If the government won't pay... Peer-Initiated harm reduction in the club drugs world.
Johnboy Davidson, Enlighten, Australia

Pillreports.com V2: facilitating harm reduction worldwide.
Cowboy Mac, Enlighten, Australia.

The next generation of harm minimisation: evidence-based vs. electorate-based drugs policy.
Dr David Caldicott, Emergency Research Fellow, Royal Adelaide Hospital

But it's not just us. There are dozens of other interesting speakers from all around the world. Here is the official blurb:



Rydges Jamison Hotel, Sydney
29-30 September 2005

Previous Club Health conferences in the Netherlands, Italy and Australia have proved successful in attracting international audiences interested in all aspects of nightlife. Furthermore, although a key feature of these conferences is recreational drug use, the wider nightlife focus of Club Health broadens debate to include sexual health, transport, crime, emergency planning and other nighttime safety issues. As a result the conference attracts a wide range of delegates including health practitioners, police, licensing authorities, bar and club owners, environmental health professionals, representatives from the music and travel industries and club-goers themselves. We hope to attract a similar range of delegates to this conference.

Confirmed international speakers include Lisa McDonald from the Royal Institute for Deaf People (RNID), UK who will be speaking on the issue of
clubbing and hearing loss; Aimee Ferraro from the University of Colorado who will discuss the implications of the Rave Act in the USA; and Karen Hughes from John Moores University, Liverpool, UK presenting a paper on clubbing and sexual behaviour.

Australian speakers include Dr Iain McGregor from University of Sydney; Dr Rod Irvine from University of Adelaide, Dr Adam Winstock from South West Area Health Service in Sydney: and Dr David Caldicott from the Royal Adelaide Hospital.

Club Health 2005: Sydney will be held on 29th and 30th September 2005 at the Rydges Jamison in Sydney. A registration form and further details are available at the following weblink:

http://ndarc.med.unsw.edu.au/ndarc.nsf/website/News.conferencelinks

aunty establishment
30-08-2005, 16:23
Hmm, I can't attend but if I chance to be in Sydney on those dates (for work) I'd be staying at that hotel (it's very cooshy!) so I will come and say hi.

TheYellowDart
31-08-2005, 04:03
Looks very interesting. I'd go but it comes with a pretty hefty price tag at $350.

If anybody feels like sponsoring me, I'm up for it :D

Especially interested in the speeches on the RAVE Act, Evidence v Electorate Based Drug Policy and Clubbing & Hearing Loss.

I think hearing loss is a serious safety issue that many people don't consider when at an event. I often bring ear plugs with me and tend to stay towards the back because I've already damaged my hearing fairly badly and don't want it to get worse. I'm concious of it almost all the time when I'm out, but nobody else seems to even consider the health implications of the environment they are placing themselves in.

Cowboy Mac
31-08-2005, 04:55
Originally posted by aunty establishment
Hmm, I can't attend but if I chance to be in Sydney on those dates (for work) I'd be staying at that hotel (it's very cooshy!) so I will come and say hi.
please do!

Originally posted by TheYellowDart
Looks very interesting. I'd go but it comes with a pretty hefty price tag at $350.
These kind of things are always pricey but there may be a student price that is lower than $350. What do you think would be a fair price to pay for two days of presentations and lunch supplied? You should email Paul Dillon from NDARC and voice your opinion; you want to go but it is costly.

Faustus
31-08-2005, 06:24
Sent an email to Paul Dillion myself. Prob end up going.

mibrane
31-08-2005, 08:32
Originally posted by Cowboy Mac
These kind of things are always pricey but there may be a student price that is lower than $350. What do you think would be a fair price to pay for two days of presentations and lunch supplied?

I would say, what one can afford. Many organisations/ unis etc can afford that sort of price tag, but there is no question that Club Health is infinitely more valuable when there is a user presence -, as there was in Melbourne last year - some of those will come from orgs and unis, but lots don't and that sort of figure is heaps too high. by allowing a number of subsidised/ or free regos those who are paying full price are going to get lots more out of it than if a heap of academics sit around going "so what actually goes on at these raves?", or industry reps sitting around going "fuck, i had a big one last night, anyone got any panadol" (which from all reports seemed to be the discussion level at Netherlands and Italy Clubs Health); aivl had to really fight to get a user plenary and subsidised regos, and everyone who had a point of comparison said the conference was heaps better for it.
So put the hard word on Paul, NDARC can afford it!

phase_dancer
31-08-2005, 09:29
I agree. I feel we could contribute quite a bit to this conference, but as we as a group no longer receive any government funding, attending is pretty well out of the question for us Queenslanders. All I can say is that 6 years of unpublished, comprehensive intervention data can't be considered to be worth much 8)

aunty establishment
31-08-2005, 10:06
$350 is really very inexpensive for a two day conference. I'm about to pay $700 US out of my own pocket to attend a four-dayer and it's not going to be anywhere near as fun as watching Johnboy make people look stupid =D

p_d, it's a bloody shame you can't get funding to attend. Really pisses me off that there's so much inequality across the different HR orgs in Aus :(

phase_dancer
31-08-2005, 10:41
If you knew the half of it. While some intermediate parties have made an outstanding effort to establish a workable relationship with state officials on our behalf, there's an undercurrent of coerciveness within the department that contradicts the very philosophy behind the RaveSafe concept. Even if we were still backed by an official body, in all honesty I'd be the last person they'd want to send to such a conference.

I believe in sticking to principles, not kissing arse and giving in to demands from those who know nothing about the scene and who ignore epidemiological studies or simply wouldn't/ couldn't consider ruffling dept feathers for fear of their own future. Anyway, I'm just too outspoken on issues such as testing and government policy, and with the data to back it up, such outspokenness becomes very unsettling for those who stand to lose the most by bad or awkward media publicity. Call me jaded if you like; jaded with local bad policy makers :|

If I did attend it would be on my own back, but with the time I have free over the next 2 months and a current less than optimal income, I can't see myself forking out for yet another expense related to the cause. Sooner or later, you have to dedicate your time to those around you who love you and to projects that support them. You know family and bacon and home and stuff... In that respect, my time in Harm Reduction related volunteer work is steadily drawing towards a close :(

Fry-d-
31-08-2005, 11:02
Sounds like it would be an interesting event to attend. Now if only I wasn't on the wrong side of the country :p

aunty establishment
31-08-2005, 11:33
Originally posted by phase_dancer
...in all honesty I'd be the last person they'd want to send to such a conference.

I believe in sticking to principles, not kissing arse and giving in to demands from those who know nothing about the scene and who ignore epidemiological studies or simply wouldn't/ couldn't consider ruffling dept feathers for fear of their own future. Anyway, I'm just too outspoken on issues such as testing and government policy, and with the data to back it up, such outspokenness becomes very unsettling for those who stand to lose the most by bad or awkward media publicity. Call me jaded if you like; jaded with local bad policy makers :|
...no, I'd call you a scholar, by the classical definition, which makes you exactly the kind of person who *should* be attending. Still, I can understand why you wouldn't want to spend money to attend. You shouldn't have to. Let's just say there are a lot of things about the HR world in Aus that I don't understand and that underpinned my decision not to take that career path.

madmick19
01-09-2005, 14:16
heya phase dancer ill chip in $75 towards your ticket if you decide to go, since im getting in for my presentation its the least i can do for such a well respected HR advocate:)

phase_dancer
02-09-2005, 05:09
That's very kind of you Mick. However, I'll have to get back to you on this. As I mentioned, at this late stage of things, there's a quite a few commitments already made. At the very best, I'd have no time to prepare anything (although I did at one time have a topic in mind).

Once again, thanks heaps for the offer and words of support. That goes for you too aunty. I wonder how many of the best HR coal face workers have bailed out for similar reasons.

ruski
09-09-2005, 04:36
I may also look to go up w/Mac + JB.

Be good to see Enlightens new baby (PR.com) released to the wider audience at Club Health, Mac will be like Steve Jobs releasing the new Ipod Nano to thousands of hungry music lovers :)

notneo
09-09-2005, 07:23
p_d if you had a topic ready to go and did want to attend but couldnt for financial reasons or because you didnt believe you should have to, i'm sure many bl'ers would chip in for you.

Sometimes you just have to meet the dickheads half way and swallow some pride... but if not I'd contribute :) I believe in HR and getting our point out in public but it's just not my thing to do it personally.

aunty establishment
09-09-2005, 09:59
Yay - I've just found out that I'm going to be in Sydney on those days (at that hotel) after all. Can we arrange a meetup on the Thursday night perhaps? It would be great to catch up with y'all, and meet a few new faces. It'd be even more great if I could attend some of the sessions but no can do - lousy job, always expecting me to show up ;)

phase_dancer
09-09-2005, 10:56
Thanks to all for the kind offers, both here and via PM.

johnboy
13-09-2005, 14:51
There's a whole social program, organised by myself and Buck Reed. Details, as well as the abstracts for every talk, are here (http://ndarc.med.unsw.edu.au/ndarc.nsf/c2fabb74f3f54c22ca256afc00097c53/11e0a91dc4f6d35fca256caa000c6b1e/$FILE/FINAL%20CLUB%20HEALTH%20WEB%20PROGRAM.pdf)

phase_dancer
14-09-2005, 04:12
Great program

MooShiE
14-09-2005, 06:55
This sounds really awesome! The price tag is rather hefty!

Will something like this be held in other states around Australia???

I dont see why only Sydney should get all this kinda information!!!!

aunty establishment
15-09-2005, 04:04
^ The inaugural Club Health conference was held in Melbourne last year, so I presume there's the intent to vary the location each year.

johnboy - I'm unable to attend the conference during the days due to work committments, but it'd be great to come to the social program and catch up with you all. Am I allowed to join you on Thursday night?

Cowboy Mac
15-09-2005, 05:05
Originally posted by aunty establishment
^ The inaugural Club Health conference was held in Melbourne last year, so I presume there's the intent to vary the location each year.
That was the International Club Health conference, whereas this is the inaugeral national conference.

johnboy
15-09-2005, 11:46
aunty - but of course. just call Buck's mobile (the number is in the program) to find out where we are.

aunty establishment
15-09-2005, 16:34
Originally posted by Cowboy Mac
That was the International Club Health conference, whereas this is the inaugeral national conference.
My mistake! So, this will be an annual event? And where will it be held?

johnboy: thanks! Looking forward to catching up.

johnboy
16-09-2005, 09:57
So, this will be an annual event? And where will it be held?

That all depends on how this one goes.

TheYellowDart
27-09-2005, 05:51
BUMP

This is in 2 days people. Anybody interested in FREE TICKETS should contact johnboy ([email protected]). There are only 10 available (see this thread (http://www.bluelight.ru/vb/showthread.php?s=&threadid=223462&r=1) for more information).

Juvenile
29-09-2005, 12:57
Just listening to hack on jjj then. Major props to John Boy ! 50k for a ion scanner wow! awesome indeed. I imagine we'll hear more of this in this thread.

Fry-d-
29-09-2005, 13:14
That is indeed a big scoop for the Hack team there isn't it. Releasing details of enlightens fancy new ion scanner which will allow them to give accurate results on contents of pills without coming into contact with them. Was that information suppose to be leaked before you guys revealed it tomorrow?

Great stuff JB and the enlighten team, can't wait to hear how the whole conference goes for you all. Hopefully you guys get pillreports released in time to show it off.

Good stuff :)

shorza
29-09-2005, 17:22
Well done and good luck.

shorza
01-10-2005, 19:01
So....?

How did it go?

What's the goss?

johnboy
02-10-2005, 04:53
If I get a chance I'll do a report later today. Very tired. So much happened, and most of it very good.

Cowboy Mac
02-10-2005, 04:58
Apparently channel 9 news only played the story in Sydney (or decided not to play it?). Enlighten has the funds to purchase an Ion Scanner, using the same technology that customs uses at airports. The model we will be using over summer will be the Sabre 4000 (http://www.sensir.com/Smiths/Sabre/Sabre.htm) which is a handheld compact model weighing only a few kilograms:

http://www.sensir.com/Smiths/Sabre/Saber-4000.jpg

This opens up a world of opportunity when combining results with a wireless internet connection and uploading them instantly to pillreports. For example we can now provide local hospitals and on site medicos with very accurate information on what is contained within the pills someone might have had, without waiting for a toxicology report. This will put Enlighten as a world leader in the field, and probably the only ones using Ion Scanning technology in the world in this way.

We can increase the database of known substances, so we will have the most common adulterants and be able to detect them. We've been working hard in stealth mode since the start of the year to get this off the ground, and it is fantasic to see that it has all happened. Expect to hear more about this later this summer.

Psychadelic_Paisly
02-10-2005, 05:38
holy crap! that's awesome guys!!! Enlighten, the forefront of Harm Reduction!!!

keep up the good work. One day when I have money I just may donate some extra cash ;)

hoptis
02-10-2005, 06:27
The mortgage repayments start next month, every Bluelighter is expected to put in $50 a month towards the repayments. Thanks ;)

Great news guys.

potato
02-10-2005, 07:16
WOW! that's truly awesome. You guys are inspiring. Keep ut the great work.

Splatt
02-10-2005, 07:25
Truly awesome.... Really impressed

johnboy
02-10-2005, 10:00
Here is my talk. I adlibbed a fair bit as well but this gives you a good idea. I am going to get Mac and David to put their talks up as well.

--------------

Hello my name is John Davidson and I am the spokesperson for, and along with Mac, am one of the founding members of, Enlighten.

I'd like to begin by thanking Paul Dillon for inviting us to speak at this conference, as well as the international one last year. Paul, and NDARC, have been tireless in their effort to bring together all the stakeholders in this field.

The divide between those that do the drugs and those who profess to work for them, has been growing under this current government, and although there are a few brave individuals and organisations that have been working to fix this, there is still a great deal of work to do. This, I believe, is the theme of this last session.

SLIDE

Enlighten is an all volunteer pill testing, harm reduction and peer education group based in Melbourne, and we have been testing at events in Victoria for almost 5 years now, and in South Australia for the last three. Pill testing is arguably one of the most effective harm reduction tools available in the area of club drugs. Not just for the immediate information that can be supplied to drug users, giving them the opportunity to make informed decisions, but it is also one of the few ways of having users come to us, rather than simply throwing messages out into the media.

Enlighten exists because of a demand, a demand for information and advice. That demand exists. But the opportunity to supply this demand is being missed by the mainstream drug services.

I am not going to be making the case for pill testing here today, mostly because I have a lot to cover but also because there seems little point. SLIDE

At the last Club Health conference in Melbourne I spoke about this, but more importantly we heard from experts such as Dirk Korf, Jaap Jamin and Manuela Shmundt who all presented papers based on their research with various European pill testing groups over the last ten years. I urge anyone who is interested to download them from the Club Health website, particularly Dirk Korf's paper in which he presented his findings that pill testing can actually have a substantial demand reduction effect.

A couple of months after being presented with this compelling evidence, the Victorian Health department issued its recommendation that pill testing should not be considered, and went as far as to call for the banning of reagent kits. The only paper referenced was Dr Adam Winstock's from 2000, possibly because the findings of that paper, which was based on the responses of people who had not been exposed to pill testing and were only answering hypothetical questions, aligned with their prejudices.

In May of this year the Ministerial Council on Drug Strategy issued their joint communiqué stating “that they could not endorse the development or use of drug testing kits for personal use in the light of the lack of evidence that they will lead to any net reduction in the harm caused by drugs.”

They based this finding on a report from a Special Working Group. I have no idea what was in this report. I certainly wasn’t asked to make a submission to it. And when I asked the council for a copy of this report I was told, SLIDE “all MCDS agendas, papers, reports and resolutions are confidential to persons and organizations represented at MCDS meetings. Discussion at MCDS meetings is also confidential and is not recorded electronically or in writing.”

Decisions are made behind closed doors, from secret evidence and no records are kept. What a sad state of affairs.

But around that time we heard that there has been some cause for optimism. We heard through the grapevine that a certain state health department, I won’t say which one, was about to spend some money on the issue of pill testing. The figure mentioned was SLIDE $50,000. Now to us that was an incredible sum. In Enlighten's existence we would not have spent a tenth of that amount. Real harm reduction is a very cost effective venture.

Our excitement quickly disappeared when we found out how the government intended to spend this money.

A poster. This isn't it really. It's a mock-up, because to the best of my knowledge the real poster hasn't seen the light of day. It may be sitting in a Minister's in tray, waiting their signature, or the whole project may have been scrapped. But this is the message the poster was designed to impress upon the public.

SLIDE “Don't use pill testing kits because they are not 100% accurate”

SLIDE Translation? Just say no to drugs. The government's total investment in the issue of pill testing is $50,000 on a poster that is actually a demand reduction effort. This is not harm reduction. Let's make that clear.

SLIDE We know reagent-testing kits are not 100% accurate. We have always been the first to say it. But what we have also said is that there are now alternatives to reagent testing that are, in fact, 100% accurate. The only thing that has held us back from acquiring this technology has been the cost.

Only a couple of years ago, when we began investigating this technology, we estimated that we would need up to $100,000 to purchase a portable testing solution. But the technology is advancing at a rapid pace, and the costs are dropping just as quickly. We asked ourselves; if all the government can think to do with $50,000 is make a poster saying that there is a problem (test kits are inaccurate), could we solve that problem?

So we raised that money, and a lot quicker than even I thought possible. Keep in mind that because Enlighten's central activity is illegal we cannot apply for any conventional funding, nor can we apply for the tax-exempt status, which would make getting donations a lot easier.

But, regardless, the donations flooded in. So where did it come from? The user base of ecstasy in Australia is massive. SLIDE The Australian Crime Commission's 2003-2004 report states that “more than a quarter of all men aged 20-29 had used it, including 15 per cent in the past year.” This is a very large, and an increasingly neglected part of society. And the more the government ignores them, or if they’re lucky, patronises them, the more pissed off and militant they become.

About the time we began fund raising the government rolled out yet another alarmist advertising campaign. It has to be asked: how many million dollars have been spent on these ads over the last 10 years? And have they had any effect? SLIDE “In 1995, just 1.1 per cent of all males surveyed had used ecstasy in the previous year. That number had quadrupled to 4.4 per cent last year.? (ACC)

And yet we continue to fund these demand reduction ads and give relatively nothing to harm reduction efforts. I'm not even going to touch on the 100's of millions spent on supply reduction, with little effect on the supply. In light of this is wasn't too hard to make the pitch that for a comparatively small amount of money we could actually achieve something; real harm reduction. Again there is a demand. And if we are to believe the prophets of the new economy, markets will always rise to meet such demands, and there is no need for governments to interfere. Our government, however, probably won't see it that way.

Over the last six months we have been researching the various options open to us.


The bench mark for laboratory testing of ecstasy has always been the GC/MS:

SLIDE SLIDE SLIDE

(ad lib about Sabre 4000. I'll put up some detail on it later.)

Accuracy is now achievable. Immediate and accurate results will be available to users, to help them make decisions about their use. And, most importantly, that information will be in a form that can be shared and help inform the decisions of many others.

SLIDE One of the main reasons we have been attracted to the Smith's devices has been the ability to export the data to a laptop. We began planning this project with the concept of immediate uploading of results to the internet. Mac will be going into more technical detail about our online strategies and technology but I need to emphasise how important is the timely sharing of this information.

One of the plans the government talks about is the idea of sharing the pill testing data gathered by police forensics labs with the emergency departments of hospitals. To the best of my knowledge this plan is still only that, a plan, and has not yet been put into place anywhere. This seems, on the face of it, a good idea. However it completely misses what I was taught was the point public health: Prevention is better than cure.

Shouldn't we be making sure that people aren't being admitted to hospitals because of adulterated pill? Why are we only responding to the problem once it has already happened?

But let's put that aside for the moment. That's a whole 'nother talk.

Suppose that we can only use pill testing data after the fact. What data are we using? The police data is, by its very nature, not indicative of what is available on the street. This data comes from seizures, big and small. They only test pills which have didn't make it to the dealer. But even supposing they do get an accurate cross sample, they have such a back log of testing to be done that six to nine months could go by before a potentially dangerous pill is noticed.

Surely testing pills at major events, where people are eager to hand them in, makes more sense? We can have the results up online within six to nine minutes. And we are going to. This summer we will be uploading the data we collect at major events to our website, making it instantly available to hospitals and medical professionals working in the area of those events.

SLIDE

The debate had changed. Every last one of the talking points that our opposition has used dismiss pilltesting are now irrelevant. Except the one they won't discuss. But I will get to that.

Talking Point One: “Pil testing will encourage drug use”

As we have seen, both at this conference and the last one, there is a great deal of evidence that this is false. Dirk Krof's paper shows how those who pill test use on average less than those who don't. And of those who do not take ecstasy, those who are exposed to pill testing are far less likely to start.

Talking Point Two: “Pilltesting is not accurate”.

Now it is.

Talking Point Three: “Pill testing is illegal”.

With the Ionscanner, as it is so sensitive, we can test pills without ever having to touch them, or even see them. To test we need to have the pills owner touch the pill very lightly with a wooden applicator or toothpick and then touch that against a paper swab. This does not have to happen in our presence. And once the swab is handed to us the active material may only be a billionth of a gram. We cannot be prosecutred for such microscopic amounts.

And that also covers Talking Point Four: “You hand the pill back!”. Nope. May not even see it. Ideally we would prefer not to have to go to this level of hands off, as although we could also automate the process of scanning images and recording size, it would be a lot easier if we could directly assist the people having their pills tested.

If the government is willing to allow a trial under those conditions then we are willing to compromise.

But what we are not willing to do is let the government get away with either ducking this debate entirely, or falling back on these now irrelevant talking points. We will just have to see if they are willing to have this issue aired again, because it will take a lot more bravery than I believe they have for them to discuss their only remaining objection; the moral one.

That is all they have left. And are the really going to see if they wil honestly state their policy, that drug users are bad people, sinners, and that to help them is fundamentally wrong.

Anyway, while they are working that one out, we'll be testing. Thank you.

madmick19
02-10-2005, 11:34
heya guys back in canb now and seems that every thing from the last few days is sinking in,

i am very impressed how the last day went especially with the unvailing of the ion scanner in your talk jb followed by macs presentation on pillreports and how the Sabre will allow medical services more real time information than they have been able to attain before........

big props to enlighten indeed.........

stealing a line from another that was at the conference " after hearing dr caldicott's closing presentation i felt like making up a placard and marching" with the way the conference ended i think there is no way that the government will be able to sit on its hands any more ........

it'll be forced to act mainly due to the last three presentations of the day..


good work guys :)

madmick19
02-10-2005, 11:39
ps it was good to catch up with those i know and to meet new ppl like cowboy mac,buck, danny from ravesafe vic, dr caldicott ( this man is tops) and the guys from adelaide and fiinally to the guys from new zealand who made friday night at home interesting indeed ;) :)

Psychadelic_Paisly
02-10-2005, 11:44
^^^ Great speach. Bravo and kudo's to you all. What you're doing takes A LOT of guts. I look forward to reading the other two pieces.
Are you able to provide speaches from the other side of the fence at all?

BigTrancer
02-10-2005, 16:28
Great work jb :)

buck_reed
02-10-2005, 22:10
Well, I have now survived Club Health back to back with Parklife 7. It was great to catch up with everyone, especially during the social program.

I hope those who came enjoyed checking out home....which may feature more widely in future Club Health experiences.

and thanks for everyone who came to all of my presentations, although I think that "Effects of Alcohol on Club Health Social program Attendees" was clearly the favourite.

Cheers,

Buck

Fry-d-
03-10-2005, 03:21
Great stuff from all who contributed :)

madmick19
03-10-2005, 03:46
oh yeah sorry buck i forgot to thankyou for that, mabey you should post it up here....... any how ill see you at digweed champ :)

peaked
03-10-2005, 10:48
Thats great news about the ion scanner! :) I'll definately have to get my stuff checked whenever enlighten are in SA. On the topic of the scanner, im curious, just how powerful is it? Will it be able to differentiate between for example mdma/mda/mdea? Can it determine if there are any impurities from the manufacture? Would it be able to determine any of the active quantities?

johnboy
03-10-2005, 11:08
Will it be able to differentiate between for example mdma/mda/mdea?

Yes.


Can it determine if there are any impurities from the manufacture?

Yes, so long as we tell it to. It only looks for what we program it to. We hope to be able to put some common impurities in.


Would it be able to determine any of the active quantities?

No. We may be able to tell the ratio of active ingrediants, but this isn't clear yet.

peaked
03-10-2005, 11:28
Cheers JB. This will certainly be a huge step forward for harm minimisation in this country. Great work enlighten! :)

johnboy
03-10-2005, 11:43
Are you able to provide speaches from the other side of the fence at all?

Not really. They will end up online eventually I guess. Last year's are worth a read if you are interested:

http://www.clubhealth.org.uk/pages/2004.htm

cuddlefish
06-10-2005, 13:04
Absolutely top work JB, Mac, buck_reed and madmick19!

Great news about the ion scanner. Hope to hear some results of it's application soon. Well done for having the courage of your convictions and getting Enlighten up and running as a truly powerful force. Time for another donation drive?

The boy and I would have liked to go, but only found out this was all happening a couple of days before hand. Glad we were so well represented!

(cameo)Smiley:)

Cowboy Mac
06-10-2005, 17:46
^^ I think another donation drive might be on the cards to assist with costs we are likely to incur over summer and with the recent development costs of pillreports. It will be a very interested summer with the new toys though!