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    Indonesia tsunami: Every building destroyed in tiny fishing village 
    #1
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    Fucking tragedy.

    Indonesia tsunami: Every building destroyed in tiny fishing village

    • Key points:
    • Residents in Boya say the entire village has disappeared
    • Mosques have been turned into makeshift morgues
    • Residents are sleeping outside in fear of more earthquakes




    On Friday afternoon, Andi Rainaldi and his wife Flarahanie sat down to a meal of fried banana with extended family at Boya, a tiny waterside village in Donggala in Indonesia's Central Sulawesi.

    As the adults talked, the children played, including the couple's son Endi Rafi Alfariel and their two nieces Sakinah, 6, and Husna, 9.

    That was until the magnitude-7.5 earthquake struck around 6:00pm.

    Donggala was the area closest to the quake's epicentre, about 30 kilometres north. And the village of Boya was one of the worst-hit areas. As the house began shaking, not all residents had time to run outside before their homes collapsed and toppled into the sea.

    The three young children didn't stand a chance.

    Less than half an hour later a powerful tsunami swept in, hitting Boya and the surrounding coastline and washing more buildings into the water. Mr Rainaldi told the ABC the entire village had disappeared. Not a single house was left standing.

    In all, seven members of Andi Rainaldi's family disappeared, including his son, two nieces, his godson and his aunt. All were either trapped and killed under the rubble when the house collapsed, or washed out to sea when the huge waves pounded the shore.

    Mr Rainaldi and his wife spent days searching for their son and relatives. But by yesterday ? when the ABC arrived in Donggala ? they already expected the worst. Several bodies were seen floating in the sea offshore.

    A few hours later the couple found their son's body at the local mosque, which has been turned into a temporary morgue.

    "I couldn't even identify my son by his face, only by his clothes," Mr Rainaldi said.

    "We found him physically unrecognisable.
    -read on
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    #2
    agreed.

    that was one heck of a one two combo, mother nature is scary sometimes.

    good reminder we have more to be thankful for then we think. also more to be cautious of than our own petty squabbles.
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    #3
    A terrible way to go out.
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    #4
    Administrator spacejunk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by invegauser View Post
    that was one heck of a one two combo, mother nature is scary sometimes.
    she keeps getting scarier, more erratic and destructive

    Quote Originally Posted by invegauser View Post
    good reminder we have more to be thankful for then we think. also more to be cautious of than our own petty squabbles.
    indeed. life is tough enough for the people in that part of the world, without having to face horrors like this on top of it.
    ✺✹✺✹BLUA✺✹✺✹
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    #5
    Professor Emeritus TheLoveBandit's Avatar
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    What bugs me is I didn't here shite about this until Monday morning and it isn't like I turned off all media. Something is wrong when something this serious is not given the attention it deserves. I am flabbergasted....my morning radio was the first mention I'd gotten, and it referred to this happening 'last week' (which for Friday evening local was Friday morning my time) and there were ample opportunities for any of my American media to inform me of this. But enough about this not getting attention, I'll turn to the event itself.


    F'n hell this is horrible. I can see the earthquake causing a tsunami, but to imagine an entire village gone...this is devastating. I'm not even sure I can imagine the sense of loss, nor how to approach it from a humanitarian rescue perspective.
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    Tsunami in Indonesia 
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    Sorry - Not another Trump Thread ( Cue, Tainted Love MM cover). Fair enough that Jerry Springer left a void, that can only be replaced by a worthy suitor.

    Actual, significant things happening to people, on our planet.


    Fourteen years ago, Indonesia suffered one of the deadliest disasters in modern history, a 9.1-magnitude earthquake that unleashed a sixty-foot wall of water that killed approximately a hundred and seventy thousand people, many of them in the northern province of Aceh. In the years following, the government invested in preparing for the next catastrophe. In 2008, a disaster-management board was created, which, with the help of foreign governments, including Germany and the United States, built an early-warning system for tsunamis, made up of twenty-two sensor-laden buoys, which cost half a million dollars each and went online the following year. Soon, schools of fish began gathering in the electric fields emitted by the buoys? computers, which drew fishermen, some of whom scrapped the equipment for copper wiring. Other sensors fell into disrepair after funding cuts led to poor maintenance. In 2016, an earthquake in western Indonesia, near Aceh, revealed that none of the buoys worked anymore.

    I moved to Aceh seven years after the tsunami, and one of the first things my hosts did after I arrived was show me an escape route to the hills. Though an influx of international aid had mostly rebuilt the city, I soon learned that its people?almost all of whom had lost friends or family to the wave?had not recovered so easily. Even slight tremors could trigger weeping flashbacks. When one of my friends disappeared?a university student who had seen his mother and sister swept away?it was eventually presumed that he had committed suicide. The Acehnese wisdom about the danger lying beneath their feet was hard-earned.

    Last Friday evening, about fifty miles north of the Indonesian city of Palu, the United States Geological Survey recorded a 7.5-magnitude earthquake along a fault six miles beneath the surface of the island of Sulawesi. Experts have suggested that the earthquake triggered a submarine landslide that forced colossal quantities of water into a long, narrow bay, which channelled it directly at Palu, where the city?s three hundred and eighty thousand inhabitants were enjoying the end of the week, many of them preparing for a beach festival. A video posted to social media showed a man atop a multi-story parking deck yelling desperately to people on the street and beach below, ?Run up here! There?s a tsunami! Run! Run!? All but a few ignored his pleas, as three enormous waves?the tallest of which would later be estimated at twenty feet?thundered across the nearby bay. The first wave swept a row of single-story buildings off their foundations and swamped moving cars. As a second wave reared, the man on the parking deck wept and screamed, ?Heaven forbid, Allah! Allah!? Then he turned and fled.

    The earthquake and the tsunami reduced large portions of Palu to wastelands of pulverized concrete and twisted metal roofing. Because little heavy equipment was available, rescuers struggled to move concrete slabs by hand as people trapped beneath begged for help. In the days since, the death toll has leapt by hundreds daily, reaching more than fourteen hundred on Thursday morning. Jusuf Kalla, the Indonesian Vice-President, has warned that it could grow to thousands. International and domestic aid has struggled to reach the suddenly isolated city, as its airport runway and many of its inbound roads and bridges have been destroyed or rendered unusable. In some neighborhoods, authorities have set up rudimentary services, but elsewhere they have simply lost control: more than a thousand inmates have escaped from three jails, one of which was set on fire, and looters have attacked A.T.M.s with pickaxes. Reports have just begun to trickle in from nearby villages, some of which, it seems, have been nearly obliterated.

    Even as Indonesian authorities struggled to respond to the aftermath of the disaster, they endured withering criticism for failing to adequately prepare Palu beforehand. Indonesia?s tsunami-warning system employs more than a hundred tidal-gauge sensors, but none were close enough to Palu to pick up the localized wave. Authorities had issued a tsunami warning for the area, based off readings from seismographic sensors, but Gavin Sullivan, an associate professor at Coventry University who studies disaster preparation and recovery in Indonesia, told me, ?Many people at the beach and on the [bayside] road had no idea the wave was coming at all.? The city is equipped with tsunami sirens, but the earthquake had knocked out their power, meaning that residents, such as the man on the parking deck, had to shout warnings themselves. A text-message alert also system failed to activate, because many cell-phone towers had already been destroyed. ?There was a chance for the Indonesian government to be better prepared for disasters like this,? Louise Comfort, a disaster-management expert at the University of Pittsburgh who leads a project to help Indonesia prepare for tsunamis, said. ?That makes the current devastation all the more heartbreaking.?

    At a press conference, Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, a spokesman for the Indonesian disaster-management board, said, ?The threat of disasters increases, disasters increase, but the budget decreases.? (A 6.9-magnitude earthquake killed more than four hundred and sixty people on islands southwest of Sulawesi, in August.) He acknowledged that he had found out about the Palu tsunami through social media and TV.

    ?Indonesia is a developing country, and it is difficult to allocate the resources, but we have to be ready for the worst-case scenario,? Saut Sagala, a professor at the Bandung Institute of Technology and a senior fellow at the Indonesian Resilience Development Initiative, said. One dire possibility is an earthquake or tsunami striking the greater metropolitan area of Indonesia?s capital, Jakarta, where about twenty-eight million people strain an already overburdened infrastructure. ?If the government does not invest more on disaster risk reduction and increase the preparedness of the communities, we will not be ready for these disasters,? Sagala said. Among other things, he said, the government should work to educate the population about disaster preparedness, retrofit buildings with seismic-shock absorbers, stockpile resources, and use city planning to steer people away from vulnerable areas. The Indonesian populations that are best prepared for disasters, Sagala added, are those that have already suffered one.

    Comfort, the University of Pittsburgh professor, said that when she visited Aceh province after the 2004 tsunami she was horrified to hear stories of ?people running down to the beach to look at all the exposed fish when the water drew back after the earthquake,? not understanding that it was the first sign of an impending tsunami. ?Of course, they got caught in the oncoming wave.? But, though residents of Aceh now know to flee for high ground after an earthquake, the Indonesian government seems to have more quickly forgotten the lessons of the disaster. Comfort?s experience with the 2004 tsunami inspired her, along with a team of American and Indonesian researchers, to develop a new type of sensor to provide tsunami warnings. Unlike the German buoys, which transmit data every fifteen minutes, and so probably wouldn?t have been able to provide adequate forewarning of the Palu tsunami even if they were operational, the new sensors would provide updates within one to three minutes. And because they are situated on the seafloor, they are protected from vandalism. The Indonesian government was originally interested in using Comfort?s sensors, but the construction of a prototype in western Indonesia had recently stalled for lack of funding, with just a few more kilometres of undersea cable needed for it to be completed. ?There was a meeting a little more than a week before the tsunami,? Comfort said. ?But the relevant agencies decided they didn?t have the funding.?

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    Despite the ongoing tragedy, Comfort still has hope that the Indonesian government can be more prepared for the next disaster. The data from the system her team has developed could prove helpful to other nations facing similar threats, for example, which might be enough to convince the international community to share some of its costs. ?Tsunamis are a global risk,? she said. ?Portions of the United States, like Los Angeles and Seattle, as well as other cities, like Mumbai, in India, and Darwin, in Australia, are just as vulnerable as Palu to tsunamis. As populations worldwide concentrate in coastal cities, everyone needs to be prepared.


    https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-...ithout-warning
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    #7
    Bluelighter SheWasLvL18's Avatar
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    At a press conference, Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, a spokesman for the Indonesian disaster-management board, said, ?The threat of disasters increases, disasters increase, but the budget decreases.? (A 6.9-magnitude earthquake killed more than four hundred and sixty people on islands southwest of Sulawesi, in August.) He acknowledged that he had found out about the Palu tsunami through social media and TV.
    It's crazy how fast it all must have happened. Unfortunate too for the people living knowing it would eventually happen again
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    #8
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    ^ . On the worst of days, it's difficult not to feel grateful to live on a 'luckier' landmass, fwiw.
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    #9
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    Mashed these threads together

    Quote Originally Posted by TheLoveBandit View Post
    What bugs me is I didn't here shite about this until Monday morning and it isn't like I turned off all media. Something is wrong when something this serious is not given the attention it deserves. I am flabbergasted....my morning radio was the first mention I'd gotten, and it referred to this happening 'last week' (which for Friday evening local was Friday morning my time) and there were ample opportunities for any of my American media to inform me of this. But enough about this not getting attention, I'll turn to the event itself.


    F'n hell this is horrible. I can see the earthquake causing a tsunami, but to imagine an entire village gone...this is devastating. I'm not even sure I can imagine the sense of loss, nor how to approach it from a humanitarian rescue perspective.
    It boggles the mind. In truth, it is so hard to comprehend, so distant from the peace of our western lives. And yep, the lack of media attention is/was telling. I guess media content does reflect the desires of consumers to some extent, so it really has symbolic weight in that sense- what does this say about our societies? Even the geographical proximity of Australia to Indonesia hasn't made much difference, this was a 3rd/4th feature on the nightly news for a few days before slowly drifting off. I haven't heard much at all about it since then.
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    #10
    Bluelighter zephyr's Avatar
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    I heard nothing at all about this.

    Nothing.
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