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    Psilocybin-assisted treatment of alcoholism


    C is a 59 year-old divorced mother of 2 who had struggled with alcohol since age 15. Her drinking had led to problems including recurrent physical violence, multiple arrests, poor work history, and intermittent homelessness. She had suffered severe abuse in the context of relationships with partners who also drank, including being beaten unconscious and suffering from intracranial bleeding on at least one occasion. She had made several past attempts to stop drinking, with little success. When she volunteered for the psilocybin trial, she had been sober for 11 days.

    During the preparatory phase, C stated a goal of total abstinence, and rated the importance of abstinence and her readiness for abstinence as high, but her confidence in achieving it was low. She said that she wanted to understand why she drank, and hoped that this would help her stay sober. She indicated God's will, forgiveness, humility, (to be) loved, and self-
    control as her most important values, and saw clearly that her drinking was in conflict with these values.

    During her first psilocybin session, she reported that she experienced powerful feelings of sorrow and remorse regarding the course of her life, and particularly concerning her perceived failures as a parent as a result of her drinking. This experience was quite painful, and she believed that she was sobbing uncontrollably during much of this time, although she was actually lying quietly on the couch at the time. After the session, she felt a sense of relief, and said that she had been able to let go of these feelings and experience a sense of forgiveness. She was hopeful that the experience would help her stay sober, and had no desire to drink after the session.

    C remained sober between the first and second session. During the second session, she reported she experienced a visual image of a small child lying broken on the floor. She realized that this child was her, and experienced herself as a 3-year-old child, devastated by abandonment by her father, an issue that she had not discussed in the preparatory sessions. After this, she began to perceive a white light, which she called Gods healing light, and felt a profound sense of love. She felt that she had been healed by this experience, and that she now felt whole and worthy of love.

    In discussing these experiences afterwards, C said that she thought her drinking had been an attempt to escape the painful feelings of being unworthy of love, as well as the painful feelings of shame and loss related to her life as an alcoholic. She had avoided these feelings, believing that she would fall apart if she faced them. Following the sessions, she now felt that she was strong enough to face these feelings, and that she was a whole person, worthy of love. At her most recent follow-up, 5 months after the first psilocybin session, she remained abstinent and continued to feel that her life had been transformed, in spite of the unexpected death of a close family member during the interim.

    https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b68...101.1532979586

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    Ketamine psychedelic therapy for alcohol dependence

    We carried out a controlled clinical trial on the efficacy of ketamine psychedelic therapy (KPT). To determine the efficiency of the treatment, we collected follow-up information on all the patients who had taken part in this study a year after their discharge. According to data, abstinence of more than 1 year was observed in 73 out of 111 people who had undergone the KPT. Thirty people relapsed, and in the control group of 100 patients whose treatment consisted only of conventional methods, only 24 patients remained sober for more than one year. Thus, the follow-up study demonstrated that ketamine-assisted psychedelic therapy increases the efficacy of conventional alcoholism treatment.

    Two-year follow-up data were collected for the 81 patients who had undergone the KPT. According to data, abstinence of more than 2 years was observed in 33 out of these 81 patients. 38 patients had relapsed. We could not obtain two-year follow-up data for 10 patients. Three-year follow-up data were collected for the 42 patients who had undergone KPT. According to data, abstinence of more than 3 years was observed in 14 out of these 42 patients. 24 patients relapsed. The two- and three-year follow-up data are also evidence of the high efficacy of KPT.

    We have worked with KPT since 1985, and have already treated more than 1000 alcoholic patients without any complications. KPT seems to be a safe and effective method of treatment for alcohol dependence. It seems to be an especially powerful tool in Russia, where there was no psychedelic "revolution" in the 60s, where almost nobody knows what "psychedelics" mean, and where almost nobody can even imagine that these drugs can be used for recreation, and for fun. Therefore in Russia, KPT looks particularly unusual and powerful.

    http://fll-italia.it/context.jsp?ID_...11254&area=279

    • • •

    Can ketamine cure alcoholism?

    A radical new therapy which uses the drug ketamine to wipe out booze-related memories could revolutionize how alcohol addiction is treated, scientists say. Researchers at University College London (UCL) are experimenting with a potential ketamine treatment to see if a single, one-off dose can treat the condition. They say there is growing evidence that ketamine, which is used as a recreational narcotic, can have a positive impact on those dealing with alcoholism.

    There is evidence that it could be useful as a treatment for alcoholism, head researcher Ravi Das told the Guardian. "The drug could suppress memory triggers - clinking glasses, the sight of beer, arriving home after work, which create the urge to drink alcohol," he said. "Memories that you form can be hijacked by drugs in some people. If you were an alcoholic you might have a strong memory of being in a certain place and wanting to drink. Those memories get continuously triggered by things in the environment that you cant avoid," Das said. "The main problem is the really high relapse rate after treatment."

    "People can successfully quit using over the short term while they're being monitored in the hospital, but when they return home, they're exposed to those environmental triggers again," he explained.

    https://www.rt.com/uk/375010-radical...py-alcoholism/
    Last edited by mr peabody; 02-10-2018 at 08:02.
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    Ibogaine alkaloid congener 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) found to decrease alcohol intake in rats

    Amir Rezvania, Marty Cauley, Susan Slade. Corinne Wells, Stanley Glick, Jed Rose, Edward Levina

    The ibogaine derivative 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) has been found to decrease self-administration of alcohol in rats after systemic injection. However oral dosing is the preferred route clinically. The current study evaluated the effect of oral 18-MC dosing in rats on alcohol and nicotine self-administration. Acute oral 18-MC, at the 40 mg/kg dosage, significantly reduced nicotine self-administration. Rats with lower baseline performance showed a significant reduction in nicotine self-administration with the 40 mg/kg dosage, while those in the higher baseline group did not show a significant effect of 18-MC. In alcohol studies, the effects of the same doses of 18-MC were tested in both male and female alcohol preferring rats that had free access to water and alcohol 6 h/day. The results show that 18-MC dose-dependently reduced alcohol intake in both male and female rats. All doses caused significant reductions in alcohol self-administration. These data reinforce previous findings that 18-MC is significantly effective in reducing alcohol intake and nicotine self-administration.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27984095


    Last edited by mr peabody; 01-10-2018 at 11:33.
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    LSD treatment for alcoholism gets a new look

    For the past 5 years, Dr. Erika Dyck has been unearthing some intriguing facts related to a group of pioneering psychiatrists who worked in Saskatchewan, Canada in the '50s and '60s.

    Among other things, the University of Alberta history of medicine professor has found records of the psychiatrists' research that indicate a single dose of the hallucinogenic drug LSD, provided in a clinical, nurturing environment, can be an effective treatment for alcoholism.

    Her findings are published this month in the journal Social History of Medicine.

    After perceiving similarities in the experiences of people on LSD and people going through delirium tremens, the psychiatrists undertook a series of experiments. They noted that delirium tremens, also know as DTs, often marked a "rock bottom" or turning point in the behavior of alcoholics, and they felt LSD may be able to trigger such a turnaround without engendering the painful physical effects associated with DTs.

    As it turns out, they were largely correct.

    "The LSD somehow gave these people experiences that psychologically took them outside of themselves and allowed them to see their own unhealthy behavior more objectively, and then determine to change it," said Dyck, who read the researchers' published and private papers and recently interviewed some of the patients involved in the original studies--many of whom had not had a sip of alcohol since their single LSD experience 40 years earlier.

    According to one study conducted in 1962, 65 per cent of the alcoholics in the experiment stopped drinking for at least a year-and-a-half (the duration of the study) after taking one dose of LSD. The controlled trial also concluded that less than 25 per cent of alcoholics quit drinking for the same period after receiving group therapy, and less than 12 per cent quit in response to traditional psychotherapy techniques commonly used at that time.

    Published in the Quarterly Journal for Studies on Alcohol, the 1962 study was received with much skepticism. One research group in Toronto tried to replicate the results of the study,
    but wanted to observe the effect of LSD on the patients in isolation, so they blindfolded or tied up the patients before giving them the drug. Under such circumstances, the Toronto researchers determined LSD was not effective in treating alcoholism.

    The Saskatchewan group argued that the drug needed to be provided in a nurturing environment to be effective. However, the Toronto researchers held more credibility than the Saskatchewan researchers--who were led by a controversial, British psychiatrist, Dr. Humphry Osmond--and the Saskatchewan group's research was essentially buried.

    But Dyck believes there is value in the Saskatchewan group's experiments.

    "The LSD experience appeared to allow the patients to go through a spiritual journey that ultimately empowered them to heal themselves, and that's really quite an amazing therapy regimen," Dyck said. "Even interviewing the patients 40 years after their experience, I was surprised at how loyal they were to the doctors who treated them, and how powerful they said the experience was for them--some even felt the experience saved their lives."

    In spite of the promise LSD showed as psychotherapy tool, its subsequent popularity as a street drug, and the perception of it as a threat to public safety, triggered a worldwide ban in the late 1960s--including its use in medical experiments. However, the ban on its use in medical experiments appears to be lifting, Dyck noted. A few groups of researchers in the U.S., including a team at Harvard, have recently been granted permission to conduct experiments with LSD.

    "We accept all sorts of drugs, but I think LSD's 'street' popularity ultimately led to its demise," Dyck said. "And that's too bad, because I think the researchers in Saskatchewan, among others, showed that the drug is unique and has some intriguing properties that need to be explored further."

    https://www.brightsurf.com/news/arti...-new-look.html
    Last edited by mr peabody; 19-10-2018 at 00:06.
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    For the past nine years, my life has been ruled by alcoholism. I get the shakes in the morning without my first drink before 10, I hallucinate after about 36 hours without a drink, alcohol has consistently been all I can think about. I have taken LSD about a dozen times. This past weekend, I had the most eye opening trip that I ever experienced. I woke up the next day not wanting a drink. A drink was put in front of me and I couldn't even finish it. I feel my body detoxing and have absolutely no desire to stop it from doing so. I have attempted to get sober from alcohol several times over the past few years. All attempts have been met with extreme cravings to the point of relapse. All of a sudden, I feel free.

    -throwaway921105

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    I have found both psilocybe semilanceatta and cyanescens to be extremely effective in treating alcoholism. I was a hard core drunk for the better part of 15 years. Low doses, .5gm per day, of mushrooms on a daily basis for 30 days saved my life. They helped me get through the DT's, both mentally and physically. I have been sober now for almost two years.

    -Ice House

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    I've noticed that the more frequently I trip (I try to do so once every 2-3 weeks and generally in the 3.5-5g range), the less I drink on a daily basis. I used to drink (this is totally true) a handle of vodka or whiskey EVERY DAY. My body was totally fucked. I'm now down to three or four beers per day and I think I can thank my resurgence in use of psychedelics a year and a half ago to this. Both LSD and specifically mushrooms make me realize how precious life is and how lucky I am to be alive at all, considering I have had problems with heroin and speed in the past, as well. Now I have a strong desire to take much better care of myself. I love myself, now, and I have these little miracles to thank.

    -SunshineDaydream

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    After suffering for years from alcohol addiction, I forced myself to seek ibogaine treatment. Ibogaine's healing properties are unbelievable. I was stunned at how great I felt after the treatment. Cravings and withdrawal were virtually non-existent.

    -Joshua V.

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    How alcohol ruined my life and ibogaine changed it

    Alcohol ruined my life. Period. It’s like looking back, I know why I drank, and knew of course, at least toward the end that I had a problem. My entire waking existence was governed by alcohol. If I wasn’t drunk, then I couldn’t do it. It was simple. In my mind, I lived better when I was drinking. I was a better friend, better mom, better daughter. I worked better when I was drunk, I mean who really wants a sober, quiet bartender, right? Was I an alcoholic before I started working at the bar? Probably not, but I definitely drank. Being a bartender just made it easier. Do I blame my former profession as a bartender for my road to alcoholism? Definitely not.

    I know plenty of people in the industry who are not raging alcoholics. I, as turned out, was just not one of them...

    Ironically, it was while working at the bar I first heard of ibogaine. I was loaded, or course, but loaded was like my sober. Without alcohol I was sick. I couldn't function (I thought) without it. I was, by this time, drinking every morning, shaking and incoherent until I had those first few shots. For some reason, I listened to what this guy across the bar from me was telling me. It wasn’t him that had taken ibogaine, but one of his buddies that, according to him, had succumbed to heroin addiction. I listened, hearing him talk about his friend’s addiction as if he were talking about me. All he needed to do was switch the person and the addiction, and me and this guy could have been the same person. I couldn’t get this conversation out of my mind for weeks, so I decided to do my own research on ibogaine. I sat at the computer for hours that day, seriously feeling that the whole conversation with this guy was part of something so much bigger. The things I read spoke more clearly to me than anything else I’d ever heard about addiction treatment. You couldn’t get me near an AA meeting, and I had no idea there were other options out there. I had no real desire to quit drinking before I read about ibogaine. My girlfriend had left me months before, and my old friends wouldn’t really have anything to do with me. But none of that really seemed to matter to me.

    It was like, that was my fate, and I couldn't have cared less...

    Ibogaine changed all of this. All my research led to this incredible need within to see what this was all about. I can’t explain it more than some crazy act of divine intervention, and it seemed like from the moment I learned about what it was, I knew I had to know more. Not even 2 weeks after I learned more about what it was, I was on a plane to San Diego to head to an ibogaine clinic in Mexico. This, it turns out, has been one of the best decisions I have ever made.

    From the time I arrived until the time I left, I knew I was supposed to be there no matter how surreal the whole experience was. I was sick. I am now well. I was scared. I have lost my fear. Now I see it changed everything, only when I first got to the clinic, I didn't know why I was really there, only that I felt I needed to. Did I think I needed treatment? I must have, even if it wasn’t on a conscious level. I don’t remember thinking oh I'm an alcoholic that needs to get treatment. Not at all. It was more like, I need to see what this is about. I need to know if this is real. There has been nothing more real in my life. Although I choose not to share what my visual experience was like (it is something I feel is sacred and meant only for me), I will say that what I saw during treatment, was everything connected and there was no other place I was supposed to be than in that clinic under the influence of this powerful African root. When it was over I knew I would never drink again. I also knew that I wasn’t losing anything and was gaining everything.

    -anon
    Last edited by mr peabody; 11-10-2018 at 06:50.
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    Quitting alcohol with ibogaine


    Ibogaine is a great aid to quitting alcohol. After your flood dose in the clinic, you'll experience an afterglow that lasts a couple of months. You won't feel the depression associated with
    the alcohol cessation. It will be easier to form new habits, find a new job, and reconstruct your life.

    It will also "reset" your reward pathway, meaning alcohol will call you less and you'll enjoy simpler pleasures, like "birds singing in the trees" more easily. This is made by the GDNF proteins
    iboga increase. If you can get some booster doses at home from the clinic, in an attempt to have the afterglow last longer, you will be aided longer by the plant.

    Great results can also be achieved with small and moderate dosage at home by yourself. In that case, you have to go with smaller dosage and you cannot flood dose like they would do in
    a clinic in a medically supervised setting. I do a small to moderate dosage every 4-5 weeks to benefit from the afterglow which doesn't last as long.

    Try to be on Iboga regularly for 6-12 months. Of course you need to wait a bit after your flood, but if you take a small to moderate dose, you can take some every 4-5 weeks for 1 year.

    -Vapala

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    Could ketamine help treat alcohol dependence?


    Inspired by the promising results seen in Russia, we are now conducting the KARE trial (Ketamine for reduction of Alcoholic Relapse) at the University of Exeter and University College London. In this trial participants are administered ketamine once a week for three weeks. Participants also receive seven sessions of cognitive behavioural therapy to aid their quit attempt and are followed up for six months. Unlike the earlier study, this trial is placebo controlled, thus participants have an equal chance of receiving either ketamine or a matched placebo as well as either cognitive behavioural therapy or alcohol education as a placebo for therapy. It is also double-blind, meaning neither the participant nor the researcher know whether the active treatment or a placebo treatment are administered. This controls for placebo effects and bias due to expectancies of the researcher – putting the original findings to the test with a more rigorous research design.

    Why might ketamine help people stay sober? Recent studies have demonstrated that ketamine has rapid and powerful anti-depressant properties, while people with alcohol problems often also experience symptoms of depression. The direction of the relationship between alcohol problems and depression is not clear, but depressive symptoms are thought to be a common trigger for relapse. Treating people who have alcohol problems with ketamine, therefore, could help them to remain abstinent for longer by lifting their mood.

    Furthermore, lab research has demonstrated that ketamine promotes the growth of new neurons and connections in the brain. These processes are essential to learning and memory, and are suggested to be impaired in both depression and problematic alcohol use. Thus ketamine might make people more receptive and able to plan effectively for the future, which in turn may enhance the effect of psychological therapy.

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/sifting-the-evidence/2018/feb/05/could-ketamine-help-treat-alcohol-dependence.
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    LSD may help treat alcoholism


    The psychedelic drug LSD can help people with alcoholism quit or cut back their drinking, according to a new analysis of data originally collected in the 1960s. The study adds to a renaissance of research interest in mind-expanding medications for psychiatric disorders.

    Norwegian scientists conducted a meta-analysis, combining the results of six randomized trials that tested the effect of a single dose of LSD for alcoholism in 536 adults. Researchers found that 59% of participants who took acid either dramatically cut back their drinking or quit, compared with 38% of controls, who either took a much smaller dose of acid or used another drinking-prevention treatment. Only eight cases of adverse effects or “bad trips” were reported, none of them lasting longer than the high itself.

    Earlier conclusions from the literature suggested that LSD was not effective for alcoholism, but those results appear related to the fact that individual studies on the subject did not include enough participants to demonstrate significant differences between the groups.

    “LSD had a significant beneficial effect on alcohol misuse at the first follow-up assessment,” write the authors of the new paper, published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology. “The effectiveness of a single dose of LSD compares well with the effectiveness of daily naltrexone [reVia, Vivitrol] acamprosate [Campral], or disulfiram [Antabuse].” Those are the drugs currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat alcoholism.

    The study found that the differences between LSD and control groups were statistically significant from two months to six months after treatment, but one year later, there was no longer a measurable improvement in those who had taken LSD. But given the persistence of alcoholism, it is perhaps more surprising that the effects of one dose of LSD lasted up to six months than it is that it would “wear off” a year later.

    The treatment of alcoholism using LSD is not as unconventional as it may appear to the unitiated. In fact, AA co-founder Bill Wilson was an early advocate of acid treatment for alcohol abuse; unlike some of his followers, Wilson never believed that AA was the only way to deal with alcoholism. He took LSD himself, finding that the mind-expanding substance facilitated a similar spiritual state to the one that had helped him stop drinking in the first place. In his official AA biography, Pass It On, he’s quoted as saying:

    It is a generally acknowledged fact in spiritual development that ego reduction makes the influx of God’s grace possible. … I consider LSD to be of some value to some people, and practically no damage to anyone. It will never take the place of any of the existing means by which we can reduce the ego, and keep it reduced.

    Similarly, the rationale for the treatment regimen used in some of the early LSD trials was that the powerful drug would “break down” alcoholics’ egos and thereby create a spiritual awakening. This was not supposed to be a fun or mellow trip.

    For example, in one of the trials included in the current analysis, the patients were actually strapped to their beds within a therapeutic community, a setting that typically involves extensive confrontation and humiliation aimed at revising their personalities. Research now shows, rather unsurprisingly, that trying to annihilate people emotionally is dangerous and can lead to long-term damage, even when it’s done without a powerful hallucinogen. Previous studies on LSD suggest that researchers may have underestimated the drug’s potential by using it as part of a counterproductive therapeutic strategy.

    Studies show that the psychedelic experience is very sensitive to context, which is why the CIA used the drug as an interrogation aid while hippies viewed it as vehicle for bring about worldwide peace and love.

    But LSD is not the only psychedelic drug that has shown promise in addiction treatment. An African drug, ibogaine, was also found in early trials to reduce or even eliminate withdrawal symptoms from heroin while producing an intense and often emotionally exhausting experience.

    This property was discovered in 1962 by a heroin addict, Howard Lotsof, who took ibogaine on the street and found that afterward, he no longer felt physical withdrawal symptoms or craving. He stayed off heroin, patented the use of ibogaine for treatment of multiple addictions and spent the rest of his life advocating for more research. Unfortunately, the drug remains tangled in controversy due to deaths associated with street use and the lingering taint of the 1960s that shadows all psychedelic-drug research.

    Still, with increasing data suggesting that psychedelics, including MDMA and psilocybin, may be useful in the treatment of psychiatric disorders ranging from depression to post-traumatic stress disorder, perhaps careful study will finally determine a role for these kinds of treatments in psychiatry.

    In addiction research, however, it’s important to temper enthusiasm and keep from overselling psychedelic “cures.” Lotsof once told me about what happened to some of his friends after they discovered that ibogaine had gotten him through heroin withdrawal with no struggle.

    As predicted, his fellow addicts reported the same lack of withdrawal. Like Lotsof, his friends also felt free — they no longer felt a physical need for heroin. But unlike Lotsof, his friends had no desire to quit; they continued to score heroin because they wanted to get high. It suggests that addiction is much more than withdrawal, physical dependence and craving.

    Psychedelic experience — like all other intense life events — may offer the potential for growth and change. How people respond, however, depends on far more than a drug.

    http://healthland.time.com/2012/03/0...at-alcoholism/
    Last edited by mr peabody; 11-10-2018 at 06:44.
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    Can ketamine cure alcoholism?

    A radical new therapy which uses the drug ketamine to wipe out booze-related memories could revolutionize how alcohol addiction is treated, scientists say. Researchers at University College London (UCL) are experimenting with a potential ketamine treatment to see if a single, one-off dose can treat the condition. They say there is growing evidence that ketamine, which is used as a recreational narcotic, can have a positive impact on those dealing with alcoholism.

    There is evidence that ketamine could be useful as a treatment for alcoholism, head researcher Ravi Das told the Guardian. The drug could suppress memory triggers - clinking glasses, the sight of beer, arriving home after work, which create the urge to drink alcohol, he said. Memories that you form can be hijacked by drugs in some people. If you were an alcoholic you might have a strong memory of being in a certain place and wanting to drink. Those memories get continuously triggered by things in the environment that you cant avoid, Das said. The main problem is the really high relapse rate after treatment.

    People can successfully quit using over the short term while theyre being monitored in the hospital, but when they return home, theyre exposed to those environmental triggers again,
    he explained.

    https://www.rt.com/uk/375010-radical...py-alcoholism/

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    How safe is ibogaine?

    Ibogaine increases electricity in the heart, which is one of the reasons why reputable clinics do cardiac screenings – to assess how the heart conducts electricity. Ibogaine has some features that require vigilance, and most experts conclude that thorough pre-screening and medical monitoring during the experience is crucial to its safety as a treatment for alcohol detoxification.

    Ibogaine also induces bradycardia (lowers heart rate, normally by about 10 beats per minute during a typical dose of 12–20mg/kg). The risk of bradycardia is that the heart rate can go very low. If the heart rate stays too low for too long, this can require immediate administration of atropine. This is a serious life-threatening situation that requires medical intervention.

    QT prolongation is another major risk with ibogaine. The QT interval is a measure of the heart’s electrical cycle - the time it takes for the ventricle to get ready from one contraction to the next. During this period, the heart is vulnerable to cardiac arrhythmias. Alcohol withdrawal also results in QT prolongation, so combining ibogaine with alcohol detox can be extremely dangerous.

    https://www.psymposia.com/magazine/h...00-treatments/

    -----

    After suffering for years from alcohol addiction, I forced myself to seek ibogaine treatment. Ibogaine's healing properties are unbelievable. I was stunned at how great I felt after the treatment. Cravings and withdrawal were virtually non-existent.

    -Joshua V.
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    How ibogaine helped me conquer alcoholism


    I drank heavily and smoked since I was 18 or 20, taking drugs of all kinds along the way but really seemed to get into the habit of drinking alcohol the most. I live in Milwaukee and went to college here and its socially acceptable to get bombed on the regular and continue with your life. Drinking really is a destination here. So as any of the other drugs I've done fell away due to boredom or lack of skill using them, I just gravitated to the spirits, bad ones, for me anyway. I come from a long line of alcoholics, actually.

    I chose a new center that was intrinsically tied to a shaman that came from Africa and has been using Iboga in the Bwiti tradition for a long time. The people that started this place have been training with him for the past number of years to be able to administer and provide an experience that is as comfortable as can be when facing things that aren’t too easy to face. These folks are people with their own stories of abuse and healing. Their own paths to be working with this medicine. And they conduct the ceremonies in a traditional Bwiti way that I didn’t hear about from any of the other centers.

    The experience with Iboga is broken into 2 journeys at this center. One is a detox and the other they call a psycho-spiritual journey. The detox varies for everyone and it can last up to 10 days if one is coming off of a heavy heroin diet, or it could be an hour if one is considerably clean. I think..:-) Now the detox doesn’t just mean a physical detox as Iboga cleans out everything not worth having in you. That being thoughts about oneself that are detrimental, experiences that are harrowing from any age that have stuck to your psyche, bad food, prescription drugs, mental processes etc. It cleans it all out.

    As the first journey was the detox Ill start there. We started around the fire and the few providers shared their experiences with how they came to Iboga and came to be working with it. The fire ceremony is important to bring the fire spirits to the area and keep it lit for the duration of the journey. We had a spoonful of raw Iboga root bark that had been ground up all dry and bitter tasting, then chased it with water. That was about 830pm… The time is integral in translating the story just to consider the length of the experience. Then the patriarch of the place spoke of the Bwiti tradition and some of their ways of thinking. Built of tradition and not religion, a way showing, seeing, and experiencing instead of something based on faith. It is something to experience, wholly visceral and tangible. After awhile we were given another bit of Iboga in red pill form that was extract. Then we had more talk of Bwiti tradition.

    About what I think was two hours had passed and at this point I was feeling the medicine and decided it was time to go into the temple. The temple is a room made up of 5 single beds spaced about a foot apart and was lit by a few candles around an alter of power objects from Africa. A room in a house actually that is turned into a sacred space safe for traveling. After a quick trip to the bathroom I laid down with my head toward the alter and my feet pointed outside. I was feeling like I had a lead blanket over me like the ones you wear while getting an X-ray and my body was vibrating heavily and tingling with electricity. I can’t remember what my mind was doing… I think I was just noticing how my body felt. A few minutes later one of the providers came over and asked how I was and told me he was going to put some pygmy dust on my 3rd eye with his finger and then he was going to tap on my forehead until I could see his finger. I told him I could perceive his finger but not see it. He told me it was ok and not to worry about it. I then got a blindfold to lay over my eyes because even the candle light was distracting with my eyes closed. As I lay there I started noticing my thoughts and how rapid they were, just blasting to and fro, fast, a bunch of images were moving in front of me but i couldn't seem to grasp them. I’d think “Oh, that's important, remember that” and as I thought it they would morph into something else and be gone with no memory of what it was. That happened numerous times.

    I started feeling like my necklace was constricting me and I needed to take it off, I never take it off and I felt like it just needed it to be off. So I sat up and kept my eyes closed as to not be distracted and undid the clasp and slid it over my head. As I brought it to the front of my face I could see my hands. My hands right in front of me with my eyes closed… and I rotated them back and forth from the palm to the back, to the palm to the back. Just noticing that I could see without opening my eyes. Then I saw my legs, the bed, looking up I saw the pane glass door that was open to the night air, then to my right a fellow journeyman and his bed and bucket. Never had I seen so clear with my 3rd eye. I put my necklace on the floor next to me with a slight cling and laid back down completely astonished.

    Now my mind was racing and the images kept coming and morphing and disappearing. I’d shift my position on the mattress and think that I was disturbing the other folks around me, or how I was being perceived laying there. The guy next to me was purging. That was distracting to the point of being pulled out of the trance and I realized I had to pee, so I sat up and motioned for the bathroom. There were 3 providers in the temple that would help with guidance, walking to the bathroom, changing buckets, anything you might need help with in that state of mind. I had to pee so much and I peed almost every time he threw up. The vomiting was almost comforting though. It just felt like… get it out man, get it all out. Then I’d go pee again, probably once an hour during the entire experience. I think it was cleansing my bladder, liver and kidneys from years of boozing. So I’d lay back down and shift and think about how I was disturbing someone, NO ONE was paying attention to my posture or movements to the point of judgement. But I thought they were. That's when I thought… why was I thinking of the way someone else was perceiving me in this state. Everyone was going through their own journey. I did that for a number of hours. Thinking how well I was doing not purging, I was handling the medicine. What a good tripper and traveler I was, look at me. It was all in my mind. I’d been looking for approval and doing things my entire life based on what other people thought of me. Or what I thought other people would think of me if I did. That was a profound thought. I didn’t understand how important that realization was until the next day though it was definitely an “ah ha” moment. Then the thought of how powerful thoughts are came into my mind. How they shape everything around us and our perception of everything around us and how they shape ourselves, and then everything I thought of would materialize.

    Part of the Iboga journey is to be able to access yourself, ancestors, and the Iboga plant itself and ask for guidance in answering any questions you have about your life… or anything for that matter. I had thought of a question I’d written down about fear. I've always moved through my life with a lot of fear. Fear of what others will think of me, fear of the unknown, fear of people finding out what I was thinking about myself (which was usually detrimental), fear of failure, success, etc. But I thought of a different question right then instead. I thought “how can I be a better husband to my wife?” Why that instead of focusing on myself, I don’t know, that's just what happened. Probably because I'm not well adjusted to being able to control my own mind. Just then an image of my wife on a go cart showed up and underneath it the words “trust her” in the font of American currency wrote itself out. I thought "Wow, ok… why would I not trust her? She’s never done anything for me not to trust her." I then thought about trust and how I've not really trusted many people to the degree of REALLY trusting them. With their opinions, or actions, or whatever. A lot of judgment and stipulation in my trust for others. I then saw images of a million interactions going back to my childhood involving my attitude toward people and how I’d not really trusted. It appeared to me right at that moment I’d never completely trusted myself… and in doing so, never believed in anyone else. Let that resonate… or read it again. I looked as far back as I could trying to find a time when I had trusted myself completely, and couldn’t find a time when I had. My question had morphed into the correct words. ‘When had I started to become fearful’ was re formed into ‘when had I lost my trust.’ I understood that my fear was a by product of such.

    I also saw porn images I've watched, sitcoms from the 80’s. For real, I’d find myself in a happy days episode or Mork and Mindy, it was bizarre. Like those shows had programmed something in my young mind about how the world works. I saw old girlfriends, things I was hurt by, and all kinds of stuff that I thought was “lower” in vibration. I thought I was supposed to be having a trip into higher consciousness… I didn’t realize until later after the many hours that passed and into the next day that these were all things that were being taken out of me as a detox.

    At dawn one by one we all left the temple for our rooms to be alone and sift through the images and feelings we’d experienced during the journey. Each one of us being escorted by one of the providers that had been in the temple with us through the night. Back in my room I cried like Ive never cried before. And because I was ready to heal and just surrendered I just let it come. I probably cried and sobbed for about 2-3 hours on and off. Every time I felt like I had to cry I just cried. I let it all out. Now some of you may be used to crying and I thought I was. I cry at the beauty of a song that touches me or a movie that's done right. Or at my son and his accomplishments or failures, and maybe just how beautiful things are to him. I usually hold back though and defer it to some other time, which never comes. So I just let it go. There weren’t really any thoughts tied to it besides how I've treated myself and my family over the years. Nothing ridiculously horrible, just embarrassing or bad to me. Things I’d missed from being hungover or being drunk at inappropriate times or things I’d said. HA, so I guess it wasn’t nothing...

    The providers would come and check on us about every hour, bring us fruit and make sure we had water. Granted I wasn’t able to eat anything until 9 or 10 the next evening. The time line was pretty harrowing as I said before. Ceremony started at 7:30, medicine was ingested around 8:30, go into temple I guess around 9:30 or 10. At dawn we’d go to the rooms and sleep wouldn’t come until around midnight the next night. So that puts it at about 30 hours of introspection. They say Iboga will let you sleep when its done working on you. But I was so tired and drained from the experience that I’d just lay there awake remembering and trying to write or record my voice with some of the things that happened.

    After some sleep we had a day of rest and were taken to some hot springs for a mud bath and a swim. Some delicious organic food was served up and we met other folks from a similar Iboga center and talked with them and each other about our experience. Everyone's experience was just as different than the next. The similarities seemed to be only in the “ah ha” moments.

    Sunday was the next ceremony and it started the same way with all of us around the fire and a few people shared some things, then they asked us to share some things from our first journey. I think a lot of folks felt like it was really almost too personal. Or maybe they hadn’t processed some of the heavier stuff that they saw or felt during. I offered up the 2 major things that I didn’t think were too personal to share and vocalized about how I feel like I’d been doing things for approval for most of my life instead of doing things for myself. And not trusting myself for however long. We also had our questions written down for the guided part of the journey if we ever got there. Later in the week the doctor that lives there stated that people spend 10 years to come to conclusions like that and it happened in one night. He said he didn’t know how Iboga does it, but it does. He has seen it over and over. Besides being there for any health concerns he is studying the effects of Iboga for these reasons.

    We also did a few other things that I’ll leave out. If you choose to have the experience you can see for yourself. This time the medicine started to hit me early and I figured it was time to go into temple and lay down. As I lay down, one of the providers gave me the blindfold for my eyes. I lay there and put my hands directly across from each other over my chest. I could feel the electricity between them and sort of played with it for a bit. Its an amazing feeling to play with the energy, its like two magnets pushing against each other. I was in awe of that and could feel my body just vibrating like crazy, like I was plugged in. I've had other psychedelic experiences and it was quite similar with the onset. Granted it wasn’t a nervous feeling like the onset of acid or mushrooms can be. But having a psychedelic reference point was nice. I started to spin round n round like the alcohol spins and I opened my eyes and said stop, and the spinning stopped… then closed my eyes and it started up again. But then the spins shifted and I felt like I was spinning flat on top of a figure eight like the infinity symbol but it was just my head and feet dipping instead of a full out spin.

    The medicine started to really come on and I wasn’t sure what to expect. I was trying to have no expectations but it was really coming on and I wasn’t sure what was happening. My body just kept vibrating at a higher level minute by minute and it wasn’t topping off, the medicine was kicking. So I felt an intuition and voice inside me say “go”. Then I said to myself “I’ll let the medicine come on stronger,” then again, "Go, no I’ll wait, I should go, no I’ll wait." I was really afraid but I didn’t know of what and I wasn’t sure of where I was gonna go? I was just staring into black space. I was really fighting with myself and maybe it was just to let go… or to actually go somewhere. All I know is what happened next is one of the most poignant and helpful things I’ve ever felt when it comes to having support from friends and family. Out of my pillow from under my head my sons face showed up in all its two front toothless glory and whispered into my ear… ”Just go daddy” I’m tearing up as I write this. “Just go.” Then behind my son my wife shows up and she puts her arms around him, and she says “This is why you came down here, you should go.” And what did I say?! I’ll wait till the medicine kicks in a bit more!!!!! Gsus! There was something blocking my view off to the left like a black object… I couldn’t see past it and that was the way I wanted to go or where I was being pulled toward. I then saw two really good friends Dustin and Kristine in the sky off in space. I asked them .. "Is it clear over there?” Dustin goes, “Yeah, it's clear, you can go.” Kristine was patting her thighs and clapping encouragingly saying “Yeah, go, go” and Dustin is saying “gooooo” like he’s calling me onto a wave..this one’s yours man I can see it, go go go, like paddle man, you got this. My wife is saying Go and my boy is saying Go. In this cacophonous sound of 5 people coming to a crescendo of GO! I couldn't deny it anymore. My body was just really moving, like my spirit was about to come out of it. I raised my arm like I was in school or something and said to one of the providers… ”Hey, I need some guidance over here..." He asked what was going on and I said “I’m being told I need to go,” and he says, “Where do you need to go?” Like he was wondering hmmm, what's he wanting, does he feel he needs to leave the temple or something?… not sure. I was lucid enough to tell him .. ”Oh shit, I’m not explaining myself correctly,” and told him the scene that was happening as we were speaking with everyone telling me to go. He said “Alright, let’s do it.” I don’t remember if that's exactly what he said, but it was similar in resonance.

    He guided me to my house and told me to go inside. Remember that I said in this state anything I thought of would materialize? Literally anything that came into my mind would appear. I went inside the front door of my house and stood in my living room. He asked if anyone was there and I panned the room with my eye. In the dining room… it was me. I was standing face to face with myself.

    Many things happened during this part of the journey and Im not going to go into it here but it was extraordinary in every aspect. I dealt with so many things that have hampered me in my past. I had questions written out that the provider read to me and I would repeat them aloud getting answers immediately from myself. You can ask anything and most of my questions were very personal in nature about events and people in my life past and present. And for the first time in my life things were clear about where I’d come from, who I am, and my place in all of it.

    At one point I started breathing really heavily and the vibration of my body was extreme, just total surrender…and it was buzzing. I started breathing hard enough and I was not focusing on the questions at hand. Later a guy in the ceremony said he had sat up thinking something may have been wrong. The provider asked me what was going on. I said if I have to fly again I’m flying with my soul. He asked me what I was doing and I said I was flying with my soul into space and a very high speed, holding onto his ankle. I mean we were moving! Just sonic. He said "Well you can fly all night maybe you can ask him to come back so we can get to some of these questions answered." I had a full page written out. Kinda funny actually. We came back down to earth and sat back down on some stairs of a deck where we were talking.

    Like I said I'm not going into the main answers I received because if you want it, you can have your own experience. But I’ll tell you this, it was the most spiritual experience of my life. And I've had a few in my life but they were nothing like this. I got access to the spirit world and spent a number of hours there traveling and reconnecting with my spirit guide and soul. And I was the bumbling fella trailing behind trying to keep up with them both. I remember yelling to my soul as they walked up a hillside “Where are you going?” He said ”As long as he’s around I’m hanging with him.”

    After a brief exchange about going around with each other into the ether, we took off on a chalkboard eraser in to the spirit world to see some things I was to be shown. At this point in the journey had become extraordinarily psychedelic and it was all I could do to stay focused and ride around on the vehicle which we chose to use. I would get distracted by something the Bwiti music would be building in the trip and I would go into it and become part of it. After I don’t know how long I would think to myself… ”I was doing something…not sure what but I was focusing..” I’d hear a whistle and look up, and there would be my soul and my guide on the eraser and they’d motion for me with an arm wave saying c’mon let's go. With no judgement I’d be back in the front seat and we be trucking along looking at the nature of reincarnation, the fate of the earth, my birth, and questions I hadn’t even thought of. Every time I’d get lost in the trip I’d do the same thing. My guide and I worked out a meeting place after a few times of just coming to and having them whistle. I would picture a kid's slide, one of those spiral slides at a playground. It was blue with a yellow top. I’d come to, out of some psychedelic mechanism remembering I was doing something and in an instant, I’d run up that slide under the hood of yellow and hop into the eraser and we’d set off again into the ether. A generalized meeting place that would appear just as I thought of it.

    I do apologize I can’t divulge all of this part of the journey because I know I would want to hear it from someone after all the stuff from the detox. But it was such a beautiful experience reuniting with myself and my guide that its just that close to my heart that I don’t want to put it all out there. We all have these things in us that are just for us.

    It is very soothing to have some clarity on the things that have tripped me up for so long. Some perspective that I had not know previously. It's like all of the things I learned were already things I knew but couldn’t access until I let go fully and surrendered. I can’t emphasize enough the amount of surrender it took to just let all this information come. I know some folks fight this stuff and that's gotta be harder than just letting it happen. I was ready to heal and let whatever information come through that was going to, the good, the bad and the ugly, accept and let it go. It wasn’t pleasant seeing and reliving certain things from my past, but it was awe inspiring.

    I could’ve written a novel considering the amount of things I experienced during the journeys and during the 8 days I was there. Granted if I had better grammatical knowledge I probably would. And this was just a small portion of all the pageantry and fireworks that an Iboga experience can bring. As I sit here on my porch with the mid-western summer rain coming down in buckets and my son sound asleep in bed I feel extremely grateful. Grateful for the man I once was that pushed to seek answers and healing. And the man I am now, continuing to work on myself in so many ways. I was, as Mike Ness’s album title describes, ‘cheating at solitaire’ and it was wholly unfair to myself. It seems to me that the medicine called to me. Or I was drawn to it. Whichever the case, Iboga is what provided the catalyst to change for me. It helped me get out of a pattern of bad thoughts, horrible actions, and negative vibrations mostly focused toward myself. It's not a magic pill, it doesn’t do the work for you. It seems to open a doorway to walk through. But the work has to be done continually, it just seems clearer now as to what I have to do for myself to sustain a healthy and happy life.

    The lessons have stayed with me for the most part though the novelty of the experience has faded. I'm watching my thoughts more clearly, I am grateful every morning for the day prior, and the day to come, and I conquered my alcoholism and the hounding of that demon.
    I stand taller, breath deeper, and feel calmer.
    I am grateful.

    http://reset.me/personal-story/perso...ling-ibogaine/
    Last edited by mr peabody; 19-10-2018 at 10:05.
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