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    #26
    Bluelighter mr peabody's Avatar
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    Ibogaine alkaloid congener 18-MC decreases nicotine self-administration in rats

    Amir Rezvania, Marty Cauley, Susan Slade. Corinne Wells, Stanley Glick, Jed Rose, Edward Levina

    The ibogaine derivative 18-MC has been found to decrease self-administration of morphine, nicotine and alcohol in rats. The current study evaluated the effect of oral 18-MC dosing in rats on alcohol and nicotine self-administration. At weekly intervals they were administered by oral gavage doses of 18-MC following a repeated measures counterbalanced design twice. Acute oral 18-MC significantly reduced nicotine self-administration. Rats with lower baseline performance showed a significant reduction in nicotine self-administration with the 40 mg/kg dosage, while those in the higher baseline group did not show a significant effect of 18-MC. In the alcohol studies, the effects of the same doses of 18-MC were tested in both male and female alcohol preferring rats that had free access to water and alcohol 6 h/day. The results show that 18-MC dose-dependently reduced alcohol intake in both male and female rats. All doses caused significant reductions in alcohol self-administration. These data found that 18-MC is significantly effective in reducing alcohol intake and nicotine self-administration.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27984095

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    Longtime smokers kick the habit with help from magic mushrooms

    Johns Hopkins researchers report that a small number of longtime smokers who had failed numerous attempts to kick the habit have successfully quit smoking with the aid of psilocybin.

    The abstinence rate for study was 80%, with 12 of the 15 participants remaining smoke free after six months, a rate much higher than typical in smoking cessation trials, according to Matthew W. Johnson, associate professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Just 2 or 3 experiences with the psychedelic drug helped a dozen long-term smokers quit, succeeding in a study where numerous other approaches failed.

    “Quitting smoking isn’t a simple biological reaction to psilocybin, as with other medications that directly affect nicotine receptors,” Johnson says. “When administered after careful preparation and in a therapeutic context, psilocybin can lead to deep reflection about one’s life and spark motivation to change.”

    10 men and 5 women, all mentally and physically healthy, participated in the study. The average age of the study participants was 51; they smoked, on average, 19 cigarettes a day for 31 years; and had repeatedly tried and failed to stop smoking. Ten participants reported minimal past use of psychedelics, with the most recent use being an average of 27 years before study intake. Five had never used psychedelics.

    After informing subjects about what their experience with the drug might be like, the first dose of psilocybin was administered by pill the day each participant planned to quit smoking. Two subsequent sessions, with higher doses of the mind-altering drug, were held two weeks and eight weeks later.

    During each psilocybin session, which lasted six to seven hours, participants were closely monitored by 2 members of the research team in a comfortable, homelike setting. Most of the time, participants wore eyeshades and earphones that played music, and they were encouraged to relax and focus on their inner experiences.

    The hallucinogenic compound was administered as part of a comprehensive cognitive behavior therapy smoking cessation program that included weekly one-on-one counseling sessions and techniques such as keeping a diary before quitting in order to assess when and why cravings occur.

    The researchers, who are part of a team that has long had federal funding to study the psychoactive effects of psychedelic drugs, suggest psilocybin may help break the addictive pattern of thoughts and behaviors that have become ingrained after years of smoking. The benefits also seem to last after the drug has worn off.

    Johnson’s next study will compare smoking success rates for people who take psilocybin to those for people who use nicotine patches. He will use MRI scans to study brain activity in participants.

    https://nutritionreview.org/2014/12/...gic-mushrooms/
    Last edited by mr peabody; 26-09-2018 at 04:54.
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    #27
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    Iboga therapy for nicotine addiction

    Joseph Mahfouz

    Every GP in Britain will know patients, friends, or even family who want to stop smoking but find it impossible to do so due to being addicted to tobacco. Although hypnotherapy can be very useful in treating tobacco addiction, it only addresses the psychological aspect of the addiction – not the physiological addiction that keeps so many nicotine users addicted years after they make up their minds to stop.

    A little-known traditional medicine that interrupts dependence on nicotine and alleviates cravings by stopping withdrawal symptoms is found in the botanical kingdom. This medicine acts to interrupt nicotine addiction without noticeable psychological or physical effects – allowing tobacco addicts a window of freedom from physiological dependence. With a little willpower they can then overcome their addiction completely and stop smoking permanently. This medicine, from a west African tree called Iboga, has been a central part of spirituality for the people of western Central Africa for millennia. The medicinal active constituents derived from the root of this tree are several alkaloids, predominantly ibogaine.

    Since the discovery of Ibogaine by Howard Lotsof – who found it to be a chemical dependence interrupter and the most effective treatment for opiate addiction in 1962, extensive peer-reviewed clinical and academic research has been done on ibogaine, underwriting the efficacy of its practical application in addiction therapy. Independent Iboga treatment clinics have been established in Canada, the Netherlands, Mexico, South Africa and New Zealand, while underground iboga therapy is occasionally found elsewhere. However, due primarily to emphasis on treating addiction to heroin and cocaine, its ability to effectively interrupt nicotine addiction and craving at sub-threshold dosages is still virtually unheard of.





    Dependence is defined as “how difficult it is for the user to quit, the relapse rate, the % of people who become dependent, the rating users give their need for the substance, and the degree to which the substance is used in the face of evidence that it causes harm.” According to this definition, nicotine has a higher danger of dependence than alcohol, cocaine or heroin. The Royal College of Physicians’ 2000 report on nicotine addiction concludes that: “Cigarettes are highly efficient nicotine delivery devices, as addictive as heroin or cocaine.” Furthermore, the addition of additives to artificially increase addiction is a standard practice in the tobacco industry.

    2/3 of smokers start before age 18. In 2014, just over a half reported that they had tried to give up smoking. Of those who have tried smoking tobacco, 1/3 to 1/2 will become addicted. 60% of smokers say they would find it difficult to go a single day without smoking and 70% have their first cigarette within an hour of waking.

    Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) research has shown that the total cost to society of tobacco-related harm in England alone is approximately GBP 13.9 billion per year. In 2014-15 the UK Government received CBP 9.5 billion in revenue from tax on tobacco. In 2012-13 the Government spent GBP 87.7 million on services to help people stop smoking and GBP 58.1 million on medication to help people stop smoking.

    So the often-repeated slogan that tobacco users contribute more in taxation than the financial cost of tobacco use to society is a “convenient” myth. A 50-year study has shown that 1/2 to 2/3 of lifelong cigarette smokers will be eventually killed by their habit. Every year +/- 96,000 people in the UK die from diseases directly caused by smoking tobacco.





    Iboga's psychoactive effects are completely absent at the low dosages necessary to inhibit nicotine addiction. Iboga is not considered a recreational drug, and it has no potential for recreational use or abuse. Confirmed anecdotal reports indicate that around one gram of dried Iboga rootbark material when eaten effectively stops nicotine craving and interrupts the physiological addiction of tobacco for approximately 12 hours, with no other noticeable effects. If repeated for a few consecutive days – around a week – the physical withdrawal and associated craving for nicotine will be completely absent during this time. The absence of nicotine from the bloodstream then allows the tobacco addiction to be vanquished.

    https://dogta137.files.wordpress.com/2016/11/iboga.pdf
    Last edited by mr peabody; 30-09-2018 at 04:34.
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    #28
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    CBD found to reduce cigarette consumption

    Morgan CJ, Das RK, Joye A, Curran HV, Kamboj SK

    The role of the endocannabinoid system in nicotine addiction is being increasingly acknowledged. This randomised double blind placebo controlled study set out to assess the impact of the ad-hoc use of cannabidiol (CBD) in smokers who wished to stop smoking. 24 smokers were randomised to receive an inhaler of CBD or placebo for one week, they were instructed to use the inhaler when they felt the urge to smoke. Over the treatment week, placebo treated smokers showed no differences in number of cigarettes smoked. In contrast, those treated with CBD significantly reduced the number of cigarettes smoked by ~40% during treatment. Results also indicated some maintenance of this effect at follow-up. These preliminary data, combined with the strong preclinical rationale for use of this compound, suggest CBD to be a potential treatment for nicotine addiction that warrants further exploration.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23685330

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    Could "magic mushrooms" help you stop smoking?

    A new study examined whether psilocybin could help long-time smokers put down their butts for good.

    Once dismissed as a remnant of '60s counterculture, and eventually banned as a Schedule I drug, psilocybin—the naturally-occurring psychedelic compound found in certain species of mushrooms, thus earning them the sobriquet "magic mushrooms"—has in recent years been ushered to the forefront of medical and psychological research for its reported efficacy in treating any number of health conditions, including depression and alcoholism.

    Now, a new study suggests that psilocybin may also help to curb smoking, as evidenced by the results of six years of research involving smokers who had tried and failed to quit smoking on multiple occasions.

    The study found that through controlled psilocybin use and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), more than half of the participants had successfully quit smoking after a six-month period—a higher rate of abstinence than with CBT alone, according to researchers.

    The study, conducted by researchers from Johns Hopkins University, involved 15 study participants—10 men and 5 women, all at an average age of 51, and who smoked, on average, slightly less than a full pack (19 cigarettes) daily for 31 years. All had attempted to stop smoking on previous occasions, but had failed.

    The study authors administered treatment to the participants and then followed up with them over a period of six years, between 2009 and 2015.

    The treatment consisted of carefully controlled and monitored psilocybin use in conjunction with CBT. After a period of more than two years, the researchers invited the participants to take part in a follow-up interview to determine if and how the treatment affected their smoking. Twelve of the original 15 participants took part in the interview.

    What researchers found was that the 12 participants had not only succeeded in complete smoking cessation after six months, but also experienced a host of additional emotional and psychological responses to the treatment.

    Participants said that through a combination of the treatment, counseling, a "strong rapport" with the study team, and a sense of momentum after taking part in the study all contributed to their achieving abstinence.

    They also reported "gaining vivid insights into self-identity and reasons for smoking" from the psilocybin treatment, and the sense of "interconnectedness, curiosity and awe" continued after the treatment had ended. Participants also said that they felt an array of "persistent" positive feelings, including "increased aesthetic appreciation, altruism, and pro-social behavior" as a result of their participation.

    The researchers concluded that the results of their study underscored the value in continuing research into what some have labeled "psychedelic therapy," and recommended future research trials.

    Their findings also supported previous study findings by Johns Hopkins researchers, which suggested that lifetime smokers treated with psilocybin experienced twice the rate of abstinence than those who used the FDA-approved drug Chantix.

    https://www.thefix.com/could-magic-m...u-stop-smoking
    Last edited by mr peabody; 15-10-2018 at 01:22.
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    #29
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    Iboga and nicotine

    Iboga will help but it will not stop smoking for you. It will however switch off the cravings and give you a chance. It will tell the nicotine to shut the hell up for a little while.

    However you will always have to consider YOUR want for nicotine - not just nicotine's desire to remain within you. It takes 2 to tango. If you fill all the gaps in your life which you normally substitute with tobacco then it's much easier to quit.

    The most important thing is giving yourself permission to take a break. People go out for smoke breaks all the time and nobody bats an eyelid. But 90% of the time they do it to move away from stress, rest for a bit, then move back, under the auspices of having a smoke. So give yourself permission to relax anyway, without a crutch.

    Also, switch to additive free rolling tobacco (e.g. American Spirit) so you can eliminate the addiction to the additives in cigarettes.

    Find the original trigger point of your nicotine craving. It originates at the amygdala. It will feel like this really silent pulse; this pulse activates a cascade of things and then you start getting the feeling of really needing a smoke. It can be as long as 0.25 seconds between that pulse and the emotional response although usually it is nearly instantaneous.

    That silent pulse is the killswitch to the addiction. Switch this off (it's VERY easy) and the addiction will disappear like it was never there, zero withdrawals. The Allen Carr method teaches you how to sense this and observe it clearly, which is why it works. It didn't work for you because your perception of the book did not lead you to isolating that pulse.

    Once you do see and behold with clarity this amygdala spark, the addiction is nothing. Deciding not to trigger this pulse is no different to wiggling your finger.

    So to summarise, this is what you will feel:

    [smoking-related cue OR ~1hr since last cig] => (silent amygdala pulse) => blood flow change => emotions change => voice in mind says "I need a cigarette"

    The whole process happens very fast but every craving has a beginning, so it's easy to find. Also you must eliminate all smoking related cues for around 2 weeks: do not hang around smokers, or drinkers for that while, do not try to smell smoke or see a lit or unlit cigarette. Do not write yourself a check that your willpower can not and will not cash.

    This reduces the fight down to a single repeating cue: the one you get each time nicotine levels in your body drop to a threshold where they no longer satisfy and consequently the amygdala signals it's time for a smoke.

    -embracethevoid

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    Quitting cigarettes may be harder than quitting heroin


    By Candy Lashkari

    It may be tougher to quit smoking cigarettes compared to beating a heroin addiction. An Australian study found that many long term smokers have tried to quit 7.4 times but are still unable to do so. Sydney GP Raymond Seidler actually feels that people do not realize that quitting smoking is just as bad as kicking heroin out of your life.

    "What smokers don't realise is that nicotine addiction is as, or even more powerful, than heroin addiction," he said. "The brain's receptors for smoking are as strongly attached to nicotine as the heroine receptor is to opiates. That can come as a shock to a lot of people. Quitting is therefore a serious challenge for most." said Dr Seidler.

    A recent survey commissioned by Pfizer Australia had responses from over 2,000 smokers which revealed that smokers are much more likely to find chores to do rather than approach a health care professional to help them kick the butt. Amongst the respondents 35% would rather clean the house, 27% would rather pay the bills, 22% would rather go
    to work on the weekend and 18% would rather go to dinner with the in-laws to avoid visiting a health care professional.

    "We need to study why people are reluctant to go to a professional to get help, because we know that GPs and pharmacists have an important role to play in supporting patients who want to quit smoking," said Dr Seidler.

    In the survey, 28% were unsure of how the health care professional could help them quit smoking cigarettes. The smokers in New South Wales were the least likely to seek help from experts. 75% of all the respondents had made at least 2 attempts at quitting and been unsuccessful. According to Dr Seidler if more people approached experts they would be able to give up smoking with a greater success rate.

    "The benefits to smokers of seeking professional help perhaps need to be more carefully and persuasively explained." said Dr Seidler.

    In the survey 27% did not want to spend the money on professional help while 17% were worried about being judged. 16% were unable to admit that they have tried to quit and failed, while 12% say that they do have the time to seek professional help. Amongst the respondents 6% even said that their own doctors were unaware that they smoked.


    Last edited by mr peabody; 15-10-2018 at 01:21.
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