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Thread: Japanese finally execute doomsday cult responsible for 1995 Tokyo subway atttacks

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    Japanese finally execute doomsday cult responsible for 1995 Tokyo subway atttacks 
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    The leader of a cult in Japan whose followers released deadly gas in the Tokyo subway in 1995, killing 13 people and injuring thousands, was executed Friday.
    The cult leader, Shoko Asahara, was one of 13 people sentenced to death in connection with the attack and other killings carried out by the group, Aum Shinrikyo. He was hanged Friday morning along with six followers, Japan?s Justice Ministry said.
    Japan, which generally reserves capital punishment for people convicted of multiple homicides, usually executes a handful of people each year. The date of executions is not announced in advance, and the condemned are usually only told a few hours beforehand.
    But the executions of Mr. Asahara and his followers had been expected since January, when Japan?s Supreme Court rejected an appeal by the last member of Aum Shinrikyo to stand trial.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/05/w...av=bottom-well
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    23 years of work for a dozen lawyers...

    I am often guilty of experiencing a sense of gladness when the story ends with "before turning the gun on themselves".

    Should we, as humans, keep people alive and imprisioned for such extreme time periods if we are killing them or at best never letting them out?

    Would you rather be put down or left in prison for over 20 years first?

    Philosophically, if we keep a human alive out of the slim chance they are repairable, how long should we wait before the cost to humanity as a whole is higher for keeping them incarcerated then they can ever repay? How much of your effort should be spent on broken humans?
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    I'd certainly rather be killed outright than sit in jail for 20 years and then killed. Maybe that's the point though, if you just kill someone they really aren't suffering for long. Then again, the point should really be to protect the rest of society, and spending tons of money on prisoners isn't beneficial.
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    It's really part of the debate, to me, if prison is rehabilitative or punitive. Or for some nuance, it's a question of how to implement a balance for each individual and the system itself.

    I wouldn't want to go to prison in Japan for a long stretch of time.

    Japan's prisons: Silent screams


    Why you might prefer a Bangkok jail to one in Chiba
    LIKE the rest of Japan, its prisons are strikingly clean, safe and orderly?and as quiet as retirement homes. Yet reformers who have surveyed some of the world?s penal hellholes say that Japan?s jails rank among the cruellest?for the psychological toll they take on inmates.

    Past inmates describe draconian rules. Eye contact with prison wardens is often forbidden or, when allowed, has to be accompanied by a smiling demeanour. Some compulsory prison work can be mind-numbing?folding pieces of paper into eight and unfolding them, for instance. Talk is banned for much of the day.

    Reading is only sometimes allowed.


    Toshio Oriyama is a former restaurant owner who spent 22 years behind bars for a murder he insists he did not commit. ?You weren?t free to do anything except breathe the air,? he says; even to stand up required a guard?s permission. Mr Oriyama had to sit cross-legged much of the time, in some pain; and ?when we took a bath, the bums of all my inmates were dark like bedsores? from sitting in the same position all the time. A common punishment for misdemeanours was solitary confinement, where Mr Oriyama had to sit facing the door all day long. Two people with whom he shared a cell separately hanged themselves after losing their status as well-behaved prisoners, he says.


    Death-row inmates have it worst. They wait in solitary confinement, sometimes for many years. They are not told when they will be executed; prisoners wake each day not knowing if it is their last. Sakae Menda, who was exonerated of murder and released in 1983, once described how when the guards stopped each morning at his door ?your heart would pound?.


    Ordinary Japanese are often either unaware or untroubled by their penal system?s cruelty. The media generally regard judges? verdicts as ?the voice of heaven?, says Ichiro Hara, chief producer of ?The Scoop Special?, a news show from TV Asahi that, unusually, draws attention to wrongful convictions. Japanese tend to put themselves in the shoes of crime victims, not of suspects, says Kana Sasakura, a law professor attempting to overturn wrongful convictions. Broad-based civic pressure for reform does not yet exist.

    A broad overhaul of criminal justice, and even the scrapping of the death penalty, seemed possible when the Democratic Party of Japan won power in 2009. But since the conservative Liberal Democratic Party came back to office in late 2012, executions have gathered pace, while the government stands firmly behind prosecutors and the police. It is even trying to toughen the regime for juvenile offenders, despite a fall in crime.


    Change may start with judges. The judge who freed Iwao Hakamada (see article) went so far as to accuse the authorities of fabricating evidence, albeit long ago. Campaigners hope he may overturn other wrongful verdicts. Another judge who later criticised interrogation techniques was one of the three who passed down the death sentence on Mr Hakamada. But too many others, say campaigners, only discover their consciences as they near retirement, with no chances of further promotion.
    More in-depth: Brutal realities about prison in Japan
    Last edited by cduggles; 07-07-2018 at 16:48. Reason: Formatting
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    Here's pretty grisly photos of where the deed is done:

    https://nypost.com/2018/07/06/japans...t-any-warning/
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    If we're straying off topic, I can't help but notice that if this kind of thing happened today we'd have people insisting it was a government conspiracy and that they were brainwashed into doing it and couldn't possibly have obtained sarin or other chemical weapons except by the states help etc etc.

    Of course all those same crazies were around in 95, but the Internet has since connected them all together and normalized it.

    Just something I couldn't help notice. It's becoming hard to believe there was ever a time when anything bad ever happened that wasn't widely claimed to be a giant international conspiracy.
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    Any number of topics can come up organically from this thread!

    If you have any doubts about the suitability of what you want to post, please pm CE&P staff.
    Last edited by cduggles; 08-07-2018 at 01:04. Reason: To X-factor
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    I could be wrong here, and if I am I hope someone will let me know. But its long been my understanding that for the longest time this cult was responsible for one of only 2 deaths ever resulting from VX. That number would have increased recently of course. Something I always found interesting. That VX is the most lethal nerve agent on earth, that we've stockpiled barrels and barrels of the stuff. But so very few people have ever died of it.

    Of course they never wound up using VX in their attacks against the public, it was used against one of their own when they betrayed them. One reason being that VX has such low volatility that it couldn't be effectively used the way they wanted.

    Not sure why I'm mentioning this, I just thought it was interesting.
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    Crimes are celebrated in our society despite wanting to not say it aloud. We may take the convicts life after a bunch of years or we may incarcerate them at our expense for extreme periods of time but they never pay for any of it. The whole concept of retribution for crime is pretty impossible to inflict on someone without work camps.

    In truth we have a very archaic justice system and I don't ever see justice come out of it. We spend money playing with inmates lives like cats with mice. If you really want a death sentence crime is a slow way to go, it takes years, the fast track is just run out of money and you can quietly die with no interest from anyone.

    As a society we need to rethink how we glorify crime. We talk hard about it from one side of our mouths but we make movies that show the great minds of criminals and run court cases for years so we can all learn the intricate details of their thinking process.

    The only value I see in our current system is the media get a lot of stories from it so we get to see just how poorly our rehabilitation systems work.

    Just my opinion but if we need to kill someone for a crime I think right away should be the moment, if we are wrong could it truly be any worse then letting the 10 people that died of starvation while you read this post die?

    We make poor choices bases on what our ancestors did and how they did it. Punishment is a human failure as it does not instill a value, how does fear and suffering teach you much beyond hatred and revenge? And I'm way off topic but incarceration is rampant like a disease and our police forces are randomly shooting civilians, justice isn't a word we will ever find with force.
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    Yes, with sarin. The event I referred to involving VX happened earlier than that.
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    Yeah that's the one I'm thinking of. I'd forgotten it was the first human death. But that's what I mean. I find it such a strange situation that we've produced such enormous quantities of the stuff just to sit around and be intimidating. That being largely it's only function.
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    Japan on Thursday executed all six former members of the Aum Shinrikyo doomsday cult who remained on death row after the execution of the group’s founder and six other members earlier this month, Japan’s Justice Ministry said.
    The six — Satoru Hashimoto, Toru Toyoda, Kenichi Hirose, Yasuo Hayashi, Masato Yokoyama and Kazuaki Okazaki — were convicted of involvement in one or more of three crimes: the 1995 sarin nerve gas attack on the Tokyo subway system, another sarin attack in Nagano Prefecture, in 1994, and the murders of a lawyer, his wife and their baby son in 1989.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/26/w...e=sectionfront

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    #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Xorkoth View Post
    I'd certainly rather be killed outright than sit in jail for 20 years and then killed. Maybe that's the point though, if you just kill someone they really aren't suffering for long. Then again, the point should really be to protect the rest of society, and spending tons of money on prisoners isn't beneficial.
    This is actually a strategy that is employed and reserved for the worst of the worst in Japan. They'll tell you your date is coming up, go through all the prep work, take you to be executed then right before going through with it you'll be removed from the chamber and put back in your cell. I'm sure they did it multiple times to him before finally doing it for real.

    There are rumors that members of the cult got out of the country to continue the work of their leader. Really scary stuff considering the cult was attempting to get ahold of nuclear weapons at some point. If anyone is interested here is a portion of their recruitment video. Always found it creepy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lf_6GKvyg58
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    ^ Maybe it's because I understand Japanese but I could only make it through about a minute of that video. It's beyond creepy. Especially that cartoon, Jesus-looking Asahara.

    And actually no, inmates don't get any "notice" that their date has come up until it actually comes up. They have maybe a few hours notice if that.
    Last edited by aihfl; 26-07-2018 at 21:00.
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    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by aihfl View Post
    And actually no, inmates don't get any "notice" that their date has come up until it actually comes up. They have maybe a few hours notice if that.
    That's what I mean, they get told this multiple times over the course of a sentence. It isn't talked about much but the guards are known for leading them to be executed only to tell them the day hasn't come yet and putting them back in the cell.
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    Lawyer Tomoki Ikenaga had long felt that a former schoolmate at Waseda University’s law faculty on death row wanted to get something off his chest but could not find the right words.
    Ikenaga had frequently visited the Tokyo Detention House, hoping that Satoru Hashimoto would finally explain why he and other highly educated individuals became so infatuated with Aum Shinrikyo founder Chizuo Matsumoto that they would murder innocent people on his instructions.
    The lawyer never received an answer.
    Hashimoto and the five other Aum Shinrikyo members were executed on July 26.
    All 13 cultists who were sentenced to death have now been hanged. But their executions still leave questions open about what led the young members to commit the crimes, including mass murder, more than two decades ago. And the executions have not brought closure to some family members of the victims.

    http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201807270024.html

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    Justice Ministry officials pressed their reluctant boss to swiftly order the executions of Aum Shinrikyo cultists to prevent their cases from casting a shadow over the crowning of a new emperor and the Tokyo Olympics, sources said.
    The ministry also decided to split the cultists on death row into two groups to gauge international reaction to the first round of executions, the ministry sources said.
    Thirteen members of the doomsday cult were sentenced to death for a series of crimes that killed 27 people and sickened thousands, including sarin nerve gas attacks in Nagano Prefecture in 1994 and the Tokyo subway system in 1995.
    The conclusion of the final Aum-related trial in January this year opened the way for the executions.

    http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201807270051.html

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