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Thread: World's oldest-known animal cave art painted at least 40,000 years ago in Borneo

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    World's oldest-known animal cave art painted at least 40,000 years ago in Borneo 
    #1
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    swilow's Avatar
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    Might shift to Science & Tech but thought it might be interesting for some to read at least. Cave art fascinates me, what I have seen in northern and western Australia had such incredible impact . . .

    World's oldest-known animal cave art painted at least 40,000 years ago in Borneo



    • Key points:
    • A number of caves in the Indonesian province of Kalimantan contain thousands rock art images of animals, hand stencils and symbols
    • Sophisticated dating of the paintings shows the earliest paintings were created at least 40,000-52,000 years ago
    • Paintings shifted from animals to humans at the peak of the Ice Age between 20,000-21,000 years ago


    We have no idea who painted a large red animal on the walls of a remote cave in Borneo at least 40,000 years ago, but their work is the oldest-known example of figurative rock art in the world, according to new research.

    The painting possibly depicts a species of wild cattle known as a banteng.

    And it was created at least 5,000 years earlier than animal paintings on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi and caves in France, which until now were thought to be the oldest examples of this kind of rock art.

    The Borneo banteng is part of a panel of rock art that includes hand stencils thought to be at least 37,500 years old, a team of Australian and Indonesian scientists reports today in the journal Nature.

    The new dates suggest figurative rock art depicting the natural world evolved in different parts of the world at roughly the same time, said Maxime Aubert, an archaeologist and geochemist from Griffith University.

    "We know that modern humans arrived [around 40,000 years ago] in Europe, but they were in South-East Asia at least 20,000 years before that and also Australia," Dr Aubert said.

    "It gives us an idea of how art may have developed through time."

    Dr Aubert and his colleagues dated rock art from several caves in rugged limestone outcrops, in the Indonesian province of Kalimantan on the eastern side of Borneo.

    The caves are known to contain thousands of images of animals such as banteng and the extinct tapir, as well as hand stencils and symbols.

    The team used techniques that detect uranium and thorium levels to gauge when layers of calcium carbonate were deposited under and over paintings, to give them maximum and minimum dates.

    "There's actually three different phases of cave art," Dr Aubert said.

    The oldest phase includes red and orange-coloured pigments used to depict large animals and create hand stencils.
    -read on . . .
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    #2
    Bluelighter LucidSDreamr's Avatar
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    Thanks. I love hearing about every phase of human evolution from self replicating molecules through present day ..although the older stuff like this is most interesting
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    #3
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    Good article. Thanks for sharing.
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    #4
    Bluelighter zephyr's Avatar
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    Hope it is protected.
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    #5
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    One of the weird puzzles I've always been fascinated about is that while we know Homo Sapiens is pretty old - 200,000 years or so, at least,

    Yet as far as we have uncovered, humans start acting more "modern" around 50,000 years ago, and we start to see what you'd expect from a human society - art, ritualized burial, and multiple cultures. Before that time, the examples are dubious, and we don't have an example of a population engaging in most or all of these traits.

    Somehow, we ate from the tree of knowledge around that time.
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    #6
    Bluelighter LucidSDreamr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Escher's Waterfall View Post
    One of the weird puzzles I've always been fascinated about is that while we know Homo Sapiens is pretty old - 200,000 years or so, at least,

    Yet as far as we have uncovered, humans start acting more "modern" around 50,000 years ago, and we start to see what you'd expect from a human society - art, ritualized burial, and multiple cultures. Before that time, the examples are dubious, and we don't have an example of a population engaging in most or all of these traits.

    Somehow, we ate from the tree of knowledge around that time.
    or...
    https://steemitimages.com/0x0/http:/...720/aliens.jpg

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    #7
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    We got uplifted!
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