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    #26
    Bluelighter mr peabody's Avatar
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    Microdosing LSD for ADHD

    Mike was diagnosed with ADHD at only 7 years old: "I remember very vividly being told that I had ADHD; sitting on my bed as my mom broke the news." He describes his ADHD symptoms as 'a mix of impulsivity with lack of mindfulness, an inability to focus on one thought; it can be very difficult to do anything.'

    He was prescribed Ritalin, and remained on medication until he was 16. It was when a friend described how he lost his personality every time he took Concerta that he decided to leave the medication behind. Ultimately, he preferred his ADHD symptoms over being an identity-free zombie.

    Mike found himself back on medication at 22 after struggling to find focus at college. After several years of switching between Adderall and Vyvanse, he ran into problems. "That was when my tolerance went through the roof. I briefly decided to attain a second script because I thought I needed more amphetamines."

    It was at this crisis point that Mike found himself at the Golden Gate Park, taking 110ug of LSD, with a group of close friends. It was an experience that changed his life. "I have a firm belief that my first dose of LSD cured me of the hyperactivity of ADHD. Somehow it allowed me to take control of my uncontrollable symptoms."

    "I realized that I had so much more control over myself, my thoughts, my physicality, my movements, my emotions, everything was slowed down and kept my focus. I was able to follow a single thought for longer than I had before. With ADHD I could hardly stay with one thought, let alone finish it out and reflect on it later. I was able to do this throughout the entire trip."

    Having experienced a clear perspective on his ADHD for the first time, Mike began microdosing, taking less than a tenth of a Golden Gate Park dose, allowing him to reconnect to the feelings of focus and calm hed experienced back then:

    "I have been microdosing since November 2016. Most of the time I am microdosing 8-10ug every other day. It works for me and I never feel faded or tired or worn out."

    "As well as allowing me to control my ADHD, microdosing gives me increased feelings of joy, energy, focus, and an overall better attitude towards not only others around me, but a better attitude towards myself and who I am."

    "Compared to amphetamines, microdosing is a world apart," says Mike. "The ups and downs of those medicines can be exhausting and ineffective after a certain point. "Microdosing allows me to use my brain the way I want to, I can explore single thoughts one at a time, and I don't need to worry about tolerance or the unpleasant come-down of amphetamines."

    Mike says microdosing has allowed him to wean off amphetamines altogether. He can function in his busy life, building relationships with customers and developing new business. And he can focus on his own life without feeling like a slave to pharmaceuticals.

    "I'd recommend microdosing to anyone with ADHD who is desperate to get free of amphetamines," he told me. "Although I've accepted that medications are a part of my life, and will be for the foreseeable future, microdosing is a medication that helps me accept myself for who I am, rather than dulling my identity."

    I soon came across another adult ADHD sufferer shortly after my meeting with Mike. Also diagnosed with ADHD at a young age, Marcel was happy to share his story in hopes of helping others in his position.

    Marcel, a mechanical engineer, describes his ADHD in a similar way to Mike. He finds it extremely hard to concentrate on one thought, which severely hampers his education and causes him to miss countless appointments, deadlines, and job opportunities. He took Ritalin for a decade, which somewhat helped his concentration and anxiety, although its significantly diminishing returns led him to quit the drug.

    It was a radio feature that tuned Marcel in to the idea of microdosing. After only a few weeks of microdosing the LSD analogue 1P-LSD, he decided it was for him. "Microdosing not only lightened my mood," he said, "it also helped me develop better self control. Those tiny paper snips surprisingly strengthened my sanity and wisdom." Marcel decided to stock up on a long-term supply of microdoses.

    For a year and a half, Marcel has been microdosing with 1P-LSD daily. But it's not all smooth sailing. Marcel emphasizes that microdosing can be a powerful catalyst for change; as long as you are willing to do some work yourself. "I recognize this after microdosing for a fairly long time now. Without continued effort, the brain will regress into defunct patterns. Microdosing, without being a miracle cure, creates enormous room for growth. Yet it is still up to oneself to cultivate better life skills."

    We don't recommend microdosing every day. Jim Fadimans microdosing protocol leaves two days between doses, to defend against tolerance build-up.

    Do the benefits depend on having experienced a full-size dose, similar to that which introduced Mike to microdosing? Marcel doesn't think so: "A couple of friends from my local ADHD support group with whom I shared microdoses report distinctive subjective improvements, nearly all of them without any previous exposure to psychedelic substances. I actually do think microdosing is an effective therapy option in and of itself, without requiring a full-strength psychedelic trip."

    In a short space of time, I'd come across 2 people with evocative stories about the life-changing effects of microdosing. Imagine how many ADHD microdosers are out there, gradually leaving behind the bottles of Ritalin and breaking free from the amphetamine tolerance. In the preliminary results of James Fadiman's recent microdosing study, his team suggests that around 31% of microdosers are self-treating adult ADD/ADHD. This is nearly as many as those microdosing to treat depression.

    Pharmaceutical companies take notice: people with ADHD are looking for something that will help them battle their own symptoms without numbing their identity. Microdosing is giving them that chance at healing without the cost, side-effects, or impracticalities of prescription amphetamines.

    People like Mike and Marcel are only just beginning to come to the forefront of the microdosing movement. We could be witnessing the start of a paradigm shift in mental health treatment, all thanks to tiny strips of paper imbued with mind-opening molecules.

    https://thethirdwave.co/microdosing-adhd/
    Last edited by mr peabody; 16-10-2018 at 23:20.
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    #27
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    ADHD and microdosing psilocybin, a 2-month review

    I take around 200mg of ground up capsulated mazatepec mushrooms every monday and thursday. This schedule has varied a little but twice a week has more or less been constant (except for when I was sick). Here's some observations.

    The good:

    My focus has increased massively. Either I get less distracted or if I get distracted I get aware of it more or less instantly and it allows me to refocus. Like literally, I feel almost no urge to take ritalin or anything else I get prescribed from my psychiatrist.

    I think I'm happier.

    I'm surely more mindful about myself. I tend to notice my moods much better and this in turns allows me to "do something about it".

    In the past I've had a lot of situations where bad memories haunted me (you know, that stupid thing I did in fifth grade) and beat myself up about it. I now manage to simply "forgive" myself. I think of something like that and just joyfully tell myself "Well, you were young / anxious / nervous / whatever, it's ok!"

    I think I laugh more, cry more, just generally open up much more, emotionally.

    Sex hasn't been better. Where in the past I often struggled to focus and my mind just wandered all over the place even when I was having sex. Now i can actually just be "there".

    Being in the present is awesome. It happens to me all the time.

    The not so good:

    Sleep on the day I take it tends to be less good than normal. I dream more and I feel less refreshed the next day. Sometimes I have a lot of trouble sleeping, too.

    I'm not sure if I just notice it more or whether it's the dose but I have been feeling more tense lately. More muscular problems. Neck and Facial muscle pain from grinding my teeth at night. I had this in the past but it seems to have increased. Or I just notice it. I'd love for somebody to comment on this thing in particular.

    Getting the dose right is not so easy. I've had slight "overdoses" as in "more than sub-perceptual" and i've had "underdoses", meaning it didn't do much. Tips on getting this managed better are appreciated.

    "Feeling more" has also somtimes increased Social Anxiety. I've noticed I was super nervous in front of people I do business with. Nothing too bad came out of it but it certainly didn't calm me down.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/microdosing..._a_two_months/
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    #28
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    Attention deficit disorders could stem from impaired brain coordination


    Researchers uncover link absent between brain regions in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia

    Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and colleagues have discovered how two brain regions work together to maintain attention, and how discordance between the regions could lead to attention deficit disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression.

    People with attention deficits have difficulty focusing and often display compulsive behavior. The new study suggests these symptoms could be due to dysfunction in a gene -- ErbB4 -- that helps different brain regions communicate. The gene is a known risk factor for psychiatric disorders, and is required to maintain healthy neurotransmitter levels in the brain.

    In a study published in the current issue of Neuron, researchers showed mice lacking ErbB4 activity in specific brain regions performed poorly on timed attention tasks. The mice struggled to pay attention and remember visual cues associated with food. Neuroscientists describe the kind of thought-driven attention required for the tasks as "top-down attention." Top-down attention is goal-oriented, and related to focus. People who lack efficient top-down attention are at a higher risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The study is the first to connect ErbB4 to top-down attention.

    "The results reveal a mechanism for top-down attention, which could go wrong in attention disorders," says corresponding author Lin Mei, PhD, professor and chair of the department of neurosciences at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "And since ErbB4 is a risk factor for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression, the results provide insights into mechanisms of these disorders."

    When the researchers attached probes to the mice to measure brain activity, they found mice without ErbB4 had brain regions that were acting independently, rather than together in synchrony. In particular, the researchers studied the prefrontal cortex -- normally associated with decision-making -- and the hippocampus -- a region that supports memory. These two regions coordinate for a variety of brain tasks, including memory and attention. "We found top-down attention, previously thought to be controlled by the prefrontal cortex, also involves the hippocampus in a manner where the two regions are highly synchronized when attention is high," says Mei. "Our findings give importance to synchrony between the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in top-down attention and open up the possibility that attention deficit disorders, like ADHD, might involve impairments in the synchrony between these two regions."

    According to the new study, ErbB4 coordinates a cascade of brain signals that "bridge" the two regions. ErbB4 itself encodes a receptor found on the surface of brain cells. The study found that when a protein (neuregulin-1) attaches to the ErbB4 receptor, it triggers a chain reaction that ultimately determines neurotransmitter levels in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Without ErbB4, neurotransmitter levels go awry. The researchers discovered mice lacking ErbB4 have low levels of a particular neurotransmitter -- GABA, or gamma-aminobutyric acid -- in their brain. Low GABA levels can lead to impaired top-down attention in the prefrontal cortex, and impairs how the prefrontal cortex can efficiently coordinate with the hippocampus. The researchers concluded that ErbB4 helps link the two brain regions to maintain attention.

    The study used a novel mouse model to study brain functions. By using genetic and chemical techniques, Mei's team can specifically inhibit ErbB4 in a specific brain region. "We generated a mutant mouse that enables us to inhibit ErbB4 activity whenever and wherever we want, thus allowing temporal and spatial control of ErbB4 activity," says Mei. "This positions us to understand how different brain regions and their neurotransmitter activity regulate various brain functions." The researchers are planning to use the novel mouse model to study how ErbB4 may coordinate brain activities, in an effort to learn more about mechanisms behind attention deficit disorders.

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0405150050.htm
    Last edited by mr peabody; 16-10-2018 at 11:47.
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    #29
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    Memantine has obliterated my depression and social anxiety

    Hey all, just wanted to briefly share my experience here. I have ADHD, best described as the "Ring of Fire" subtype if you buy into the Amen Clinics' categorizations. Mine comes with all the core features, along with anger, 'mood swings', brain fog, depression and anxiety, including terrible social anxiety making eye contact a painful experience.

    I've been on Namenda (memantine) for about a month and a half; I've been on Namenda XR 21 mg for about a month. While it does not seem to help directly with the core ADHD symptoms, it has almost entirely eliminated my depression and social anxiety (and I believe has decreased my anxiety in general). The effect has been so profound that a couple of days after switching to my current dosage and formulation (I started on the instant release, which btw is being discontinued in August), I seemed to experience at least a few hours of rapid synaptogenesis, in which my perceptions of the world seemed new (or encoded differently) and I felt that I was learning it all over again.

    During this period, novelty seemed to cause a euphoric sensation, which I found concerning but thankfully was short-lived and manageable by throttling the novelty, which otherwise might have been overwhelming. To a much lesser degree this process seems to continue (without euphoria), as I occasionally seem to relearn things that I had perceived differently when I was depressed. Also, I have found that my coordination has improved, best evidenced by my improved pool playing. For the first time in my life, I have been able to feel relatively normal and content, and comfortable around other people, becoming far more extroverted. I no longer constantly worry about being judged, and do not feel inferior to the people around me. Eye contact is pleasurable rather than painful, as is exerting my will and expressing my desires. I am able to truly enjoy physical and emotional intimacy now. I see people more for who they truly are (their pain, their anxiety, their joy, etc.). The list goes on, but I'll end it here.

    My best guess regarding the mechanism by which memantine has been effective is this:

    - proinflammatory cytokines/mediators cause astrocytes to downregulate glutamate transporters EAAT-1 and EAAT-2 (underactivity of EAAT-1 in general may explain my intolerance to sub-chronic aspartame exposure)

    - Due to underactivity of these astrocytic glutamate transporters, either (1) excessive glutamate builds up in the synapses and causes oversaturation/downregulation/desensitization of the glutamate receptors, or (2) presynaptic release or synthesis of glutamate is downregulated to compensate. In light of the efficacy of memantine, (2) would seem to depend upon the use of presynaptic NMDA receptors to regulate release or synthesis, which is rather dubious, so I lean toward (1). If (2) were shown to be true, it would raise a concern regarding excitotoxicity.

    - (Assuming (1) above) memantine reduces the effect of excessive glutamate on NMDA receptors, allowing them to function more normally, through e.g. upregulation/translocation/sensitization, turning down/off natural pathways guarding against excitotoxicity. In other words, shifting the balance of stimulation from tonic to phasic.

    Of course, plenty of downstream effects on other neurotransmitter "systems" are then possible.

    I am hoping the reason the remainder of my ADHD symptoms have not been resolved is due to the fact that I am merely dealing with one of the effects of reduced synaptic glutamate clearance. I am presently looking into ways to upregulate EAAT-1 or EAAT-2 or (less desirably) antagonize the various other glutamate receptors. In the meantime, I continue to use Vyvanse, albeit at a reduced dosage. I am hoping to try ceftriaxone (unfortunately only available via IV or IM routes) or celecoxib to see whether they treat my brain fog and hyperactivity and comfortably replace memantine, Vyvanse, and omega-3s.

    In case anyone is curious, my current best guess at the etiology of my ADHD is the rs6565113 variant of the CDH13 (T-Cadherin) gene. This is statistically linked to ADHD and is likely to have significant inflammatory implications. (The state of knowledge regarding CDH13 is still rudimentary but highly intriguing.)

    Btw, I have a naturally high level of testosterone and a very youthful appearance, and I am aware of the possibility that properly treating my ADHD will normalize these traits, but that price would be well worth paying.

    I could go on, but I think I've covered all the big stuff. BTW, for those who are interested in memantine but are unable to get it, you may consider trying gentian root, which I've found to be relaxing and likely also works via NMDA receptors.

    I do not seem to be experiencing any side effects. I tapered and stopped Cymbalta (which did not seem to help me) after starting memantine and this seems to have caused "brain zaps" which are still tapering off - I believe this is unrelated to the memantine but am mentioning it just in case.

    https://www.longecity.org/forum/topi...ocial-anxiety/



    Last edited by mr peabody; 12-10-2018 at 21:31.
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    #30
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    1P-LSD vs Adderall

    I'm diagnosed with adult ADHD. I am a college professor who was often called scatter-brained. I have been on 20mg XR Adderall for about 1.5yrs. At times the effects seem diminished, yet I don't want to increase the dose. Instead, I will take days off or have 1/2 dose days. I have no other "serious" issues like bipolar or depression.

    After reading this thread and others related to the therapeutic value of a microdose for ADD, I decided to give it a try. I have now tried it 5 times and think I have a general sense of its pros and cons. Overall I think there are pros and cons for 1P-LSD vs Adderall related to ADD and I plan on using both for different reasons.

    1P-LSD advantages:

    To my surprise, the microdose gave me increased energy and motivation that rivaled Adderall. As well, the microdose gave me focus and clarity, yet in a very different way than Adderall.

    With the microdose, I was able to relate and organize things very well. For example, when I was making out my To-do list, I noticed how the list was scattered and I jump around doing unrelated tasks. It was so obvious that I could chunk together related tasks and budget time blocks to make things easier, more fun and efficient. This is probably Time Management 101, yet with my scattered brain, I never saw this (even with Adderall).

    I often avoid small tasks until I'm pressed on a deadline. On 1P-LSD these tasks seemed quite simple and easy (e.g. sending off a quick email to a colleague to promote a collaborative project, ordering a few reagents to get things moving forward in my lab, asking IT to install some software on a computer etc). As well as following up on these things.

    An increase of inter-relatedness and creativity. Preparing class lessons is often engaging for me and it was lots of fun microdosing. It was more obvious how various concepts in the course inter-relate and where students were having difficulties. I created a fun mnemonic story to explain frog embryogenesis (including characters like Debbie Disheveled, The Mad Scientist and Boney Men Psychedelic). It had a mostly positive student review.

    An increase in social engagement and empathy. Quite often, I feel busy and students can seem like a hindrance. Sometimes advising is just about going through the motions to get schedules set as fast as possible and move on. Yet, on a microdose, I had music in the background, students became interesting, and I notice their image, their vibe. We talked about their extracurricular activities. I learned one of my advisees is bilingual and we spoke 30min in Spanish (I am learning Spanish). We had fun and were both smiling. I was more in tune with the needs of my students.

    My normal procrastination escapes like playing Pokemon or reading political blogs are not as appealing.

    1P-LSD disadvantages:

    My ability to focus and analyze a single task was compromised. I had difficulty doing math and figuring out dilutions and molarity. I had difficulty reading primary literature, analyzing data and figuring out results. 1P-LSD was great for seeing the "big picture" and inter-relating things that I already knew and expressing those ideas. It sucked for a focused analysis.

    The increased empathy included some distracting insights. I felt more in tune with others, yet not always in a way that is good for social interactions.

    The set and setting is important for microdosing. On a busy day that included lots of structured tasks and grunt work that I wasn't into, I just became more irritable.

    Some of those creative ideas while microdosing seem a bit silly later on.

    Cumulative tolerance builds quick. After the above two weeks, I had to take a ridiculous amount of ETH-LAD + AL-LAD for a recreational effect.

    Adderall pros: Adderall is better than 1P-LSD for sustained focus on a single task, especially if it is new, complicated material I am analyzing. I can tune out other distractions. Grunt work was worse with 1P-LSD and not so bad with Adderall. Adderall also gives me a considerable energy and motivation boost.

    Adderall cons: After MDing, I realized there is much less color in life with Adderall. Often, I have no background music on. I have less of a desire to interact with others, to be outside, to appreciate life. It's almost like I am a machine doing whatever task is in front of me. With 1P-LSD, it was like I was doing what I wanted to do. With Adderall, it's easy to focus on whatever is in front of me - even if it is not important (like spending over an hour writing this essay).

    I've also realized that Adderall doesn't help my disorganization. On 1p-lsd it was so obvious how my disorganized office effects other areas of my life (wasting time looking for things, my office is not a great atmosphere for students to enter etc. I actually started organizing my office microdosing). Yet, with Adderall, I can enter my office, sit down at my desk and push piles of junk aside and focus on a computer task for hours - totally unbothered by a disorganized environment.

    For me, there are pros and cons with both 1P-LSD microdosing and Adderall. I am structuring my days to get the maximum benefit of each. 1P-LSD is much better for days where I have more open/flexible hours with tasks that involve integrating ideas, creativity and some social interactions. Adderall is better for sustained machine-like sustained focus on specific tasks (including complicated tasks) and busy days with little flexible time. Ideally, I hope to create a weekly schedule of 2 days 1P-LSD and 3 days Adderall (and maybe a day of Modafinil).

    -serotoninluv



    Ann and Sasha Shulgin
    Last edited by mr peabody; 04-10-2018 at 06:21.
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    #31
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    Psychedsubstances recommends that instead of Adderall you can microdose any psychedelic for improved focus, and that LSD was going to be in place of Ritalin if it weren't so tightly scheduled. I have tried microdosing LSD, and I found my mind was a lot calmer. IMO psychedelics are better than Adderall for calming the mind down. Once you start overthinking on Adderall, that's the time to microdose.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/microdosing...h_microdosing/

    -----

    Microdosing can help ADHD, but it's not a good long-term solution because tolerance will develop too quickly. You can only microdose once every few days. If you do it every day it will stop working. IMO, a good use of microdosing for ADHD is to take stimulants most days, then take a few days off per week, and microdose on those days to make things easier. This will help your dopamine and noradrenaline replenish, and keep your tolerance to both stims and psychs down.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/microdosing...h_microdosing/

    -----

    I've been experimenting with microdosing psychedelics for 2 years. It has been one of the most important personal growth and mental health practices I've used. This video shares my perspectives and experiences between magic mushrooms (psilocybin) and LSD and the differences in what they have offered me, including my comparison of microdosing LSD to Adderall and Modafinil for ADHD and ADD.

    https://youtu.be/a0fdD7EX0Hs

    -James Jesso

    -----

    I took Iboga at a center in Costa Rica with a traditional Bwiti Shaman. I went on two treatments over a week's period and it cured me of my depression and reduced my ADD to about 50% of what it was. My mind has seemed permanently clear and my fatigue is also gone since I took it several months ago. An amazing and relatively unknown treatment I recommend above all else!

    -anon

    -----

    ADHD is linked with a variety of sleep problems, and up to half of the people with ADHD have a persistent sleep disorder. A significant number of people with ADHD report having less refreshing sleep, feeling tired on awakening, difficulty getting up, significantly more daytime sleepiness, increased numbers of nightmares, sleep apnea, and restless legs syndrome.

    A study conducted in Paris by Cortese et. al. found that children with ADHD had higher rates of daytime sleepiness than children without ADHD. Another from Golan et. al., found that 50% of children with ADHD had signs of sleep disorders, compared to only 22% of children without ADHD.

    -MedicalAssessment.com


    Last edited by mr peabody; 08-10-2018 at 08:45.
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    #32
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    ADHD medication alternatives

    By Logan Pearce

    Psychedelic substances such LSD have been shown to treat symptoms of ADHD when consumed in microdoses. A microdose is calculated as half of the absolute threshold for psychoactivity. This means the amount of LSD consumed at a microdose does not cause any of the effects associated with recreational use.

    Other psychedelics of the tryptamine group, such as psilocybin, also known as magic mushrooms, have been shown to treat symptoms of ADHD when consumed in microdoses. Also, sufferers of depression and anxiety have shown positive results when treated with psychedelic substances.

    Unable to conduct experiments in the lab, researchers have been forced to rely on the testimony of assigned subjects. Subjects receive instructions on how to properly microdose the substances and log the effects they observe in journals. Subjects report an increased ability to focus, increased productivity and energy boosts.

    These benefits show that psilocybin and LSD need to be considered for legalization for medical research. If medical research shows that these are alternative treatments, patients will receive relief from the possibility of negative side effects associated with today’s ADHD medications.

    -----

    Let me start this off by saying the only mind altering substances I've done (besides my meds... I have ADHD) are LSD and mushrooms - no alcohol, weed, whatever. So I went into the first of those experiences having no clue what inebriation felt like. Luckily I had very experienced friends to help me through both trips, so my experiences were great.

    The first trip (mushrooms) was one of the most profound experiences in my life. I remember sitting on the ground and my mind was QUIET! I could suddenly think without having thoughts race in and around my head and I was calm. I felt relaxed and I had the complete ability to focus on single things at a time and appreciate them without getting distracted. My body felt good and I felt good and happy with the world and my decisions.

    Once I learned to control the visuals, LSD also quieted my mind. There was a long period of time where I was lying in my bed unable to speak, but able to have complete focus on the beautiful visuals. I'm on 70mg of vyvanse and I'm never able to have that much focus. Even though I had extensive babble sessions with friends, I didn't feel like I was having that scattered word vomit that I usually have when I'm off my meds.

    For a month after taking mushrooms, my head was WAY clearer than normal. I felt like I didn't need to take my meds to effectively concentrate in school, and I lowered my dose for the next three. I got back on my normal dose once the month was done. My acid trip is (still) producing similar results. I feel clearer and far less fuzzy than normal. The effects have just about worn off, but it's been about a month, so that's expected...I guess?

    -sciencekitty



    Last edited by mr peabody; 08-10-2018 at 08:41.
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    Hunter vs. farmer hypothesis

    Hunter vs. farmer is a proposed explanation of the nature of ADHD first suggested by Thom Hartmann in his book Attention Deficit Disorder: a Different Perception. This hypothesis proposes that ADHD represents a lack of adaptation by those in hunter-gatherer societies to their transformation into farming societies. Hartmann developed the idea after his own son was diagnosed with ADHD, stating, "It's not hard science, and was never intended to be." However, more recent molecular and clinical research has given support to a genetic theory of ADHD arising from evolutionary adaptation.

    Hartmann notes that humans were nomadic hunter-gatherers for hundreds of thousands of years, but that this gradually changed as agriculture developed, and more people worldwide became farmers. Over many years, most humans adapted to farming cultures, but Hartmann speculates that people with ADHD retained some of the older hunter characteristics.

    A key component of the hypothesis is that the "hyperfocus" aspect of ADHD is a gift or benefit under appropriate circumstances. The hypothesis also explains the distractibility factor in ADHD individuals and their short attention span for subject matter that does not interest the individual, along with various other characteristics such as apathy towards social norms, poor planning and organizing ability, distorted sense of time, impatience, attraction to variety or novelty or excitement, and impulsiveness. It is argued that in the hunter-gatherer cultures that preceded farming societies, hunters needed hyperfocus more than gatherers.

    A genetic variant associated with ADHD has been found in more nomadic populations and those with a history of migration. Consistent with this the health status of nomadic Ariaal men was higher if they had the ADHD associated genetic variant (7R alleles). However, in recently sedentary (non-nomadic) Ariaal those with 7R alleles seemed to have slightly worse health.

    Science and the hunter vs. farmer hypothesis

    The hunter vs. farmer hypothesis proposes that the high frequency of ADHD in contemporary settings "represents otherwise normal behavioral strategies that become maladaptive in such evolutionarily novel environments as the formal school classroom." It was stated that the lack of 'hyperfocus' should not be the only dichotomy of 'Farmers vs. Hunter-gatherers' identified in Hartman's theory. From an evolutionary viewpoint, "hyperfocus" was advantageous, conferring superb hunting skills and a prompt response to predators. Hominins have been hunter gatherers throughout 90% of human history from the beginning, before evolutionary changes, fire-making, and countless breakthroughs in stone-age societies. Humans devised better innovations and organizational structures to boost their living, and the need for hyperactivity slowly diminished over a long period of time regardless of whether they were in a gathering or farming society.

    Glickman & Dodd found that adults with self-reported ADHD scored higher than normal adults on self-reported ability to hyper-focus on "urgent tasks", such as last-minute projects. Adults in the ADHD group were uniquely able to postpone eating, sleeping and other personal needs and stay absorbed in the "urgent task" for an extended time. A 2008 New Scientist article by Tim Callaway reports that research of ADHD and related traits in different cultures offers some support for the hunter vs. farmer hypothesis. According to anthropologist Ben Campbell of the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, studies of the Ariaal, an isolated nomadic group in Kenya, suggest that hyperactivity and impulsivity—key traits of ADHD—have distinct advantages to nomadic peoples. Additionally, nomadic Ariaal have high rates of a genetic mutation linked to ADHD, while more settled Ariaal populations have lower rates of this mutation. Henry Harpending of the University of Utah reports that with this genetic mutation, "You probably do better in a context of aggressive competition."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hunter...mer_hypothesis
    Last edited by mr peabody; 12-10-2018 at 21:29.
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    #34
    Bluelighter mr peabody's Avatar
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    Having ADHD myself I've tried microdosing LSD and it works wonders! I feel like it's what I've always been looking for.

    -standinghampton

    • • •

    I was diagnosed with ADHD. I spent a month microdosing LSD. It was one of the happiest and most productive months I've ever had. Good luck!

    -dakobah

    • • •

    I have ADHD. I found mushrooms to be more foggy-headed and sedating, definitely not helpful. I have, however, microdosed LSD many times and it works well.
    It gives you a natural-feeling energy for 6-8 or hours and can increase focus and both creative and analytical thought.

    -FreeManBeat

    • • •

    I actually use microdoses of LSD (10-15ug) to treat my ADHD. It acts in a very similar way to Vyvanse or Adderall, without the side effects. It works wonders for me.

    -cmg

    • • •

    I've got ADD and I'm prescribed a stimulant, but I prefer microdosing LSD. It feels cleaner and more natural, and I don't feel drugged on it like with stimulants. And often
    I can be crazy productive when I take it. In small doses it's pretty much the perfect drug for me.

    -YeahButThatsNothing


    Last edited by mr peabody; 08-10-2018 at 08:38.
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    #35
    Bluelighter mr peabody's Avatar
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    CBD Oil for ADHD – Nature’s most miraculous plant medicine

    I’m on a quest to find products that work for people with ADHD. So in this article, you’ll come to understand the magical benefits of using CBD oil for ADHD.

    I’d heard unbelievably positive stories about CBD oil for years now. I’d heard about CBD oil helping people who suffer from ADHD, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and various other conditions live a more comfortable lifestyle. Most importantly, I heard that CBD oil actually helps people with life-altering health issues enjoy a much better quality of life. So, I was finally able try CBD oil for myself (after hearing the many amazing stories involving CBD oil). And, now I can say with certainty that CBD oil is one of the best nutritional supplements that I’ve tried.

    CBD oil essentially puts your brain “at ease” and makes it easier to concentrate. Using CBD oil for ADHD is a positive experience for most people. ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder which can make it difficult to control what you focus on. It’s a disorder of control. This is why people with ADHD often jump from one shiny object to the next, focus on the “wrong” tasks, or waste energy on things that don’t really matter.

    If you have ADHD, then you know best that you CAN focus. You just have trouble actually doing the things that you know you should be doing. You probably overthink things. Your thoughts sometimes spiral out of control. And, there’s even a chance that your anxiety prevents you from doing what needs to be done on a day-to-day basis.

    “ADHD is often comorbid with anxiety, with rates approaching 25% in many samples.”

    If your ADHD is rooted in anxiety, there is a chance that taking control of your anxiety will provide you with the greatest improvement in your health and happiness. CBD oil is one of the best natural substances for temporarily soothing some of the issues that come with ADHD and anxiety. CBD oil can provide you with a nice boost of mental clarity that really improves how you feel on any given day. And it’s a great pick-me-up.

    For example, it’s really easy for me to get stuck in my own head. But, after taking CBD oil for the first time, I found myself not really (over) thinking about stuff.

    - I was more talkative than normal
    - I was “in my body” rather than stuck in my own head
    - I didn’t experience as much “mental resistance” to accomplishing tasks

    And, I especially enjoyed trying CBD oil because the results were instantaneous. I didn’t have to wait for weeks to notice results, like I would have to do with black seed oil (for example). It’s pretty comforting that a simple over-the-counter dietary supplement like CBD oil has the potential to provide immediate, noticeable results in people with ADHD.

    Overall, I would rank CBD oil as a 8.5/10 solution for improving the lives of people with ADHD – because it’s a safe, effective, and sustainable natural remedy.

    http://adhdboss.com/cbd-oil-adhd/


    Last edited by mr peabody; 12-10-2018 at 21:32.
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