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    Bluelighter mr peabody's Avatar
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    Psychedelic miracle


    Richard Dilley had tried everything by the time he traveled to Mexico and agreed to ingest a drug derived from a psychedelic African shrub bark that, he was told, would alter his brain. While terrifying in a way, ibogaine was, at this point, less of a horror than the drug Dilley had been addicted to since his teen years.

    Heroin.

    Ibogaine, he understood, would fix him, would remove that insurmountable urge for a high that had destroyed his once-promising life. It was his last hope.

    Ibogaine comes from the iboga plant that is primarily found in Gabon, on the Atlantic coast of Equatorial Africa, where those of the Bwiti religion use the drug as part of puberty initiation rites. While it is illegal in the United States, proponents have been working to legalize it for decades, saying it's a miracle treatment that wards off withdrawals, not only from heroin, but from drugs in general. That makes it completely unique, as no other drug does what ibogaine appears to do — fix dopamine regulation in the brain that's been thrown out of whack by addiction.

    This isn't just a claim being touted by enthusiastic former heroin addicts. The drug has been the subject of many scientific studies and was even approved for Phase I clinical trials with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in the early 1990s, though the tests were never completed. Scientists are now testing a drug made from ibogaine that someday could be a legal treatment for drug addiction in the United States. Clinics exist around the world, dispensing the not-risk-free drug, often paired with a variety of other treatments from massage to hyperbaric chambers. But addicts have to know about ibogaine to get it, and then they must be able to afford treatments that generally cost thousands of dollars.

    All of this is playing out at a time when heroin use has reached epidemic levels, with easier availability in Colorado Springs and the West. In fact, Gov. John Hickenlooper was among the nation's governors to sign a compact this month to fight opioid addiction by better controlling prescription opioids, educating the public about opioids and addiction, and helping addicts recover.

    By the time Dilley flew to an ibogaine clinic, he already had tried the traditional path, going to doctors and taking Suboxone, a maintenance drug for opioid addicts similar to the more well-known Methadone. But Dilley's addiction was deep, its roots stretched back to his childhood.

    "When I was a kid," says Dilley, now 28 and living in Colorado, "we were taught there were two kinds of drugs: the good drugs that the doctors prescribed and the bad drugs that you should never do."

    Dilley never had tried drugs or alcohol when, at age 14, he suffered a broken arm skateboarding near his home in McFarland, Wisconsin. His doctor gave him 30 Vicodin and sent him on his way without further comment. The drug felt amazing. After the pills ran out, Dilley sometimes would sort through medicine cabinets when he was at other people's houses, snatching any painkillers.

    When he was 17, his parents kicked him out of the house after he hosted a party at which expensive glassware was broken and some items were stolen. Dilley stayed for a few days with friends before returning to his parents' home. It was then that he first snorted Oxycontin.

    A year later, he was living nearby with his brother, who was six years older, and a friend. That's when the pills really became a problem. He was using them and selling them, until a friend warned him that the cops were casing his house. When he stopped selling, he no longer could afford his habit. Besides, it was getting expensive. When he was a teenager, Oxy had been everywhere, and cheap — $20 for an 80-milligram pill that would wreck you. But when he was 18, a switch was flipped. Oxy wasn't everywhere anymore, and it wasn't cheap. The same high that had cost $20 before now cost $80.

    Dilley's friends began switching to heroin. At first he didn't want to follow their example. He kept flashing on that scene in Pulp Fiction where Uma Thurman ODs and blood is flowing from her nose. But Dilley's friends said that was just a movie, that it didn't really happen like that. So he started by snorting it, which was familiar because he had done the same thing with the painkillers. A week later, Dilley and his friends were with a guy who had hemophilia and a familiarity with needles. The kid taught them to shoot up heroin.

    "Once you do that, there is no turning back," Dilley says.

    And he functioned as an addict, in a way. He went back and forth between living in his parents' basement and with his brother. He delivered pizzas for a living. He went to technical college, but dropped out in his second semester and blew the refund on drugs. Heroin was a $100-a-day habit, and it wasn't always working out. Once, before a family dinner, Dilley's dealer was late. When Dilley finally got his heroin, he took it all at once. He woke up next to his car with a frantic woman standing over him. He had to fight her off and drive away, so she wouldn't call the cops.

    Then, in his early 20s, Dilley's brother discovered his stash and ordered him to go to treatment. He complied. Doctors put him on Suboxone and into a support group, and they told him he'd need to be on maintenance drugs for the rest of his life.

    "They would constantly tell you you're a worthless piece of shit, you're incurable, and you've got to submit yourself to God," he remembers.

    Years passed. Dilley's father died in June 2011. A year later, he heard about ibogaine for the first time in a news story. Then he ran into an old friend and former addict who had taken it.

    "He wasn't on any drugs, and he had goals — and I wanted that," Dilley recalls.

    With the help of his friend, Dilley convinced his mother to use part of his father's life insurance to pay for ibogaine treatment. In June 2013, he hopped on the plane to go to an ibogaine clinic. He was following a path many desperate addicts have taken for decades. Ibogaine may be illegal in the United States, but it's readily available in many countries.

    A lot of the people in the ibogaine business object to removing its psychedelic properties, saying the trip is a part of the healing process. The claim isn't completely out of left field — some research is showing promise for the medical use of psychedelic drugs. In 2014, for instance, the first study on LSD approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 40 years, showed that 12 terminally ill patients given LSD and psychotherapy showed relief from end-of-life anxiety.

    According to those who have tried it, the trip on ibogaine is a spiritual journey like no other.

    Las Vegas DJ Justin Hoffman, 47, says the party lifestyle led him to become a heroin addict more than 20 years ago. He finally got clean using Methadone and Suboxone and attending Alcoholics Anonymous classes, where he says the late DJ AM was his sponsor. Hoffman credits DJ AM with saving his life. But when DJ AM died in 2009 of a drug overdose, Hoffman says he fell off the wagon. And then there were all the antidepressants, anxiety medications, bipolar medications, sleep medications and ADD medications.

    "I was sick of it," he says. "I was like, I feel like a pharmaceutical dumpster."

    Then he heard about ibogaine, and went to Mexico to try it. He says the blockage of the withdrawals was one part of his recovery, but the trip was just as important.

    "There are real spirits involved with this medicine that come to you and actually talk to you and answer questions," he says. "If it was just me, I'd say, whoa, that's a hallucination. But it's not. Everybody has the same experience and has the same black, tribal African guy coming to them. You know it's not just a hallucination. There's something real happening here. I would have never believed any of this. Four years ago, I would have laughed at it, but now I know the truth."

    The other part he says, is that the hallucinations extract memories. He recalls seeing himself being abused as a 2-year-old during his trip. Once you deal with those root causes, he says, you don't feel the need for the drugs. The spirit, he says, "acts as a therapist."

    Many describe ibogaine's trip as a "waking dream." Interestingly, the hallucinations are known to be more intense when the eyes are closed.

    When Hoffman returned from ibogaine therapy — which he says got him off all drugs, prescription or otherwise — he says he knew he needed to help others. He began by using his fame (both as a popular DJ and as the nephew of famous anti-war activist Abbie Hoffman) to get word of the drug to others, particularly fellow DJs, and help them access what he believed to be the most reputable ibogaine clinics in Mexico.

    A year ago, he says, he was given the free use of a mansion in Las Vegas, where he opened an after-care program for addicts, Holistic House Las Vegas.

    Now, he refers addicts to Mexican ibogaine clinics — ones that he says medically screen patients to ensure the drug won't be dangerous for them — then he cares for them for a month or more after their return in an effort to heighten their chances of kicking drug abuse for good.

    "Ibogaine's a miracle, there's no doubt about that," Hoffman says, "but people need more."

    For prices ranging from $8,394 for 30 days in a standard room to $21,000 for 60 days in a master suite, Hoffman says he helps addicts continue their physical and spiritual healing. He's had 40-50 patients in the aftercare program, and says that of the people he's helped (both in aftercare and with referrals) he thinks about 70 percent are still clean. While many clinics offer aftercare, there are no established norms for it, and the programs tend to be colorful. At Holistic House, for instance, patients are engaged in a variety of yoga practices, boxing, gym workouts, nature hikes, flotation tank sessions, Reiki, consultations with healers and western therapy, among other things. He even gives patients frog venom that he believes heals a variety of ailments, including HIV and cancer.

    "We do all these things in order to get them feeling better as quick as possible," he says. "Because addicts will use any excuse. If they're having diarrhea for too long, they're like, I've gotta use some dope, I can't take this diarrhea. It's absolutely ridiculous. So, if I get them feeling good within two days, they then develop some trust with me and they realize that I know what I'm doing, and they let go, they're like, 'You tell me what to do.' Those are the people who really succeed with it."

    One of the Mexican clinics that Hoffman refers patients was co-founded by Mark Winkle, a respiratory therapist and former heroin addict.

    Winkle says he was addicted to heroin, pain pills, Suboxone or Methadone for 10 years before he heard about ibogaine and headed to Mexico for treatment. He had, interestingly, worked in medicine for several years at that point, mostly in emergency rooms, but says he couldn't manage to deal with his own health. Winkle had just become a father when he heard about ibogaine, and he didn't want to live his life on drugs. Ibogaine promised a way out.

    "It changed my life," he says. "It was the greatest thing to happen to me since my son was born."

    Ibogaine has been illegal in the United States since 1967 and the federal government lists it as a Schedule I substance. That means it is thought to have a high potential for abuse, it currently has no accepted medical use in treatment in the United States, and there is a lack of accepted safety for use of the drug under medical supervision.

    Other Schedule I drugs — or drugs considered the most dangerous — include heroin, marijuana and LSD. Interestingly, cocaine and methamphetamine have the lower classification of Schedule II drugs. Ketamine is a Schedule III drug. However, ibogaine clinics abound in many other countries where the drug is variously legal, unregulated or available by prescription or has a murky legal status. That includes our neighboring countries, Mexico and Canada, where a quick internet search brings up a multitude of clinics. Ibogaine is also known to be available for purchase easily on the internet. There have been some efforts to bring ibogaine to the U.S. legally.

    The problem with the maze of worldwide clinics is that it's difficult to tell the responsible ones from the irresponsible ones, and ibogaine comes with real risks. The 2016 case report, "Ibogaine-associated cardiac arrest and death: case report and review of the literature," written by Jessica A. Meisner, Susan R. Wilcox and Jeremy B. Richards, notes that one ibogaine user "suffered acute cardiac arrest leading to cerebral edema and brain death," which was "consistent with ibogaine-induced cardiotoxicity and ibogaine-induced cardiac arrest." It wasn't the only recorded death associated with the drug — the report states that 19 deaths were recorded between 1990 and 2008 worldwide, with the cause attributable at least in part either to detoxification or cardiac complications.

    The risks haven't been ignored by Global Ibogaine Therapy Alliance, which describes itself as "a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to supporting the sacramental and therapeutic uses of iboga, as well as its alkaloids and their analogs, through sustainability initiatives, scientific research, education, and advocacy." Its site includes a long list of conditions that should be checked for before the administration of ibogaine. With some conditions, ibogaine should not be given at all, it notes, while in other cases the patient should be made aware of the heightened risk and be supervised by a medical professional, or the drug should only be administered under certain conditions. The group strongly advises against self-administering ibogaine.

    Doug Greene, GITA's patient advocacy coordinator, says ibogaine patients need to ensure that all these risks are being considered before taking the drug.

    "We tell them it's a drug that certainly has potential physical and psychological risks," he says.

    "This is why, last year, we came up with clinical guidelines for its use. But we also tell people that it is something that has great potential as a tool in conjunction with other treatment modalities."

    GITA would like to see ibogaine and related alternatives continue their FDA trials, but can't afford to foot the bill. Nevertheless, it continues to raise money for further studies of the drug, and to track studies that are being done. One thing it's trying to show is that clinically, it appears ibogaine is very effective.

    "Two studies being conducted by MAPS, attempt to track the long-term efficacy of ibogaine-assisted detox for opiate dependence," it notes on its website. "The studies, in Mexico and New Zealand, have reported preliminary results of 20% and 50% respectively, for clients remaining free from their primary substance of abuse for at least 12 months."

    Before Dilley went to Mexico, the clinic asked him to go on a raw, organic diet for seven days. He tried, but says he failed. The clinic also asked him to get off Suboxone for 30 days. He did manage that — by shooting up heroin. In fact, before he got on the plane from Wisconsin to Los Angeles, Dilley shot up heroin and took Xanax. By the time the plane landed, and he met up with the clinic staff, the withdrawals were already kicking in. He was driven to Mexico and taken to a doctor, who screened his health to ensure ibogaine would be safe. Then he was taken to the clinic.

    Really, he says, it was a Baja resort, with beautiful views of the ocean. Initially, he was given IV amino acids, after signing a bunch of waivers. Then he was told to lie down, which he did, until the withdrawals left him kicking and screaming. He first was given a test dose of ibogaine, which he threw up. Then he was given the pills with water. He thinks it was about 15 minutes before the pain went away "like a wave."

    "It was just this whole body vibration and warmth, and there's no pain, all of that just kind of washed away," he says. "And that was the last time I felt any withdrawal symptoms."

    He stayed in bed for the next day and a half, blindfolded to encourage hallucinations and discourage nausea. Dilley didn't see any tribal guys in his hallucinations. Instead, he saw himself as a fish, trying to protect an egg that kept on breaking. Then he was a god of sorts, creating nations, armies and castles.

    "I don't know if that was the drug telling me that I can do whatever I want and create whatever I want in real life," he says.

    When that ended, Dilley was exhausted and initially hated the routine of massage, jacuzzi pools, hyperbaric chambers, organic food, and amino acids that he was subjected to.
    But after a couple days, it felt like a vacation.

    The first year that he was back in Wisconsin, he says, he kept to himself. He was making $2,000 a month delivering pizzas, still living in his mom's basement, skateboarding, biking, and learning to cook. He was taking care of himself. But he wanted something more.

    The massage therapist at the ibogaine clinic had said he should become a massage therapist, and he felt drawn to it. So, two years ago, he packed up and moved to Denver, where he's in his last semester of earning his associate degree from the Colorado School of Healing Arts. He says his own life made him want to heal others — he hopes that one day he may even work at an ibogaine clinic in some other country, assuming it remains illegal in the United States. Dilley's arms now feature two tattoos, one of the chemical structure of the psychedelic DMT, which he took once after returning to Wisconsin for spiritual purposes, and one of the chemical structure of ibogaine, with the word "freedom" in script under it.

    "Whenever I talk to anyone about my life, that is the pivotal point in my timeline," Dilley says of ibogaine. "It's either everything before that point, or everything after that point."

    https://www.csindy.com/coloradosprin...nt?oid=3912274
    Last edited by mr peabody; 07-10-2018 at 10:20.
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    Bluelighter mr peabody's Avatar
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    Daily low dosing

    It is a very good idea to completely detox from antidepressants before doing a treatment. Personally, I ate small doses (around 1g bark) for about a week before flooding, and received many of the typical benefits (extreme mental and physical calmness, vivid memory recall, personal insight, brain massage feelings, tracers, reduced appetite for food and sleep, changed habits, etc) just from the daily doses before flooding. I think just eating small amounts daily is a viable option, especially if one has any health concerns. Of course flooding does offer a unique transformation, but the small daily doses are very very powerful in themselves. Taking small doses before or even in place of a flood is definitely an option.

    10 grams of quality bark is a strong experience for some people. I think there is pretty extreme variation in people's sensitivity that cannot be estimated simply by gender and weight. Usually people who have never eaten iboga are very sensitive at first. Generally, 10 grams is not considered a strong enough dose to get a full reset and break strong opiate addictions.

    -rho

    -----

    Ibogaine has also been given in regimens of small daily doses of 25 to 300 mgs/day, where the dose is increased on a daily basis until the desired interruption of drug dependence is accomplished. These low dose modalities have not been validated for efficacy to the same extent as have the full therapeutic doses of ibogaine. However, these low dose regimens can be traced back some decades to the work of Leo Zeff who in the case of a single patient provided ibogaine on an "as needed" basis via nasal administration to a cocaine dependent patient to substitute for his cocaine use. Lines of ibogaine were somewhat equivalent to lines of cocaine and the patient ceased cocaine use after a week of this daily self-regulated ibogaine regimen. Additionally, reports from Canadian sources indicate multi-week low dose ibogaine therapy 20 mg/day following a therapeutic dose of ibogaine in the treatment of cocaine dependence. Further, reports throughout the ibogaine provider community indicate the use of multiple dosing of varying strength doses over varying time periods are effective in the treatment of opioid dependence. As with all determinations in medicine, decisions must be made based on observations of the patient and knowledge of the disorder(s) and the medication(s) used.

    https://truthtalk13.wordpress.com/20...gaine-therapy/

    -----

    Iboga does have dangerous interactions with opioids - when used irresponsibly. What I wanted to relay, specifically, is that at LOW doses (again, 10 - 20mg) the opiate reset effect is fairly minimal - it seemed not so much to reset tolerance as to halt its development, which allowed me to use the chemicals I needed to in a stretch without incurring a massive habit, something that may be INCREDIBLY useful to people in chronic pain management situations. Now, I fully think that anyone taking it at all should probably have the arrhythmia screening - but then again, I also put up to your consideration the sale of lambarine, a 12mg ibogaine pep pill commonly sold in France at the turn of the century, and seems to have no connotation of being dangerous or causing death in the people taking it. But it is a risk calculation. In my particular situation it was "OMG, I'm doing some shit totally beyond the pale of normal human behavior, the end result of which may be completely unmanageable addiction and probably death, or I could try this untested compound in a new way that I have a hunch may just do the trick (I'd done a flood dose before to kick dope)." All I wanted to do is honestly relay, that I feel this compound has saved my life a second time, and that continued low dose usage seems to have compounding positive effects both on my mental state and immune system. I don't know that I want to take it forever, it kind of seems to even mitigate administration of itself along with other chemicals, and as time goes on my drive to take it certainly diminishes. I'm not saying I want to take this stuff forever. I'm saying if I NEED it, I never want to be without it.

    -cdin

    -----

    For those flooding

    Best to have new routines in place before the session, and alternate ways of coping with the normal stressors we all face. It really isn't will power as much as practical plans for dealing with life, and the belief that life can change. All ibo can guarantee is an interruption of the addiction. That's it, the only guarantee. The more plans one makes for how to handle the stressors, and how to see why using occurred the way it did in the first place, the better the chances of succeeding at whatever goal one has.

    I work with people before and after the session to encourage the best pre and post care possible. Even for those who go back to using, I still see benefit. Like shame and guilt reduction, resolution of issues caused by early trauma, etc. It's not often mentioned, but some folk require 2-3 sessions. It seems that ibo targets the most pressing issues first. So, with a junkie, that would be the addiction. Maybe next time, deeper delving into emotional wounds which could have caused using in the first place. I myself have had one flood only, and it worked.

    BOOSTERS. No-one should be sent home from a session without some boosters. These are smaller doses of the medicine, safe to take at home. Most benefit from one at 30 days.

    -lol_Taco


    Last edited by mr peabody; 07-10-2018 at 09:59.
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    Ibogaine detox at Vancouver General

    A 37 year old caucasian woman with a 19-year history of heroin use. She was off heroin for just 2 months (while on methadone) only to relapse. Following 4-day Ibogaine course, not only didn't she suffer protracted withdrawals, but more important, she's stayed sober for 1.5 years following her flood dose... Amazingly, she credits the psychological insights of her Ibogaine trip as the key for her staying sober. Ibogaine may not work for every single person, but for those who benefit, it is truly magical. As with anything in life, if you believe it won't work, then it won't; and if you believe it will work, then it will. The Buddha discovered that Universal Law of how the human mind works 2500 years ago: "you are what you think you are."

    -DotChem

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    Remission of severe opioid use disorder with ibogaine: A case report

    Background: Opioid use disorders (OUD) translate into major health, social, and economic consequences. Opioid agonist medications, which generally require long-term administration, are the mainstay pharmacological treatment of OUD. However, a large proportion of individuals with OUD either refuse or fail to respond to these therapies. Ibogaine, a naturally occurring substance found in the Tabernanthe iboga plant, has shown potential to bring about transformative or spiritual experiences that have reportedly been associated with long-term abstinence. Although research on ibogaine is limited, an ibogaine subculture persists, offering unregulated ibogaine preparations for the treatment of addiction.

    Case presentation: We describe the case of a 37-year-old female with a 19-year history of severe OUD achieving an ongoing 18-month period of abstinence following a four-day ibogaine treatment. Her previous longest period of continuous abstinence from opioids was two months while on methadone. No safety issues associated with ibogaine were observed.

    Conclusion: A four-day treatment with ibogaine was successful in achieving long-term remission of a previously treatment-refractory patient with severe OUD. While rigorous trials are required to establish safety and efficacy, future studies should seek to delineate the potential role of ibogaine that may produce transformative experiences for individuals with substance use disorder.

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/...nalCode=ujpd20
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    The Iboga spirit appeared to me as a black man, an African warrior, and said he was there to help me. I immediately began thinking about my father, as I have much childhood trauma associated with him. Iboga clapped his hands, and my dad appeared. He looked drunk and had an aggressive, angry expression on his face, with his fists in the air like he was about to beat me. Suddenly, Iboga clapped his hands again, and instantly my father was transformed into a scared little boy, around age eleven, crying about being beaten by his grandfather (his primary caregiver during his childhood). This vision humbled me to a level I had never felt before; the massive resentment I held towards my father was uprooted out of me by Iboga.

    Next, came my mother. Iboga did something very different this time: he transformed me into my mother, and all of a sudden I felt all the pain and suffering that I had caused her during my addiction through lying, stealing, manipulating. This vision humbled me to a level I never felt before, and after the experience, I cannot bring myself to lie to her without bawling my eyes out, precisely because I was her and I felt all the pain I had caused her. Iboga allowed me to forgive myself for the pain I caused the woman who loved me more than anyone else in the world, but he emphasized that I must never again cause her that type of pain.

    I remember my hallucinations. I saw shamans in my closed eye visuals staring at me. I also saw a jaguar just staring into my eyes. The worst part was when I saw my mom crying. When I would use drugs, my mom would cry sometimes, but when I was high I didn't care. When I saw my mom crying, I felt so shitty, like I owe her for all her happiness that was lost.

    I laid there in bed and I had deep locked thoughts from my childhood, flashbacks of all the negative experiences I had, and realized exactly why I used drugs to begin with. I did also see open eye visuals. There was one moment where I saw a pair of non-human eyes floating above, then all of a sudden a long tongue dropped to my bed where the eyes were, this hallucination was very shocking. It was like the same shock experienced when you hear a loud and unexpected sound. Ibogaine had a lot of those moments. Ibogaine is like a stern teacher or parent teaching you a lesson, it is not fun and games. Towards the end, I felt very peaceful.

    I was at peace with everything. I accepted my fate, that I had died trying to save myself from a lifetime of misery as well as everyone around me. The ibogaine was working a miracle and saving my life. It totally cleansed my body from every toxin I had put in it for 20 years. It defragmented my brain and allowed me to reboot. I was laying there like a dead man and all of a sudden the power came back on.

    https://thethirdwave.co/ibogaine-treatment/


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    Overcoming heroin addiction, My Story

    By Aeden Smith-Ahearn

    I was a heroin addict since my teenage years. My parents spent loads of money shipping me all around the country to different rehabs, none of which actually worked long-term.
    I would get a couple of months clean then somehow end up neck deep in addiction, not knowing how I got back there. It was cyclical.

    The time came where my parents suggested Suboxone or Methadone. I'd seen how it was a lifelong crutch for friends, and that getting off of it seemed impossible. Out of desperation,
    and intensive internet searching, I came across Ibogaine treatment. At this point I had surrendered to the idea that if it works, great! If it doesn't, it doesn't, but Ill give it a shot.

    I came to Mexico in November of 2012 very uncertain and skeptical, but I tried to keep an open mind. My parents worried for me so much, they can only take so many years of my abuse towards myself and them. My dad told me this was my last chance. That scared me. I needed to make this work.

    So, I applied for treatment. My medical screening came back, and I was qualified. I began Ibogaine treatment for my addiction the same day that I arrived in Mexico. I was nervous.

    The medicine gave me visions about my life and who I was as a person. Stuff I didn't want to look at or accept. It showed me how I treated myself and those closest to me. I could begin
    to see what I was running from and trying to mask with drugs. Things that Im still changing in myself to this day. I felt so awful about what I had done with my past, but at the end of my experience the medicine told me that, even after everything I had done to my family and myself, there was a second chance.

    When I got out of bed the next day the sun was up. The ocean was there just staring at me. It was beautiful. The world, which I was numb to, was visible again. I became so grateful for everything in my life, to have a family and friends, to have food and a roof over my head, just to be alive. These were things I was taking for granted.

    I felt like a new person, or the person I was before I was torn apart by drug addiction. And I didn't have any withdrawal symptoms. I decided against going home so early in my recovery.
    So, I went to another clinic for aftercare where I helped out, got more acquainted with myself and others who had completed Ibogaine treatment.

    Eventually, I decided I wanted to work with people who had the same issues as me and help get them into treatment. Since then I've worked with some 1,000+ patients. Ibogaine works.

    -----

    Subjective effectiveness of ibogaine treatment for problematic opioid consumption: Short- and long-term outcomes

    A. Davis, A. Windham-Herman, J. Barsuglia, M. Lynch, M. Polanco

    Very few studies have reported the effectiveness of ibogaine as a treatment for chronic opioid use. Therefore, this study evaluated the acute subjective effects of ibogaine, outcomes on problematic opioid consumption, and the long-term associations with psychological functioning. Using online data collection, 88 patients who received ibogaine treatment in Mexico between 2012 and 2015 completed our survey.

    Most participants (72 percent) had used opioids for at least 4 years and 69% reported daily use. Most (80 percent)indicated that ibogaine eliminated or drastically reduced withdrawal symptoms. Fifty percent reported that ibogaine reduced opioid craving, some (25 percent) reporting a reduction in craving lasting at least 3 months. Thirty percent of participants reported never using opioids again following ibogaine treatment. And over one half (54 percent) of these abstainers had been abstinent for at least 1 year, with 31% abstinent for at least 2 years. At the time of survey, 41% of all participants reported sustained abstinence (>6 months). Although 70% of the total sample reported a relapse following treatment, 48% reported decreased use from pretreatment levels and an additional 11% eventually achieved abstinence. Treatment responders had the lowest rates of depressive and anxious symptoms, the highest levels of subjective well-being and rated their ibogaine treatment as more spiritually meaningful compared with treatment non-responders.

    The results suggest that ibogaine is associated with reductions in opioid use, including complete abstinence, and has long-term positive psychological outcomes. Future research should investigate the efficacy of ibogaine treatment using rigorous longitudinal and controlled designs.

    https://www.stichtingopen.nl/subject...l-functioning/
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    To avoid overdose, some are testing their heroin before taking it


    The newest tool in the fight against opioid overdoses is an inexpensive test strip that can help heroin users detect fentanyl. Sales of fentanyl test strips have exploded as a growing number of overdose-prevention programs hand them out to people who use heroin. Some health officials question their accuracy, but they have proven to be so popular that some programs can't get enough to satisfy demand. "As soon as I hit the street with them, they're gone," said Washington, D.C., needle-exchange outreach worker Maurice Abbey-Bey.

    The U.S. is in the midst of the deadliest drug overdose epidemic in its history, and it's been getting worse. More than 70,000 Americans died of drug overdoses last year, a 10 percent increase from the year before, according to preliminary U.S. government numbers. Growing numbers of recent deaths have been attributed to the painkiller fentanyl and fentanyl-like drugs. The drugs are far more potent than heroin, but they are relatively cheap and increasingly have been cut by suppliers into street drugs without buyers' knowledge.

    The strips sell for $1 each. Costs can quickly add up because some people use drugs four or five times a day. Government agencies have begun paying for the test strips and providing them to needle-exchange programs. The state health department in California started last year, and health departments in some cities including Philadelphia and Columbus, Ohio have started since then. But some other health agencies have declined, citing uneasiness with the tests' accuracy. "There's been little research on whether tests strips are effective," said Catherine McGowan, professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. "Anything that empowers people who inject drugs to mitigate their own risk is a good thing," McGowan said. "You just need to be really careful."

    THE ORIGIN

    The tests strips are intended for testing the urine of patients who are legally prescribed fentanyl for pain, as a way for doctors to make sure they are taking the drug, said Iqbal Sunderani, the chief executive of BTNX, the Canadian company that is a main producer of the strips. The strips are not licensed for any use in the United States. In 2016, a Canadian doctor devised a new way to apply them: by dipping them into the residue of "cooker" cups that heroin users employ to prepare their injections. A facility in Vancouver that allows people to use drugs under medical supervision started offering the tests two years ago. Last year, health officials there released results of a study of more than 1,000 drug checks. More than 80 percent of heroin and crystal meth samples tested positive for fentanyl, as did 40 percent of cocaine samples. Drug users who got a positive result were 10 times more likely to lower their dose, the study found.

    INTEREST GROWS

    The Vancouver results drew attention. In October 2016, St. Ann's Corner of Harm Reduction in New York City became one of the first U.S. programs to offer them. It was important to take new steps, said Van Asher, the Bronx organization's syringe access program manager. "We're losing people at a greater rate than we were at the height of HIV" in the early 1990s, he said. A few small studies have shown a high willingness by drug users to use the tests. Perhaps the most important was a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins University and Brown University, which was not published in a peer-reviewed journal but was released to the public in February. It concluded the test strips were highly accurate. BTNX doesn't recommend the strips for testing illicit drugs, but company knows it has become the main driver of sales. "It sold 117,000 tests in the U.S. last year. So far this year it has already sold more than 410,000," he said.

    THE DOUBTERS

    A growing list of government agencies in Canada and the United States are paying for the strips, but others have been reluctant. Dr. Elinore McCance-Katz, a point person in the Trump administration's response to the nation's opioid epidemic, said she doubts positive test results deter people from shooting up. "I don't think they're going to be using fentanyl test strips and say 'Oh gee, this is positive for fentanyl? I better go find something else,'" said McCance-Katz, who heads the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Strip proponents agree: Most heroin addicts won't walk away from their drugs, no matter what a test result says. "In the whole time I've been doing this, I've had only three people throw out positive samples," said Tino Fuentes, an overdose-prevention outreach worker who has become a kind of Johnny Appleseed in the U.S. for test strips, promoting and handing them out in multiple cities.

    But Fuentes and others say the strips can nevertheless get people to reduce their chance of a fatal overdose, for example by taking smaller doses or taking drugs in the presence of someone who has an overdose-reversal drug. Fuentes said he was delighted when he learned of two people who recently stopped using the strips because they decided to treat every dose as contaminated and to take precautions every time. "The ideal thing is we no longer need strips because people are using safely," he said.

    FALSE NEGATIVES

    Some health officials worry that there's a chance that the test strips will fail to detect certain contaminants. Late last year, Canada's national health agency said a preliminary analysis of 70 samples found three in which the test failed to detect fentanyl or fentanyl analogs. A follow-up analysis by Health Canada found BTNX strips produced five false negatives among 364 samples tested. In Washington, D.C., the health department has declined to pay for them or endorse their use "based on the high likelihood of false negatives," said department official Michael Kharfen. Some outreach workers understand the caution, noting for example the test strips detect the presence of fentanyl, but not how much. "It could be 2 percent or 98 percent. And the difference will kill you," said Reilly Glasgow, who works at New York City's Lower East Side Harm Reduction Center, which is part of an organization called the Alliance for Positive Change. But he said his program was finally persuaded to offer the strips because too many people didn't believe any fentanyl could be in their drugs. "They needed proof," he said.

    'THERE IS NO SECOND LINE'

    Fentanyl contamination has become so common that one New York man joked that his drug habit has become "a little bit of heroin but mostly fentanyl." The man said he's been injecting heroin since 1992 and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because he didn't want to jeopardize his ability to get housing, to keep his place in a treatment program or to land a job. He said the test strips are hard to come by, but he's used them — usually when he bought drugs from a new dealer. All those tests were positive. He said he took the drugs anyway, starting with a smaller dose called a "tester shot." One day last month, he demonstrated how the test strips worked on a packet of heroin powder stamped with a blue devil on the side, which he bought from his regular dealer. He called the dealer's product "consistently mediocre." It's a selling point, since it means he knows what he's getting "as opposed to playing Russian roulette."

    https://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireSt...aking-57871834

    -----

    Remission of severe Opioid Use Disorder with ibogaine: a case report


    Laurie Cloutier-Gill, Evan Wood, Trevor Millar, Caroline Ferris, M. Eugenia Socias

    Background

    Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) translates into major health, social, and economic consequences. Opioid agonist medications, which generally require long-term administration, are the mainstay pharmacological treatment of OUD. But a large proportion of individuals with OUD either refuse or fail to respond to these therapies. Ibogaine, a naturally occurring substance found in the Tabernanthe iboga plant, has demonstrated potential to bring about long-term abstinence. Although research is limited, an ibogaine subculture persists in offering unregulated ibogaine preparations for the treatment of addiction.

    Case presentation

    Here we describe the case of a 37-year-old female with a 19-year history of severe OUD achieving an ongoing 18-month period of abstinence following a four-day ibogaine treatment. Her previous longest period of continuous abstinence from opioids was 2 months while on methadone. No safety issues associated with ibogaine were observed.

    Conclusions

    A four-day treatment with ibogaine was successful in achieving long-term remission of a previously treatment-refractory patient with severe OUD. While rigorous trials are required to establish safety and efficacy, future studies should seek to delineate the potential role of ibogaine or other molecules that may produce transformative experiences for individuals with substance use disorder.

    ---

    In North America, an estimated 1 million individuals are affected by Opioid Use Disorder (OUD). These figures translate into major health and societal costs. Overdose, suicide, end-stage liver disease, psychiatric illnesses, as well as increased risk of Hepatitis C (HCV) and HIV infection are frequent health consequences of untreated OUD. The economic burden of OUD is also large, including health care costs, loss in productivity and criminal justice expenditures.

    At present, methadone and buprenorphine are the gold standard treatment for OUD. Methadone Maintenance Therapy (MMT) has been shown to effectively reduce heroin use, as well as improve the physical and mental health status of those in treatment. however, many patients are unwilling to take daily OAT or do not respond to these treatments. For instance, some studies report that up to 40% of individuals with OUD have an unfavorable response to MMT. Furthermore, previous studies show that MMT programs fail to meet needs and preferences of many opioid users. The limited efficacy of OAT could be in part related to the need for long-term adherence to therapy. Thus, further research and development of new treatment programs for OUD is warranted to better meet the needs of individuals with OUD for whom available treatment options have failed or are unsuitable.

    Ibogaine is an alkaloid found in the Tabernanthe iboga root bark, used in initiatory rituals in West Central Africa. Since the 1960s, anecdotal evidence has suggested its potential to treat addictions without the need for ongoing administration. Evidence of ibogaine's anti-addictive properties is supported by pre-clinical and observational studies. However, ibogaine's toxicity profile, including fatalities temporally-associated with its ingestion, have hampered subsequent clinical research on ibogaines anti-addictive properties.

    Although ibogaine is a Schedule I substance in the United States, it is unregulated in most countries, including Canada. Dozens of clinics worldwide are hence offering ibogaine for the treatment of addictions in both non-medical and medical settings. For instance, as of February 2006, it was estimated that 3414 individuals had taken ibogaine. Of those, 68 percent had used it for the treatment of a substance use disorder and most commonly for opioid detoxification (53 percent).

    We present a case of a woman with long standing severe OUD and a history of multiple previous unsuccessful treatments. Eighteen months after a short treatment course with ibogaine, she remains abstinent from opioids.

    CASE REPORT

    A 37-year-old Caucasian woman was referred to the Addiction Outpatient Clinic at St-Pauls hospital in Vancouver for follow-up of her OUD remission subsequent to a 4-day treatment with ibogaine 18 months prior. She had been addicted to heroin since she was 18 years old. Before undergoing her ibogaine treatment, the patient repeatedly tried and exhausted most available addiction treatment options, including 12-step programs, detoxification centers, support groups, sponsors, recovery houses and MMT, all without sustained success.

    As previously stated, 18 months prior to this consultation the patient was admitted to a residential ibogaine program in Vancouver to receive ibogaine therapy for her OUD. She had last used opioids (16 mg of hydromorphone) approximately 12 hours prior to admission to the centre. The centers protocol involved a series of ibogaine HCl test doses (up to 2.5 mg/kg) on the first day, followed by a series of larger doses (up to 20 mg/kg) on the second day, and booster doses on the last 2 days (5 mg/kg/day). Over the course of the four-day admission, she received a total of 2300 mg of ibogaine HCl. The clinic's protocol also allowed for the use of oral hydromorphone to manage acute withdrawal. The patient required 32 mg of hydromorphone on the first day and 45 mg on the second day to manage her withdrawal symptoms which were already present on admission.

    During the ibogaine treatment, the center provided continuous nursing monitoring of heart rate and blood pressure. The clinic's safety protocol included liver and cardiovascular screening prior to the initiation of the ibogaine treatment. The patients baseline ECG was within normal parameters, including a normal QTc.

    The patient maintained an overall stable blood pressure during the 4-day treatment, but developed mild bradycardia (average measured heart rate on day 1, 2, 3, 4 was 67 beats per minute [bpm], 57 bpm, 51 bpm, and 57 bpm respectively). In addition, she experienced mild and transitory side effects such as weakness, dizziness, and diaphoresis. Minor concentration deficits were reported during the first few weeks following therapy, but the patient did not suffer from any other overt persistent side effects. At the time of this consultation, the patient denied any opioid use since she left the ibogaine clinic 18 months ago.

    She attributed her sustained recovery more to the spiritual awakening induced by the ibogaine experience than to a painless withdrawal, as she had been able to go trough physical withdrawals successfully on various occasions in the past without subsequent sustained abstinence. The patient described that the ibogaine experience allowed her to revisit various recent events of her life, including the loss of her partner to an opioid overdose, as well as other moments where the patient herself suffered nearly fatal overdoses. This new insight into her OUD, became an eye-opening opportunity, giving her emotional strength to attempt and sustain abstinence.

    DISCUSSION

    Ibogaine shows potential as an alternative treatment for OUD, particularly among cases refractory to OAT for a number of reasons. First, studies have suggested that ibogaine is effective in easing opioid withdrawal, as well as in reducing cravings. Although the pharmacological bases of ibogaines anti-addictive properties are not fully understood, ibogaine and noribogaine act on a diversity of neurotransmitter transporters and receptors provides a biological plausibility for its anti-addictive effects. Second, ibogaine is usually administered in a single session, not requiring ongoing administration, which can be a substantial advantage for many individuals with OUD. Without the time and logistical constraints commonly associated with daily-witnessed ingestion of methadone, individuals could have an easier transition back to employment and other factors associated with recovery, which in turn could reduce direct and indirect societal costs. Third, it has been suggested the mystical experiences associated with ibogaine might result in the resetting of psychological processes or neuroadaptations underlying substance use disorders, which could contribute to long-term abstinence. Our patient volunteered that it was such transformative phenomenon that was the key to her success this time. Fourth, ibogaine has a low abuse potential, as indicated by animal models where ibogaine did not lead to either desire for the substance or aversion to it.

    Despite these promising characteristics of ibogaine, clinical research on its potential for the treatment of subtance use disorders has been hindered due in part to safety concerns. However, this research gap has resulted in a lack of evidence-based clinical and standards for how to safely administer ibogaine. 22 deaths related to ibogaine have been reported, most of which were associated with pre-existing medical conditions (particularly cardiovascular disease), concurrent use of other substances, and electrolyte imbalances. Clinical reports and studies suggest that cardiac arrhythmias, induced by ibogaine's propensity to prolong the QT interval, might have been responsible for many of these deaths. As such, ibogaines safe administration would theoretically dictate, amongst other safety measures, the need for an electrolytes and ECG screening prior to treatment, abstinence from any other potentially QTc prolonging substances, as well as exclusion of patients with cardiovascular disease.

    In summary, the case presented here illustrates the challenges associated with the treatment of refractory OUD, and underscores the urgent need for expanding options to treat these cases, as well as for other substances (e.g., cocaine) for which pharmacotherapies are currently unavailable. Although ibogaine is a promising compound, its use on individual patients must be based on a risk-benefit analysis, as well as on a careful selection of eligible candidates and ibogaines administration in adequately safe settings. With the growing number of ibogaine users in uncontrolled settings, further clinical research is warranted to clarify the potential role of ibogaine and related congeners (e.g., 18-MC), as well as other molecules that may produce transformative experiences in the treatment of substance use disorders, and to help inform guidelines for their safer administration.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4993099/


    Last edited by mr peabody; 07-10-2018 at 11:21.
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    Oxycodone habit aborted with low dose Ibogaine

    Fred had the rewarding opportunity to sit in on Josh's's detox from 150-180mg/day Oxy (insufflation) habit, duration of 3 months.

    Subjects pre-history w/opiates:

    *1999-2002 heroin habit 1-3gm/day (gaining daily intake by approximate 1gm per year, graduating from sniffing>smoking>shooting in the first year).

    *late 2002 Successful Ibogaine hcl treatment.

    *early 2010 Subject had surgery, resulting in Hydrocodone & Oxycodone habit, tapered down from 100mgs/day to 40mgs/day before a flood of Ibogaine hcl aprox 100 days after surgery, successful results.

    *Mid 2012 subject injured neck in a bike wreck, resulting in the above mentioned recent habit (150-180mg/day Oxy)

    Subject was gradually administered low doses of Iboga 80% TA (total alkaloid extract) in combination with small doses of methadone just prior to anticipated withdrawal symptoms. (Every 8-12 hours)

    Subject metabolizes opiates quite rapidly, thus the methadone was administered in micro doses 2-3x/day. In combo of building up to a flood of the Iboga on day 3, as the Iboga was increased, the methadone was reduced by 1/3 (18-12-6-0), the 4th day being 0 opiates. Total Iboga amount required 470mg, spread across 5 days, with a peak of 200mg on day 3 (60-100-200-60-50).

    Extreme care and calculations based on providers experience and open/honest dialogue and agreement with subject assured no risk of overdose, or an overwhelming Iboga experience, as the subject had already been through two single dose Ibogaine complete rebirths, with 12+hours of visuals and no sleep for 36 hours - which was quite overwhelming for the subject. This detox was more like an abortion as opposed to the classic Iboga rebirth.

    The concept of introducing methadone in combo with the Iboga TA was two-fold:

    1. To stabilize the subject from the ping-pong effect of short acting Oxy (going through withdrawals every 2-3 hours) while gently introducing the Iboga into the mix without a major Iboga experience.

    2. Limited resources, Iboga is a precious sacred medicine!

    Subject was able to sleep about 4-5 hours/night the first 2 nights with the administration of low doses of Valium, melatonin, L-Trytophan and 5-HTP. Sleep became an obstacle after the flood on day 3, getting only 2 hours of sleep, leaving subject a bit tattered on day 4, but hung in like a champ and got 4 hours sleep the following night.

    Surprise surprise! During day 4 the subject was quite restless and was offered a small amount of cannabis (less than 1/20th/gm). This helped subject relax for a few minutes but then began to potentiate the Iboga (or vice-versa) and led to a 3 hour tearful cathartic experience - including visuals - illustrating the subject's traumas, failures, triumphs, lies, truths and challenges in life. Although subject was not comfortable with the process, literally 8-10 years peeled away from subject's face. As the processing subsided, subject was left with a deep calm, in spite of the challenges to be faced moving forward.

    FYI, The cannabis was a Sativa variety - Dutch Treat. Had an Indica strain been available, the cannabis would have had a more sedating effect. It is Freds opinion that Sativa varieties of cannabis have what Fred refers to as the truth serum effect, in addition to visualization, and psychoactive properties.

    Subject is quite clear on day 5, was able to go food shopping and a short walk in nature, and has a complete 180 degree view on life and purpose moving forward. Aftercare plans include ending addictive associations of people, places and things and reaching out to Iboga peers met during previous treatments. Subject is not a 12 stepper, but does not rule out that in case of cravings, and is quite knowledgable with the right supplements and physical activities for a healthy rebound.

    Fred always finds it a blessing and miracle to witness a seemingly hopeless addict transform through the sacred medicine of Iboga. Aside from the spiritual/psychological healing aspects of Iboga are the physiological aspects of how the Ibogaine molecule helps reset/repair the opiate receptors/peptides.

    -3rdStoneFromTheSun


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    Ibogaine treatment for problematic opioid consumption: Short- and long-term outcomes

    A. Davis, A. Windham-Herman, J. Barsuglia, M. Lynch, M. Polanco

    Very few studies have reported the effectiveness of ibogaine as a treatment for chronic opioid use. This study evaluated the acute subjective effects of ibogaine, outcomes on problematic opioid consumption, and the long-term associations with psychological functioning. Using online data collection, 88 patients who received ibogaine treatment in Mexico between 2012 and 2015 completed our survey.

    Most participants (72 percent) had used opioids for at least 4 years and 69 percent reported daily use. Most (80 percent) indicated that ibogaine eliminated or drastically reduced withdrawal symptoms. Fifty percent reported that ibogaine reduced opioid craving, some (25 percent) reporting a reduction in craving lasting at least 3 months. Thirty percent of participants reported never using opioids again following ibogaine treatment. And over one half (54 percent) of these abstainers had been abstinent for at least 1 year, with 31% abstinent for at least 2 years. At the time of survey, 41 percent of all participants reported sustained abstinence (>6 months). Although 70% of the total sample reported a relapse following treatment, 48 percent reported decreased use from pretreatment levels and an additional 11% eventually achieved abstinence. Treatment responders had the lowest rates of depressive and anxious symptoms, the highest levels of subjective well-being and rated their ibogaine treatment as more spiritually meaningful compared with treatment non-responders.

    The results suggest that ibogaine is associated with reductions in opioid use, including complete abstinence, and has long-term positive psychological outcomes. Future research should investigate the efficacy of ibogaine treatment using rigorous longitudinal and controlled designs.

    https://www.stichtingopen.nl/subject...l-functioning/
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    Howard Lotsof


    Ibogaine: Some background
    *

    Credit for discovering ibogaine’s medicinal potential is widely attributed to Howard Lotsof. Ten years before the events that gave rise to Fear and Loathing, Lotsof was a junkie living in New York. Having bought some ibogaine for recreational use, Lotsof was astounded to find that when the psychedelic wore off, he no longer craved heroin. Days passed, and he didn’t experience any of the excruciating symptoms associated with kicking a dope habit.

    Lotsof, who died in 2010 of liver cancer at age 66, devoted his life to making ibogaine available as an addiction treatment. He experienced a significant setback in 1967, when the U.S. government banned the drug, along with several other psychedelics. In 1970 officials categorized ibogaine as a Schedule I substance along with heroin, marijuana, and other drugs that by definition have "a high potential for abuse" and "no currently accepted medical use."

    Eventually, Lotsof shifted his focus and began using ibogaine to treat heroin addicts at a rehab clinic in the Netherlands. In 1985, he obtained a U.S. patent for the use of ibogaine to treat substance abuse.

    By the late ’80s, doctors and scientists were confirming what Lotsof knew: Ibogaine blocks cravings and withdrawal symptoms for many types of drugs, and opiates in particular.

    "Its effects are pretty dramatic," says Dr. Kenneth Alper, a professor of psychiatry at NYU who specializes in addiction research. "I’ve observed this firsthand, and it’s difficult to account for."



    Dr. Stanley Glick


    Dr. Stanley Glick, a pharmacologist and neuroscientist at Albany Medical College, was among the first researchers to test ibogaine on rats. Glick hooked up the rodents to IVs in cages with levers that allowed them to inject themselves with morphine.

    “If the rats do it, you can be pretty sure that humans will, too, given the opportunity,” Glick explains. “It’s really the time-tested model of any human behavior.”

    Strung-out rats dosed with ibogaine stopped pressing the lever that gave them morphine. Glick and other researchers have subsequently replicated the morphine results with other drugs including alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, and methamphetamine. In the early 1990s, Lotsof teamed up with Dr. Deborah Mash, a neurologist and pharmacologist at the University of Miami, to study the effect of ibogaine on people. Mash was granted FDA approval to administer ibogaine in 1993 and was able to test the drug on eight people before the experiment came to an abrupt halt.

    "I was unable to get it funded," Mash says. "We had the rocket ship on the launch pad, with no fuel."

    A few months after the FDA gave Mash the green light, a committee of academics and pharmaceutical-industry professionals assembled by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) concluded that the U.S. government should not fund ibogaine research. Earlier that year, a researcher from Johns Hopkins University had found that rats injected with massive doses of ibogaine suffered irreparable damage to the cerebellum, the part of the brain that controls balance and motor skills. According to Dr. Frank Vocci, former director of treatment research and development at NIDA, the fact that ibogaine increases the risk of seizures for people addicted to alcohol or benzodiazepines such as Valium raised eyebrows as well.

    "The question that was posed to them was, 'Do you think that this could be a project that could result in, essentially, a marketable product?' " Vocci recalls. "There was concern about brain damage, seizures, and heart rate. But it wasn’t so much that the ultimate safety of the drug was being damned, it was just felt that there were an awful lot of warts on this thing."

    Mash and Lotsof soon parted ways, on unfriendly terms. Lotsof sued his former colleague and the University of Miami in federal court in 1996, claiming that her research had infringed on his patent. A judge eventually ruled in favor of Mash and her employer, absolving them of wrongdoing.



    Dr. Deborah Mash


    Mash opened a private clinic on the Caribbean island of St. Kitts and administered ibogaine to nearly 300 addicts. "It really works," Mash says now. "If it didn’t work, I would have told the world 'It doesn’t work.' I would have debunked it, and I would have been the most outspoken leader of the pack. My scientific and professional credibility was on the line."

    Clare Wilkins is one of Howard Lotsof’s proteges. Born in South Africa and raised in Los Angeles, she got hooked on heroin at the age of 20 while majoring in Latin American studies and psychology at Cornell University. Drug use led to depression and she dropped out her senior year. She’d been trying to get clean using methadone for eight and a half years when her younger sister learned about ibogaine via the Internet. Wilkins, then 30 years old, read up on the subject, started saving, and in 2005 shelled out $3,200 for a session at a clinic in Tijuana. The trip changed her life.

    "I received a direct message that I was washed in love," Wilkins says of her first encounter with the psychedelic. "That the universe in its entirety is full of love, and that courses through us and was there for me. There was this soul body, this light body that had no beginning and no end."

    "It got me off methadone completely," she says. "My sense of shame about my addiction was washed away."



    Clare Wilkins


    The experience was so profound that she elected to stay on at the clinic as a volunteer. Wilkins feels she has a knack for guiding patients through their ibogaine-induced spiritual awakenings.

    "On ibogaine, all your walls come down," she says. "You can’t lie. You get an opportunity to look at yourself honestly and see how you respond. My role is to be there as a comfort. People compliment me by saying, 'You knew exactly when to hold my hand.'

    *From the article here: https://exilope.wordpress.com/tag/treatment/
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    How plant medicine saved my life

    I can say with complete conviction that ibogaine and ayahuasca saved my life. After 5 years of destruction and living what could hardly be called a life, I found out about ibogaine. In fact, I wouldn’t even call it living; existing is a much more appropriate term because I wasn’t living, I was slowly killing myself. Heroin addiction felt like a prison, one I never thought I could be free from, so when I received a phone call from my sister telling my about a hallucinogen from Africa that could cure my addition, my whole world changed.

    I set off to Costa Rica for ibogaine treatment. Getting off the plane I was nervous and hopeful but not entirely sure I was ready to leave drugs behind. I had tried everything up to this point; rehabs, Methadone, Suboxone, cold turkey detoxes, a Naltrexone implant in my stomach, halfway homes and none of it worked. It made me feel like I was destined to be an addict forever. My depression also made it difficult for me to believe I deserved a better life.

    "There was something inside of me that constantly reinforced the notion that I just wasn’t fit for life, that there was something inherently wrong with me."

    Ibogaine changed all of that. It’s difficult to describe. I went into treatment not knowing much about the ceremonial or spiritual aspect of it. Being atheist, I was quite skeptical of anything ‘spiritual’. Just that word turned me off, yet I had always been fascinated by ancient religions and ceremonial practices. I didn’t necessarily believe in them, but there was always something that pulled me toward them. I desperately wanted to feel connected to something; I just couldn’t bring myself to buy into the idea of God presented by most organized religions.

    Ibogaine changed something in me. It wasn’t an all at once; I had no epiphanies or revelations. It was gradual, but I could feel it, and it gave me the insight that going home was a bad idea. I skipped out on my return flight and found a family to live with in Costa Rica while I did some more soul searching. I felt like ibogaine had opened this door of opportunity but it was up to me to do the work to get to where I wanted to be, and there was a lot of work to do.

    Less than a week after completing my ibogaine treatment, I went to an ayahuasca ceremony. Ayahuasca is a hallucinogenic brew used by people of the Amazonian region of South America for general healing of the mind, body and spirit. There are no words to describe the peace, empowerment, wholeness and connections I felt during my ayahuasca experience.

    "For the first time in my life, I understood gratitude. I understood love. I understood nature. I understood people. I understood life. I understood God."

    From that night forward, my entire idea of spirituality had changed and I knew I could never go back to the life I used to know.

    Ibogaine and ayahuasca gave me the opportunity to reclaim my freedom and find something I could really believe in. They changed the chemistry of my brain, the way I think, the way I process things, the way I respond to situations, the way I feel about life and, most importantly, the way I feel about myself.

    "I finally, for the first time I can ever remember, feel that life is worth living. I feel proud of whom I am, I feel happy and confident with myself inside and out."

    My depression is gone. I see each new day as a beautiful opportunity, rather than a burden I have to suffer through.

    Ibogaine allowed me to detox painlessly without suffering through withdrawal. It introduced me to the African spiritual tradition Bwiti, which uses iboga as a sacrament and focuses on becoming the best possible version of yourself. Ayahuasca opened my eyes to spirituality, the beauty of life and how to feel gratitude. Together, they allowed me to heal both physically and emotionally and start a new life I could be proud of. Through a lot of determination and hard work, I’ve made it to where I am today. My story is a true testament to the power of both ibogaine and ayahuasca.

    http://newlifeayahuasca.com/how-plan...saved-my-life/
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