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    Treating alcohol addiction with psychedelics 
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    Bluelighter mr peabody's Avatar
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    Welcome!

    Following is a digest of articles and reports that is constantly updated. Jump in!

    These
    medicines don't work for everyone, but for many struggling with alcohol addiction they can be truly life-changing.


    -----

    This thread discusses self-treatment of alcoholism with psychedelics, especially LSD and psilocybin, substances that are currently illegal in many countries.
    There are, however, substances readily available which are closely equivalent.

    1. The substance most closely equivalent to LSD is ALD-52* (legal in most countries and easy to buy online).

    Exceptions:

    - United Kingdom: As of January 7th, 2015, ALD-52 is specifically named in the U.K. Misuse of Drugs Act as a Class A drug.
    - Latvia: ALD-52 is illegal in Latvia. Although it isn't officially scheduled, it is controlled as an LSD structural analog due to an amendment made on June 1, 2015.

    More information on this substance can be found here: https://psychonautwiki.org/wiki/ALD-52

    Dose:

    Micro 6 - 10ug
    Light 25 - 75ug
    Common 75 - 150ug
    Strong over 150ug

    *It has been postulated that ALD-52 can act as a potential trigger for those with underlying psychiatric conditions, so those with either a personal or family history
    of mental illness are generally advised not to use this substance.


    2. The substance most closely equivalent to psilocybin is 4-AcO-DMT (legal in most countries and easy to buy online).

    More information on this substance can be found here: https://psychonautwiki.org/wiki/4-AcO-DMT

    Exceptions:

    - Belgium: The import of 4-AcO-DMT is illegal.
    - Brazil: Possession, production and sale is illegal as it is listed on Portaria SVS/MS nÂș 344.
    - United States: 4-AcO-DMT is currently unscheduled in the United States, however, sale for human consumption, or use for non-medical or research purposes "could" be
    prosecuted as crimes under the Federal Analogue Act.
    - United Kingdom: 4-AcO-DMT is a Class A drug in the UK as it is an ester of the Class A drug psilocin.
    - Italy: This drug is illegal as it is an ester of an illegal substance.
    - Sweden: 4-AcO-DMT was made illegal in Sweden on 25 January 2017

    Dose:

    Micro 1 - 2 mg
    Light 3 - 7 mg
    Common 8 - 20 mg
    Strong 25+ mg

    CAUTIONARY GUIDELINES

    Certain people are much, much more sensitive to psychedelics than others, meaning their threshold dose is a small fraction of what others seem to be comfortable taking, so in general,
    never mind what people say.

    If you are prone to anxiety, steer clear of psilocybin, and never smoke weed before/during your trip. Start off with 1/3 tab (40ug) of LSD or ALD-52, and do that amount several times to establish your equilibrium. If all goes well, advance to 1/2 tab (60ug) and hold it there awhile. Advance no more than 1/4 tab (30ug) after that, and in general, dose only once in a session.
    I would avoid mixing any other drugs with psychedelics while you are finding your feet (say, for the first year). The best policy is always START SMALL AND INCH FORWARD.


    People diagnosed with a psychotic disorder, or people with biological parents or siblings diagnosed with a psychotic disorder should not take psychedelics, including LSD, psilocybin, DMT and LSA. Psychotic disorders include schizophrenia, delusional disorder, affective (mood-related) psychosis and others. Psychedelics may exacerbate symptoms of psychosis or trigger psychosis
    in people who were psychotic in the past, or with immediate family members who were or are psychotic.


    Taking psychedelics during or immediately after a period of emotional upheaval, such as a relationship breakup or the death of a loved one, may intensify negative emotions, even to a point that feels out of control.?

    Psychedelics should only be taken when one feels confident and secure in his or her ability to handle a psychedelic experience and is confident in the stability of ones mind set.

    Psychedelics should only be taken in a place where one feels secure and with people they can trust.

    Psychedelics and some of the chemicals found in natural substances containing psychedelics can cause miscarriage. Do not take psychedelics if you are pregnant or think you might be pregnant.

    Use of some psychedelics is known to increase heart rate and blood pressure, so consult with your doctor if you suffer any conditions that would be negatively affected by this.

    Reynauds syndrome (cold-triggered reduction or loss of circulation in fingers and toes) will be made worse by taking a vasoconstrictor, and psychedelics are vasoconstrictors.

    People taking lithium should not use psychedelics. Anecdotal reports suggest lithium can greatly increase the psychoactive effects of psychedelics and that it can produce very unpleasant feelings, or even symptoms similar to epileptic seizures.

    Tricyclic antidepressants, such as Trofanil (imipramine), Anafranil (clomipramine) and others, and MAOIs taken along with psychedelics, may greatly intensify the psychoactive effects.

    People with serious liver problems should avoid psilocybin mushrooms as some might have compounds that could affect the liver.



    Protect your anonymity!


    1. Use a paid VPN (Mullvad is a good one)
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    3. Request delivery in a plain, unmarked package free of sender's details
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    The importance of using Regeant Test Kits


    Use a good scale! This Gemini-20 milligram scale below is a good one*, and costs just $24 on Amazon.



    *Accurate down to about 3mg. Put the weighing tray on after turning on the scale, factor the tray's weight into the amount you're weighing and triple weigh it just to be sure.




    Asian Dub Foundation Rebel Warrior


    How LSD cured my alcoholism


    The only thing holding me back all these years was the classic text book answer, DENIAL. I spent years ridiculing AA, and basically the system in general. Sure I played it a couple times, but I was never there on my own. Lies were the foundation of my addiction. You know the old saying you can't love anyone until you love yourself, well I believe the same holds true for lying. I lied to myself for years and didnt know it, just because of that famous word DENIAL. I knew I was different or rather thought, I had all the answers.

    I drank because I loved to get fucked up, without even knowing I was lying to myself, and I truly never found the root cause to my addiction. For years it was band aid fixes and destruction compounding over the years. I was unwilling pretty much is what it was. I wanted to go outside the norm and prove I wasn't an alcoholic, when deep down inside I knew I had a problem, and little lies to myself started it all. I would wake up shaking, feeling sick, and usually in secret I would have morning drinks, to knock off the edge. This pattern would set the foundation up until the final days of my drinking career.

    I could ramble on and list all the cliche things I did, hiding drinks, taking extra shots in the morning, and the funny thing is for years I was convinced it was because I wanted to keep the party going, never once sitting back and looking at the big picture to see the underlying cause of my drinking, I was blinded by Denial, and I did your typical alcoholic things - I lied, I stole, I hurt my spouse, and I always promised to change. I'm not saying I didn't mean it, I truly did. But I didn't know the cause of my addiction.

    I disappointed many people including friends and family, and I was forgiven most of the time. I lost jobs for not showing up, and calling in sick.? I look back after all this, and this was life's way of foreshadowing my realization this time around. The question was did my subconscious know I was ?sick?? Because I had no options on those famous sick days - be sick, or keep drinking and go in drunk. And that same concept held true for every event I was sick? for. The answer was so close, yet so far away. I was blinded by addiction, a term I now believe exists. And the word denial means something a whole lot more now. I understand, and I am willing.

    So fast forward. I lost it all... I wasn't there for my kids..., I pretty much lost my job..., and the booze was part of it..., I had hit what addicts call rock bottom.? I had tried rehab and AA, and nothing worked for me.

    In desperation and pretty much in secret I started looking up how psychedelic therapy worked in the past when LSD was readily available, I had heard [the] rumor that it was
    a cure, so to speak. It got rid of the compulsion. I heard psychiatrists used to give the alcoholic? a high dose of LSD and during the peak when ego death occurred the family would come in and basically attack the patient and really let them know in a no holds barred environment how much alcohol was messing up the family. And after the supervised trip some counseling would be done, and the alcoholic appeared to be cured, never wanting to drink again.

    So I made a decision I was going to use LSD as a last ditch effort. I had to keep this all down low and not because LSD is illegal, procuring it is easy and was the least of my concerns. It was everything else, the logistics behind such a plan. The amounts of LSD they were giving back in the day was not what I wanted to do myself, especially alone,? so I picked up one hit at 150ug. I now needed a family, knowing mine wouldn't approve or want to [hear what] was on my mind. So in late spring after I saw my children I proceeded with trying to cut back [my] drinking. But when I did, I used my phone to document myself, not hours but moments here and there. And if I wasn't capable, I had a friend who would do it for me.

    So after several weeks and not watching these videos, I was sure I had horrible footage, disgusting footage. Words can't express what I knew those recordings would have. I saved texts, pretty much anything that could be told to me by family members, so after a couple weeks I had that part done. Now I was ready. I sat on these things for a few more weeks and then one day I knew it was time, I am not sure what it was but I just knew, I had blown through most of my paycheck, I lost personal items, and I was in bad shape. I knew at the end of that month I was ready. So on that evening I locked myself in my room and proceeded to take the LSD with all lights off, and recording I sat in the dark, with them on a loop and listened; I didn't know the person I came to know quite well.

    The LSD opened up a part of my brain that let me look from outside in and make an assessment as to how to change things. The trip last just over 5 hours at its peak and I rode it out for about 8. I watched, listened and looked for answers. And I am not sure what triggered it but I saw something in that drunken asshole. I didn't see someone who wanted to get fucked up,? I saw a sick man, I saw someone who was sick without a drink, I looked sick. I could feel it just listening [to] the recordings. And the family has spoken and I listened, I started to think of other events in my life which led to this conclusion. I had an answer I was/am sick. And now that I knew the root cause I could proceed to fix it.

    I came to realize that I was using alcohol to medicate, and not emotionally, but physically. Somewhere along the way I had become physically addicted, where my body needed alcohol to feel normal. The when doesn't matter. What matters is I found an answer, I found out I was getting sick without it. The foreshadowing was right. I looked at everything, I would drink to feel normal, and side effects were getting drunk, and as I needed more and more I drank and drank. The intoxication wasn't what I was going for, it was feeling normal. But there is no balance, either you're normal or drunk. I also realized I hated drinking. I wanted to stop, I had the will. But I needed it.

    In an instant I had an answer and I knew it to be the one I was seeking, it made sense. Everything fell into place. So that year, I did my own solo LSD intervention, I wouldn't recommend it for all, but under the right circumstances there's a magic there. I was lucky it went the way it did. With no formal training I did psychedelic therapy on myself, and for the moment it seemed to work. I talked myself out of [the] trip and played all the roles in this therapy. The story doesn't end there. I was still sick, I still wanted to drink. It didn't cure me, it gave me the key to the end of alcohol. I had a few days I figured would be the worst of it, so I stayed home, I locked myself in room and detoxed, and never let the memory of that trip fade away.

    As the sickness went away and the compulsion left, the memory of that night never faded, and hasn't; I am constantly reminded why I did what I did. Crazy thing is it's working, I have no love affair with booze, I don't miss waking up confused, sometimes literally dumb, or wondering what I did, or checking my texts. All those side effects to alcohol aren't with me anymore. I do have another outlook on my addiction and how powerful addiction really can be. I don't believe that if a person is addicted to one they must be addicted to all. I realize alcohol is my poison, and I believe it was that first time I got physically addicted and I've been fighting it since, never knowing. Which led to all the failed attempts.

    I still use some intoxicants, mainly pot. Call it the lesser of two evils. My point is that alcohol is no longer there, and small changes are happening. I am writing this because I feel the need to document what could be the moment that saved and gave me my life back. I am grateful each day for not drinking. And I owe it to myself to keep up with it, but it was LSD that gave me the answer, and for that I will forever be grateful. It worked for me in the past and it sure as hell seems to be working now. The point is I am sober and happy and I have no intention of getting SICK again and letting DENIAL get the best of me.

    I will never forget the answer. It is my answer, and one day I'm sure others will share my gratitude. REMEMBER THE VALUE OF HAVING AN OPEN MIND AND BELIEVING IN POSSIBILITY. After all, it is only human.

    Warmest thanks to somahaoma for this post.
    Last edited by mr peabody; 03-09-2018 at 12:08.
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    Cream Those Were The Days


    How alcohol ruined my life and ibogaine changed it


    Alcohol ruined my life. Period. It’s like looking back, I know why I drank, knew of course, at least toward the end that I had a problem. My entire waking existence was governed by alcohol. If I wasn’t drunk, then I couldn’t do it. It was simple. In my mind, I lived better when I was drinking. I was a better friend, better mom, better daughter. I worked better when I was drunk, I mean who really wants a sober, quiet bartender, right? Was I an alcoholic before I started working at the bar? Probably not, but I definitely drank. Being a bartender just made it easier. Do I blame my former profession as a bartender for my road to alcoholism? Definitely not. I know plenty of people in the industry who are not raging alcoholics. I, it turned out, was just not one of them.

    Ironically, it was while working at the bar I first heard of ibogaine. I was loaded, or course, but loaded was like my sober. Without alcohol I was sick. I couldnt function (I thought) without it. I was, by this time, drinking every morning, shaking and incoherent until I had those first few shots. For some reason, I listened to what this guy across the bar from me was telling me. It wasn’t him that had taken ibogaine, but one of his buddies that, according to him, had succumb to a pretty raw heroin addiction. I listened, hearing him talk about his friend’s addiction as if he were talking about me. All he needed to do was switch the person and the addiction, and me and this guy could have been the same person. I couldn’t get this conversation out of my mind for weeks so I decided to do my own research on ibogaine. I sat at the computer for hours that day, seriously feeling that the whole conversation with this guy was part of something so much bigger. The things I read spoke more clearly to me than anything else I’d ever known about addiction treatment before. You couldn’t get me near an AA meeting, and I had no idea there were really other options out there. I also, had no real desire to quit drinking before I read about ibogaine. I know I had ruined relationships, my girlfriend had left me months before, and my old friends wouldn’t really have anything to do with me, but none of that really seemed to matter to me. It was like, that was my fate, and I could really have cared less.

    Ibogaine changed all of this. All my research led to this incredible need within to see what this was all about. I can’t explain it more than some crazy act of divine intervention, and it seemed like from the moment I learned about what it was, I knew I had to know more. That need did not go away and not even two weeks after I learned more about what it was, I was on a plane to San Diego to head to Mexico and Ibogaine University. This, it turns out, has been one of the best decisions I have ever made.

    From the time I arrived until the time I left, I knew I was supposed to be there no matter how surreal the whole experience was. I was sick. I am now well. I was scared. I have lost my fear. Now I see it changed everything, only when I first got to the clinic, I didnt know why I was really there, only that I felt I needed to. Did I think I needed treatment? I must have, even if it wasn’t on a conscious level. I don’t remember thinking oh I am an alcoholic that needs to get treatment. Not at all. It was more like, I need to see what this is about. I need to know if this is real. There has been nothing more real in my life. Although I choose not to share what my visual experience was like (it is something I feel is sacred and meant only for me), I will say that what I saw during treatment, was everything connected and there was no other place I was supposed to be than in that clinic under the influence of this powerful African root. When it was over I knew I would never drink again. I also knew that I wasn’t losing anything and was gaining everything.

    -anon
    Last edited by mr peabody; 25-06-2018 at 18:23.
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    Sgt. Pepper


    B
    eneficial effect of LSD on alcoholism

    By Nick Collins

    In the 60s and 70s several clinics ran trials to determine whether lysergic acid diethylamide, or LSD, could help alcoholics overcome their dependence with varying degrees of success. The supervisors of one trial noted: It was rather common for patients to claim significant insights into their problems, and to feel that they had been given a new lease on life, and to make a strong resolution to discontinue their drinking.

    None of the experiments featured enough patients to draw any firm conclusions, but now a reanalysis of all the data taken together, totaling 536 patients, suggests the treatment could have potential after all. The new study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology found that LSD had a positive effect on alcohol misuse in each of the trials, with 59 per cent of patients who took the drug having improved at follow-up, compared with 38 per cent who took a placebo. A single dose of LSD produces benefits which last between six and 12 months, and repeated doses along with modern treatments could ensure longer term results, the researchers said.

    The drug, which causes hallucinations that make users experience the world in a distorted way, is not physically addictive but some experts believe users can become dependent on its effects, for example from a need to distance themselves from reality.

    Johansen, Norwegian researcher and fellow of Harvard Medical School, who led the research, said: Given the evidence for a beneficial effect of LSD on alcoholism, it is puzzling why this treatment approach has been largely overlooked.

    Dr David Nutt, former advisor on drugs to the government, said: I think this study is very interesting and it is a shame the last of these studies were done in the 1960s. I think these drugs might help people switch out of a mindset which is locked into addiction or depression and be a way of helping the brain switch back to where it should be, in a similar way that Alcoholics Anonymous programs do.
    Last edited by mr peabody; 07-07-2018 at 10:26.
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    LSD in the treatment of alcohol addiction

    Around 1952, Humphrey Osmond and I had become familiar with psychotomimetic reactions induced by LSD. There was a marked similarity between these reactions and schizophrenia and the toxic psychoses. Delirium Tremens (DT's) is one of the common toxic states, and it occurred to us LSD might be used to produce models of DT's. Many alcoholics ascribed the beginning of their recovery to hitting bottom, and often that meant having a particularly memorable attack of DT's. We thought that LSD could be used this way with no risk to the patient. We treated our first two alcoholics at the Saskatchewan Hospital, Weyburn, Saskatchewan, and one recovered.

    Other early pilot studies were encouraging, and we increased the tempo of our research until at one time six of our major psychiatric centers in Saskatchewan were using it. As of now, we must have treated close to one thousand alcoholics.

    Within a few years after our first patients were treated, we became aware that a large proportion of our alcoholics did not have psychotomimetic reactions. Their experiences were exciting and pleasant, and yielded insight into their drinking problems. It became evident that a new phenomenon had been recognized in psychiatry. Osmond created the word psychedelic to define these experiences, and announced this at a meeting of the New York Academy of Sciences in 1957.

    Following this, our research was aimed at improving the quality and quantity of psychedelic reactions. In the past ten years, major studies, under the direction of Dr. Ross MacLean, Hollywood Hospital, New Westminster, British Columbia, and Dr. S. Unger at Spring Grove State Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, have added materially to our knowledge of the effect of psychedelic therapy on alcoholism.

    I will not review the results of psychedelic therapy here. The one striking conclusion is that every scientist using psychedelic therapy with alcoholics found the same proportion of recoveries. Whether the experiments were considered controlled or not, about 50 per cent were able to remain sober or to drink much less. This seems to be a universal statistic for LSD therapy.






    Personal story: Ayahuasca, alcohol addiction and awakening

    By Melissa MacGregor

    Ayahuasca may not be for everyone, but it was for me. As an addict I had no fear of death, I subconsciously committed suicide daily with every shot of whiskey. Not having a fear of leaving this world behind is what brought me to the Amazon Jungle. You will get kidnapped, raped or murdered!, they all said. I told them that if I died some tragic death, at least I tried, at least I lived.

    You see, addicts dont fear death; we live it everyday. What we are afraid of is actually living, facing our fears, not feeling good enough, rejection, abandonment, reliving past traumas and abuse. But death, there is peace in that.

    Up until a year ago I had been an alcoholic for almost a decade. I grew up in a very physically and verbally abusive household with both parental figures being severe alcoholics. It didnt help that my mother and stepfather both worked in law enforcement. This made it difficult for anyone from the outside to step in.

    At the age of sixteen I was kicked out of my home and left to live on the streets. To cope with the fear of survival and my hunger pains I would turn to alcohol, heroin or cocaine. Whatever I could get my hands on. By the age of seventeen I was pregnant and in yet another abusive relationship.

    Thankfully, this beautiful child of mine grounded me. He brought me peace and stability. More importantly he brought me purpose. At nineteen I was a young single mother. I began dancing at
    a strip club, as it was the most convenient way to make a living. I could stay at home during the day, raise my child and have an alter-ego party girl lifestyle by night. It was a buffet of cash, booze and attention that temporarily filled my feelings of emptiness. This continued for the next twelve years.

    Sometimes it was easy, living on autopilot, but most of the time it wasnt. As most of us know, addiction is a progressive disease that will eventually kill you. At my worst I could easily down a bottle of 101 proof whiskey and chase it with a handful of Xanax. I was at the point where I knew I didnt have much time left on this earth.

    We have all see that show Intervention, it was like that. What these shows, the media and doctors dont tell you is that there are cures out there that are in the form of plant medicines. One is Ayahuasca, a South American tea made from the vine of the banisteriopsis caapi (which naturally contains an MAOI) and the chacruna leaf (which naturally contains DMT). Another form is iboga, the root of an African jungle shrub so powerful that is said to cure heroine addiction in one dose.

    At the time I was looking into iboga treatments in Costa Rica. The average cost at the centers I was looking at was over ten grand and I didnt have that type of money. Therefore I decided that my focus would stay on Ayahuasca. Also known as the vine of death, the vine of souls and yage.

    Through my investigations it became evident that these medicines provided more hope for addicts than that of western methods. It was curious to me why these plant medicines werent legal in the U.S. My research continued over the next few years, meanwhile my addiction spiraled out of control. I was a bartender with full access to my fix and the cash to enable my self-destructive lifestyle. When I wasnt working in a bar I was drinking in one. Always on one side of the bar or the other.

    In May of 2013 I finally got the job I always wanted working for a big name in the industry. I thought that this was finally going to make me happy but it didnt. My drinking and depression worsened to the point where I only left my bed to go to the bar to numb myself enough to go to work. Then do it all over again. I was at my bottom and found myself looking into every western recovery program I could find. Some I had already tried and the thought of a Twelve Step meeting, sitting in a circle talking about my problems, didnt resonate with me.

    Dont get me wrong, it may work for some but I didnt feel it was for me. I knew many people who had tried this method and failed. The success rate of rehab is shockingly low and I wanted a cure. I didnt want to struggle with addiction every day for the rest of my life. In my mind I would have rather of kept drinking. Same struggle, same thought pattern. Like an addictive obsession my mind kept bringing me back to Ayahuasca. I now know this wasnt my mind but the sacred vine calling out to me. I made up my decision, I was either going to go down to South America and explore this option or I was ultimately going to die. This was it, no looking back.

    After carefully researching and making connections I got in touch with a family in Ecuador. I booked a flight for November 11th, scrambled to get my passport, quit my job and learned a few phrases in Spanish. A month later I found myself in the Amazon Jungle about to drink one of the most powerful hallucinogens known to man. I was terrified, my life as I knew it was about to change.

    Before my first ceremony I sat in the darkness of the jungle among seven strangers who all looked just as terrified as I felt. I thought about my journey to this place, to this very moment.
    How I had traveled for the first time internationally as a woman who didnt speak the native tongue. That was enough to show me that there was a whole life to be lived and all I had to do
    was go for it.

    I drank my cup of Ayahuasca and gave it thanks. Those first two ceremonies I didnt feel much. They say that the medicine is gentle with you and likes you to get to know her first. I could
    feel her moving through my body like an anaconda diagnosing me. I didnt have many visions but there were a few letting me know that I was safe and had nothing to fear.

    On the third day we hiked further into the jungle and prepared to go deeper into our consciousness. We didnt drink Ayahuasca that night; instead we had a tobacco ceremony. We drank a whole bowl full of tea made of mapacho or sacred tobacco. It was to further purify and cleanse our bodies to prepare us to accept the medicine of Ayahuasca.

    We had to drink this as fast as possible and wait 45 minutes and then we would purge. After this ceremony the Shaman, more commonly referred to in the Amazon as Maestro or Curandero, turned to me and said, You have not bled for a long time. This was true but how did he know this? I didnt tell anyone. I had a thirteen year old son but had been trying for years to get pregnant and couldnt. I felt as if another child would heal my sorrow.

    I had been to different doctors and referred to specialists but couldnt get any answers. He said he wanted to give me a healing. He cleansed negative energy from what I now know was my sacral chakra (below the belly button, just above the pubic bone). I went to bed that night confused. What was this? What was going on? What am I doing here? I didnt feel any different. Maybe this isnt working.

    The following night we all gathered in the Maloka, or ceremony house. I'll start by saying that what happened in that ceremony was the most incredible experience of my life. As the medicine started to take effect I began to notice a veil was lifting. I was entering another place or dimension. I was being raised out of my body by beings made of colorful light. These beings did not look like hallucinations. It felt as if my physical eyes were closed but my third eye was completely opened. This made me nervous but also felt assuring and safe, like a child protected by an unseen force. These entities or beings, later known to me as my healing team surrounded me and opened up my chest filling it with a bright white light.

    About fifteen of them took turns blowing and sending more light into my heart. I was filled with the most tremendous feeling of love words cannot even begin to describe. It was a warm,
    infinite unconditional love. Tears were streaming out of my eyes and for the first time. I felt pure joy. It was beyond anything I had ever experienced before.

    When they were finished with my heart they started at my feet and went through every cell in my body cleansing out toxins. They got to my stomach showing me that the processed food I had been eating was poisoning me. They came to my lungs and showed me all the damage that years of smoking had caused. My stomach started bubbling with all of this sickness they had cleansed from my organs. They brought me back into my body so I could purge but I struggled to make it to the bathroom.

    It violently came out from both ends for what seemed like hours. Vomiting and defecating simultaneously while having visions that I was releasing pain, fear, years of alcohol and drugs, toxins from food, childhood trauma, rape, abandonment, rejection, self doubt and self hate. All of which were venomously pouring out of my body at the same time. I was shown that in order to make room for love I would have to purge all of the negativity in my life. I wanted it all out. I was done with all of it and ready to let it go.

    After the visions stopped and the purging subsided I started to clean my self up. I noticed blood. I had started my period. I hadnt bled in over five years. This was a miracle. This was real. Everything I had just experienced was real. The last thing these spirits said to me before they left that night was the only thing that mattered was love. That we were all connected. We were one, and in that moment I felt a part of it all, every tree in the jungle, every animal and bug, the water, the wind, the ground I walked on. We were all made up of the same thing, energy and love.

    I spent the next six months traveling Peru and Ecuador learning the secrets of different plant medicines. Ayahuasca cured me of infertility, hypothyroidism, anxiety, depression, PTSD, and most importantly it freed me from addiction. It cleansed my body of toxins, reset my brain to a pre-addictive state and expelled my negative thought patterns. I was able to step outside my world as an ego, as a victim, and as an addict to see who I truly was, what I truly was, a being created of love. I understood that this body was a gift for me to use to explore this beautiful garden of a planet. Liberated from fear, limits and restrictions, if I choose to walk the path of love, I would remain free, but it was a choice.

    Over the next few months my weight stabilized and I felt more alive than ever. I started eating only raw natural living foods. I made sure to drink clean water free of fluoride and other chemicals. I had been initiated by the plants, spirits and Mother Earth herself. The secrets of these plant medicines have been kept hidden in the Amazon jungle for thousands of years, and have seemingly been waiting for the moment that we needed them most. That time is now.

    Our beautiful home and planet is dying and we are being called to save her. The only way to do this is to wake up and start loving ourselves and every living thing on the earth. We must start with the food we eat. This is most important. After this everything else will start to fall into place. Ask yourself: Am I loving myself by putting this in my body? Does it nourish and heal? Like the cells in our body, we make up this earth, just like the planets make up our solar system. If we are not feeding and hydrating our cells properly they cannot do their job and this will cause DIS-EASE. Let food by thy medicine and medicine be thy food.

    The reality of our outer worlds is simply a reflection of our inner worlds. We need our Mother to live, so do your part and start loving yourself. Its not easy, I know. Ive spent the last year cleansing my body and mind, dealing with my past and fear of the future. As I write this today I can say that I have no desire to harm my body with any substance or toxic chemical from food or otherwise. If it didnt grow from the Earth with love I dont want to put it in my body. I am now a messenger of the Mother with only this heart full of love and a story to tell. I love you all.



    Habib Koite Takamba
    Last edited by mr peabody; 11-08-2018 at 04:37.
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    21-06-2017

    Quote Originally Posted by tired of crap View Post
    Great topic (as is the one on smoking cessation and psychedelics - which I also found a useful tool to aid in getting myself off cigarettes). Ill briefly share my story...

    I used alcohol as an escape to a toxic relationship, both of which, the alcoholism and the relationship, lasted about 8 years (the relationship was about 10, but I didnt find I needed a drink during the honeymoon phase haha). Eventually the relationship came to an end and I wanted to quit drinking but it was now ingrained into my lifestyle as I was previously drinking up to 5 days a week (usually around 250 mg of alcohol a sitting - be it beer, wine or liquor). I cried quitting cold turkey and thankfully, I did not experience any symptoms of withdrawal. But these attempts would only last for a week (maybe two) before Id be back to drinking.

    Eventually, I realized if I created new positive habits I would be less likely to revert to drinking. I implemented a routine including a proper diet, exercise (cardio and strength and yoga), meditation and writing in a diary. And this was incredibly helpful. But then life came a knocking (be it the loss of a loved on or merely a crap mark on my midterm) and back to drinking I went.

    Pondering my situation one day I wondered why I hadnt considered psychedelics. They were ever so useful tools so long ago (haha + 10 years ago) but I moved away from them when I was drinking as I didnt like what they showed me - ME, as a drunkard. At first I was hesitant as I had not quite processed some recent events (the loss of my mom and a good friend) but each time I reverted to drinking I thought 'well why not, at least they wont cause any physical harm' (likely), much unlike my drinking was doing.

    So in an attempt to change my brain (read habits) I came up with a plan that included weekly dosing of various psychedelics (my use of the term is not that of the classic serotonergic psychedelics but is more in line with Osmonds "To fathom Hell or soar angelic, just take a pinch of psychedelic" - and includes edible pot extracts and disassociates as well) such that cross tolerance would be minimized, so as to maximize the effects (read insights) of each trip. It has been 6 weeks since I last had a drink. Although I still crave after stressful events I am happy to report that most days I am no longer interested in drinking. Although I recognize that Im not out of the woods yet I am thankful to be able to see the tress through the forest ....

    Like any drug psychedelics have both risks and rewards and are not beyond being abused or used without any real intent (read recreationally) but when used purposefully I feel like they can offer insights and understandings that may otherwise be unattainable (ie via meditation), especially within the same time frame.

    My advice to anyone contemplating psychedelics as an augment to other forms of change (whatever they may be) is to do your research, know exactly what your taking (as Ive seen some pretty scary stories about what some people are getting these days) and know yourself (and if you dont start low, hell even if you do, start low - nothing worse than an ass kicking when your looking for some love and sympathy).

    Much love
    TOC
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    Can LSD cure society's alcohol problem?

    By Patrick Smith

    Alcohol abuse is one of the biggest health problems in the world.

    Alcohol is highly addictive, highly toxic, and does unrivaled damage to society. In the US, tens of thousands die from alcohol-related disease every year, making it the fourth-highest preventable cause of death. Alcohol abuse costs the US over $200 billion a year, and EU countries pay around 125 billion a year over 1% of these countries GDPs.

    Worldwide, alcohol misuse is the leading cause of premature death for 15-49 year olds. In 2010, Professor David Nutt and a panel of experts ranked alcohol as the most harmful drug in the UK, in terms of both its harm to users and others. Alcohol addiction is powerful, dangerous and deadly.

    Angel in disguise

    Ironically, hope for treating alcoholism could lie in a drug that government regards as one of the most dangerous in existence; LSD. After its discovery as a psychedelic drug in the 1960s, LSD was used by therapists who thought its effects could help treat problems like depression and addiction. When LSD was classed as an illegal drug, its use in therapy dwindled, and research into its potentially healing properties was stifled.

    Although LSD research is still possible today, its extremely expensive and highly restricted; costs increase tenfold compared to trials on unrestricted compounds, and jumping the necessary hurdles can take many years. Before LSD was made illegal, a considerable amount of research was published in the 60s and early 70s, when it was still easy to obtain and therapists were convinced of its medical value.

    Recently, two scientists decided to look back on six of these studies to see if there is really any merit in using LSD as a treatment for alcoholism.

    The research is out there

    Krebs & Johansen found 6 randomised controlled trials from the 60s and 70s that used LSD to treat alcoholism. They analysed the accuracy and design of the trials, to ensure that there was no experimenter bias or messy science. They then attempted to merge the results of the six trials, to see if LSD really did help patients recover from alcoholism.

    The six trials were mostly similar; they had all recruited alcoholics who were looking for treatment, the participants had no underlying mental health conditions, and patients were randomised into control or treatment groups. The studies varied in how LSD was administered; dose varied from 200-800ug. Participants also received variable support throughout the experiment, with some having access to psychotherapy during the experience, and others being given very little information about LSDs effects and left without any guidance. All the studies measured the participants alcoholism in similar ways, using tests of alcohol dependence and misuse.

    Pooling the results from these 6 studies, Krebs & Johansen found that LSD treatment significantly reduced participants alcohol misuse, and improved their attempts at abstinence from alcohol, compared to control groups.

    Overall, 59% of participants who had undergone LSD treatment improved in alcohol misuse scores, compared to 38% of control participants, which was highly statistically significant. After six months, 40% of LSD treated participants had abstained from alcohol, compared to only 28% of control participants; again, a highly significant result. After 12 months, the effects had mostly worn off, with participants returning to control group levels of alcohol misuse; but this initial benefit of LSD treatment on alcoholism is considerably greater than any currently available treatment!

    There is something remarkable about this meta-analysis; despite six trials having drastically different approaches to LSD administration, they all showed that LSD treatment has a positive effect on alcoholism. Although the effects only lasted a year, its possible that more frequent and more controlled LSD-assisted psychotherapy could produce a prolonged recovery from alcoholism.
    Last edited by mr peabody; 08-08-2018 at 06:52.
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    [VIDEO] Ben Sessa | Using MDMA to treat alcoholism: A UK study


    This talk will firstly outline briefly the historical treatment of addictions with psychedelics and the burden of alcohol abuse in society. I will describe the impact of trauma in cases
    of addictions and outline the pharmacological and therapeutic effects of MDMA and why it could be useful to treat alcoholism. Then I describe the project we are starting in Bristol, UK, developing a study to provide a course of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for adults post-alcohol detox. I will describe the challenges associated with this sort of work and the importance of psychedelics therapies for the future of psychiatry.

    https://slideslive.com/38898609/usin...ism-a-uk-study
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    [VIDEO] Robert Rhatigan | Ayahuasca for alcohol addiction

    A New York City native, Robert Rhatigan is a Research Scientist with the Geospatial and Population Studies Department at the University of New Mexico. This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Robert Rhatigan struggled with alcoholism for over ten years. When numerous attempts to overcome addiction through will-power and conventional treatment failed, he traveled to the Peruvian Amazon for treatment from local shamans. After four challenging ceremonies with a purgative, psychedelic plant medicine his desire for alcohol dissolved and a quest to understand his transformation began.

    https://youtu.be/A5MIcNeYjCc?t=12
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    World's first trials of MDMA to treat alcohol addiction set to begin


    By Hannah Devlin

    Doctors in Bristol are set to begin the worlds first clinical study into the use of MDMA to treat alcohol addiction.

    Researchers are testing whether a few doses of the drug, in conjunction with psychotherapy, could help patients overcome addiction more effectively than conventional treatments. The small trial was granted ethical approval a few weeks ago and the team expects to give the first dose of MDMA, the active ingredient in ecstasy pills, within the next two months.

    Ben Sessa, a clinical psychiatrist on the trial and senior research fellow at Imperial College London said: We know that MDMA works really well in helping people who have suffered trauma and it helps to build empathy. Many of my patients who are alcoholics have suffered some sort of trauma in their past and this plays a role in their addiction.

    Twenty patients, recruited through the recreational drug and alcohol services in Bristol, will be given the drug in capsule form during two supervised treatment sessions. The participants will be heavy drinkers typically consuming the equivalent of five bottles of wine a day who have relapsed into alcoholism repeatedly after trying other forms of treatment.

    After 100 years of modern psychiatry our treatments are really poor, said Sessa, speaking at the Breaking Convention conference in London. The chances of relapse for these patients are really high, 90% at three years. No one has ever given MDMA to treat alcoholism before.

    After the patients have undergone physical detox, they will be given two standard therapy sessions without the drug, followed by an all-day session where they are given a high dose of MDMA in capsule form. During this session they will spend some time talking to a therapist and some time lying down with an eyemask in a state of quiet meditation.

    Sessa said a misconception is that the treatment is all about the drug. Its using drugs to enhance the relationship between the therapist and the patient, and it allows us to dig down and get to the heart of the problems that drive long-term mental illness, he said.

    The trial, led by scientists at Imperial College London, will aim to assess the safety of the treatment and give a preliminary indication of whether the therapy might hold therapeutic promise.

    It comes at a time of rapidly increasing interest in the use of psychedelics in medicine. One US study published last year produced remarkable results when people with advanced cancer who were suffering depression and anxiety were treated with a single high dose of psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms. In 80% of cases, the patients condition improved and the effects endured for six to eight months.

    This is not a fringe trial. Its careful, methodical, extremely rigorous science, said Sessa.
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    Jimi Hendrix' Band of Gypsys Message To Love


    Ibogaine – an alcoholic's testimonial


    Three weeks ago I made a decision to quit alcohol and signed myself up for addiction treatment in this famous drug detoxification hospital that is treating alcoholism too. Ive been drinking for
    15 years, and over that time I did a lot of bad things I regret. I hurt my parents, destroyed my marriage, passed out on the streets, and only remember some people picking me up and taking me to hospital. The worst thing was a car accident that was entirely my fault. It was the worst thing for me since I put another person’s life in danger.

    I havent been drinking since, but I wanted somehow to seal my decision. That’s when I found on the internet about Ibogaine session at a drug detox clinic. I read that it can help me clear my mind, work out issues that I have, and completely erase the idea of alcohol. I scheduled my appointment at the clinic that provides Ibogaine session. On my first day at the clinic, psychologist did tests on me, asking me about my life, and experiences with alcohol. Then he explained to me how the session works, when it starts, how it looks like, what to expect, and how long it lasts. I was also given the book about Ibogaine that had more details about it. I was excited and I couldn’t wait for tomorrow’s session. I wasnt concerned at all. I slept well.

    The next morning I wasnt allowed to have breakfast. I was given infusion instead. After that, I was transferred into a room where my ibogaine session was going to take place. It was a room with a dimmed light. That is because my eyes would become sensitive to light during the session. There was one bed, and I was asked to lay there. Psychologist, that was going to be with me over the whole session (that lasts about 6 hours), gave me one pill of Ibogaine. He explained that it was a test dosage, and that I should report if I feel any itchiness. Since I had no allergic reaction, I was given 2 more pills, 20 minutes after the first. My psychologist gave me headphones connected to the CD player that played relaxation music, which I really enjoyed. I was connected to monitors, so my pulse, oxygen level and blood pressure could be checked all the time. Before putting headphones on, psychologist told me to think about my childhood. A cloth was put over my eyes, and so it began.

    Nothing happened for 40 minutes. I was thinking about various situations that happened in my childhood. Then I felt some sensations in my body. My thoughts were slowing down. Then I felt my body was heavy and as if I was getting out of my body. Then it happened, I started seeing pictures, real vivid pictures. And they were changing fast. First I saw pictures of my childhood, but then about me getting drunk and things that I did. It made me sick of myself. I saw myself in the future as alcoholic, with no friends, no job, lying on the street. I saw my soul as a light,
    a pulsating light, and it was looking for another suit, a better suit that my soul could wear. I saw the soul of my brother that committed suicide, and I finally made a peace with that. I saw yellow light and my brother. I felt safe. Then I said It’s done! I saw my life without alcohol and it felt great. I felt relieved. The pictures slowly faded away, and my session was over. Six hours went by fast. I remained in bed pleased that I saw my soul, and I knew that I have to take care of it.

    The ibogaine session was a powerful experience for me, and helped me resolve the issues I had.

    -anon
    Last edited by mr peabody; 29-06-2018 at 09:51.
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    Ibudilast shows promise for treating alcoholism


    By Stuart Wolpert

    UCLA researchers have found that an anti-inflammatory drug used in Japan to treat asthma could help people overcome alcoholism.

    Their study is the first to evaluate the drug, ibudilast, as a treatment for alcoholism. Study participants were given either the drug (20 milligrams for two days and 50 milligrams for the next four) or a placebo for six consecutive days. After about a two-week break, those who took the drug were switched to a placebo for six days, and those who were taking the placebo were given ibudilast. The researchers found that the subjects craving for alcohol was significantly lower when they were taking the medication.

    In addition, the participants reactions were measured after they were asked to hold and smell a glass of their preferred alcoholic beverage but not allowed to drink it. The subjects reported being in a better mood while they were taking ibudilast than when they were on the placebo.

    The research evaluated 17 men and seven women who, prior to the study, reported drinking alcohol an average of 21 days per month and drinking seven alcoholic beverages per day when they drank. On the sixth day of each phase of the study, participants received an intravenous dose of alcohol, the equivalent of about four drinks to test how the medicine interacts with alcohol and whether it can be safely administered when people are drinking. (Participants stayed overnight at the UCLA Clinical and Translational Research Center, where the study was conducted.)

    We found that ibudilast is safe and well-tolerated, said Lara Ray, a UCLA professor of psychology, director of the UCLA Addictions Laboratory and the studys lead author. This medication can be safely administered, including when people are drinking alcohol.

    Side effects from the drug, which included nausea and some abdominal pain, were mild, and none of the participants dropped out of the study. The research is published online by Neuropsychopharmacology, and will appear later in in the journals print edition.

    Researchers also evaluated the drugs efficacy by looking at how well and how quickly participants could recover from a stressful situation. When the study began, the researchers asked participants to describe sources of stress in their lives. On the fifth day of each phase the study when the participants were taking ibudilast and again when they were taking the placebo researchers discussed those situations with the participants. The subjects moods improved much more quickly after hearing about their own stressful situations when they were taking ibudilast than when they received the placebo.

    The treatment seemed to especially help those in the study who had depressive symptoms, which are common in heavy drinkers of alcohol. The drug appears to reduce the pleasurable effects of alcohol.

    Chronic alcohol consumption elevates brain inflammation in animals, and earlier research showed that ibudilast was effective in reducing rats alcohol consumption. But it wasnt a foregone conclusion that it would also be effective in humans, Ray said. Other drugs that have shown promise in rats caused too many negative side effects in humans. That is a common problem when medications tested on animals are then evaluated for human use. Ray said that many medications that are effective in animal studies ultimately fail to help people, a phenomenon
    she called the valley of death of pharmaceutical development.

    We are excited to see that the strong animal data with ibudilast is now followed by our finding that ibudilast is well-tolerated in humans, she said.

    Ray, whose laboratory studies the causes of and possible treatments for drug and alcohol addiction, said testing new treatments for alcoholism is critical because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved only four treatments for alcoholism, and they have been only modestly effective.

    Although the new study is promising, further clinical trials are needed, said Ray, who is also a member of the UCLA Brain Research Institute. Ibudilast is not currently available as a treatment
    for alcoholism.

    Ray plans to test the drug on heavy drinkers who expressly want to quit drinking. (Those in the current study were not trying to quit.) She also plans to study how ibudilast reduces brain inflammation.

    Rays laboratory is recruiting people who want to quit smoking cigarettes and reduce their alcohol consumption. Participants will receive free medication and counseling. Candidates may call 310-206-6756 for information.

    The studys co-authors are Steven Shoptaw, professor of family medicine, psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences; Keith Heinzerling, associate professor of family medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine; doctoral student Spencer Bujarski; project scientist Daniel Roche; and Karen Miotto, a clinical professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior.

    The medication was provided by MediciNova, which manufactures ibudilast.

    • • •

    My ibudilast sobriety diary

    by anethe_s

    It has been a little less than a month since I began taking ibudilast. I am stunned and pleased by how helpful the ibudilast is for me. I hesitated to post about it or mention it, though,
    because ibudilast is off-label right now for alcohol use. On the other hand, after forty years of drinking (with five sober years stuck in there) I have never encountered anything that could simply cut the pleasure out of a drink and make it so unappealing to have one. I think ibudilast could be an amazing tool for sobriety; it has also shown promise for treating meth addiction via the same mechanism, simply cutting the reward pathway for the drug while not impairing it from being activated in healthy ways, such as by exercise or hobbies.

    Ive decided to post here to share my ongoing experiences with ibudilast as a tool in building and strengthening my resistance to drinking, in order to document my experiences and the effectiveness of the drug in helping to maintain my sobriety. It is also worth mentioning that I am seeing a cognitive-behavioral therapist, attending a secular sobriety support group (not 12-step), and using several books on quitting drinking as well. I hope this information on ibudilast will be helpful to others.

    Initial regimen: 50mg ibudilast once in the morning, for seven days. I continued to drink during this time with the aim of slowly reducing consumption over the week, but I found that I drank much less than I expected because the first drink did not make me desire more, and I stopped completely several days early. No side effects noted other than slight nausea and gassiness for the first few days (ibudilast acts on the gut.) Cravings for alcohol were cut tremendously during this time.

    Subsequent to that, 20mg ibudilast once in the morning every day, while abstaining from alcohol completely. Cravings are still slight, infrequent, and easy to deal with. Even triggering events such as alcohol commercials or passing the booze aisle in the grocery store seem to have lost their effect on me. I am also not troubled by the anxiety, irritation, and nervousness I previously experienced when stopping alcohol. Instead my mood is good and I feel good. It's awesome not to have constant cravings and thoughts about alcohol as I work on firming up my early sobriety.
    Last edited by mr peabody; 24-06-2018 at 09:42.
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    For ever grateful

    My first LSD trip pretty much cured my alcoholism. The second and third put me well on my way to working through my four year-long depression. I was utterly astounded
    by the miraculous effects, so of course I had to google it.

    A few clicks and I had, among other things, learned that:

    * LSD had, before being criminalized, been used with fantastic results to cure addiction problems, such as alcoholism, where it often took only one trip to cure the person.
    * One of the founders of AA was a strong advocate of LSD and was actually well on his way to start a program to distribute it throughout AA.
    * LSD had a far greater success rate in curing alcoholism, than the AA 12 step program has ever had.
    * LSD has also been used with great success to cure depression.
    * Albert Hofmanns 100th birthday was right around the corner and he was alive and kicking.
    * In his honour there was a LSD conference being arranged in Basel, Switzerland, and everyone who was somebody in the psychedelic community would be there, along with the guest of honour, Albert Hofmann himself.

    I had to go.

    I was flat broke, but there are moments in life that are just too important to miss. This was one of them. I was probably the most inexperienced of the whole crowd, having taken LSD four or five times by then. The lectures were absolutely amazing and confirmed scientifically the effects and experiences that I was trying to describe to friends and family.

    On the final night, after listening to Albert Hofmann tell about his first experience, there was a wonderful party on a boat. It was full of psychedelic explorers, psychonauts of all generations. There were academics and hippies mixed up with ravers and artists. And of course the best LSD I have ever encountered.

    I had never been to a rave before. My first encounter was on two drops of LSD and I couldnt believe what I was seeing. Everyone on the dance floor was dancing in the same direction and they were rediscovering and reinventing what dance, body language and social interaction was. It was as if they had taken out social programming A, and were busy programming social programming B. People were friendly and caring, not at all the type of interaction that I was used to from night clubs.

    Today is the 19th of April. It is Bicycle day. Today it is 71 years ago (1943) that Albert Hofmann first took his first intentional LSD trip to try to determine the effects of the peculiar substance that he had synthesized, while looking for a migraine cure. He took 250 micrograms, which he thought would be a threshold dose. It turned out that LSD was really potent. A threshold dose is approximately 20 micrograms. 250 micrograms is a powerful trip and feeling uneasy Hofmann early on decided to go home. Due to war time restrictions he took his bike and it was under that
    bike trip that the LSD really came to full effect.

    Thank you, Albert Hofmann, for this truly miraculous substance. And thank you, LSD, for saving my life. In honor of you, I have named my son Albert. I am forever grateful.

    -Daniel Wilby
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    Blue Cheer Feathers From Your Tree



    LSD as a treatment for alcoholism


    By Arran Frood

    The powerful psychedelic LSD has potential as a treatment for alcoholism, according to a retrospective analysis of studies published in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

    The study, by neuroscientist Teri Krebs and clinical psychologist Prjan Johansen of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, is the first-ever quantitative meta-analysis of LSD-alcoholism clinical trials. The researchers sifted through thousands of records to collect data from randomized, double-blind trials that compared one dose of LSD to a placebo.

    Of 536 participants in six trials, 59% of people receiving LSD reported lower levels of alcohol misuse, compared to 38% of people who received a placebo. We were surprised that the effect was so clear and consistent, says Krebs. She says that the problem with most studies done at that time was that there were too few participants, which limited statistical power. But when you combine the data in a meta-analysis, we have more than 500 patients and there is definitely an effect, she says. In general, the reported benefits lasted three to six months. Their findings are published today in the Journal of Psychopharmacology.

    Psychedelics were promoted by psychiatrists in the 1950s as having a range of medical uses -- to treat conditions such as schizophrenia, for example -- before political pressures in the United States and elsewhere largely ended the work. Alcoholism was considered one of the most promising clinical applications for LSD, says Johansen. Alcoholics Anonymous co-founder Bill Wilson is said to have espoused the benefits of LSD in the book Pass It On: The Story of Bill Wilson and How the AA Message Reached the World.

    In the last decade or so, however, a new generation of researchers have been interested in harnessing the therapeutic benefits of illicit drugs -- such as MDMA for post-traumatic stress disorder, ayahuasca for drug and alcohol dependency, and psilocybin, the active ingredient in hallucinogenic mushrooms, for smoking cessation.

    A snow globe of perception?

    How psychedelics exert such effects, especially after a single dose, remains unclear. LSD and its chemical cousins share structural similarities with the neurotransmitter serotonin, which is linked to many aspects of mood, memory and pleasure. These psychedelics also bind the same receptor sites in the brain as serotonin, but there the similarity may end -- studies have shown that the hallucinogens elicit chemical cascades different from other compounds that bind at the same receptor. To complicate matters further, LSD also acts at other receptors.

    For the moment, studying human behavioural responses rather than brain chemistry may be more helpful in understanding how the drugs work. Robin Carhart-Harris, a psychopharmacologist at Imperial College London who has researched how psilocybin could treat depression, says that psychedelics must work at both biological and psychological levels. Psychedelics probably work in addiction by making the brain function more chaotically for a period -- a bit like shaking up a snow globe -- weakening reinforced brain connections and dynamics, he says.

    Roland Griffiths, a behavioural biologist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, is investigating the influence of psilocybin on smoking cessation, and says that psychedelics sometimes give rise to distinctive, insightful experiences that can produce enduring positive changes in attitude, mood and behaviour.

    This is impressive and important work,
    says Matthew Johnson, a psychiatrist also at Johns Hopkins University who is now running a small trial looking at the effectiveness of psilocybin to treat nicotine addiction. Although this meta-analysis does not replace the need to test the approach in new, well-designed and rigorous clinical trials, it puts some more muscle behind the interpretation that the older literature shows hints that psychedelic therapy might really help addiction.

    However, Ken Checinski, a consultant addiction psychiatrist and independent researcher based in London, says that although the results are exciting, no pharmacological treatment should be seen as a magic bullet and that modern therapeutic techniques have improved. The LSD trials pre-date the use of psychological techniques such as motivational interviewing and cognitive behaviour therapy, he says.
    Last edited by mr peabody; 25-09-2018 at 08:57.
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    30-07-2017

    Quote Originally Posted by HoldBack View Post
    I remember a 2C-I trip I was on. Really standard around 20-25 mg orally.

    I had this enormous clarity about how much I'm fucking up my life with opiates. That was like 5 years ago and things have gotten significantly worse for me since. A regular dose 2C-I trip may not be what these articles are talking about and a heavy trip with more potent psychedelics may be required for lasting change. I have always wanted to try the whole ibogaine thing but feel like I'm too narrow-minded of a person to get any benefit.
    Quote Originally Posted by tired of crap View Post
    I find these substances only provide the insight, you (I, we) have to put in the hard work during the in between times. Imo one off mystical trips that end drug abuse are rare but can and do happen..

    Personally I had weekly trips on various substances (that avoided cross tolerances) for the first month. Now I try for about once a month for an intense psycheledic trip but supplement with a solid dose of edibles on most other weekend. My goal is every 6 to 8 weeks for the psychs - even after Im free of alcohol, simply because I enjoy them haha.

    Have i slipped during my recovery. Yes. And thats ok. These habits took years to learn and its my guess itll take me just as long to completely unlearn. Imo failures are fine if we learn from them.
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    Last edited by mr peabody; 11-07-2018 at 21:29.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tired of crap View Post
    And thank you Mr Peabody for starting all these wonderful threads.

    I feel these substances (psychedelics) are invaluable tools in understanding: ourselves, our choices and a multitude of other things, whatever it may be that we are attempting to understand more fully. Our community has known this for a long time but Im elated to hear and read of the psychedelic renaissance, as far as legitimate research is concerned.

    But what I read is a lot of studies where there is a single dose, or perhaps a smaller follow up a few days or weeks later, usually accompanied with psychotherapy throughout. Which is great if it works but in my opinion these sorts of mystical experiences arent always achievable (as many of us are aware, dose is not the only factor). Even if they are, are they truly sustainable for long-term results? In my opinion no. Furthermore, most of us dont have the option to or for whatever reason are opposed to psychotherapy..

    So I share my story, to show that these substances are not a panacea but rather a guiding light, especially through dark times, which when used appropriately, with care and a little hard work can help us achieve our goals - whatever they may be.
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    Depression, Alcoholism, and Ayahuasca


    By Erica Baran Fasano

    The day of my ayahuasca ceremony finally arrived. I had never been so excited to get there, get started, and get it over with. The two months leading up to this day had been like the 12 days
    of Christmas. I was dying to open up my beautifully wrapped presents under the tree. Except, this was a different type of unwrapping altogether. As my friends and I arrived to the ceremonial space, we were greeted by other participants sitting on their beds on the floor alongside their buckets facing the shamans alter. My friends and I turned towards each other as I said, What the hell did I get us into? But, there was no turning back now. It was go time. We set up our beds and buckets at our assigned seats. The ceremony started promptly at 5pm.

    The shaman sat down, welcomed the newcomers as there had been a ceremony the evening prior. He briefly explained how he was going to dose and serve the Ayahuasca over the course of the ceremony. We are asked to state our intentions before our first serving of the medicine. Then, we begin. I sat in between by friends as we prepare to to take our doses. I have never been
    so terrified. Little did I realize that this night was about to change the rest of my life forever. After everyone received their serving, we now wait for the medicine to take effect. The shaman begins chanting and singing Icaros. These are songs sung in Spanish to the spirits of plants to help them start taking effect.

    About 30-40 minutes into the ceremony, I feel the presence of the Mother inside of every cell of my body. She has come to sit with me. I felt her gently coursing through my veins, my stomach, and my mind. I felt an ultimate surrender and laid down on my bed. Then, I felt the most intense wave of nausea hit me and began to purge into my bucket. It felt amazing to throw up and I continued to do so for about an hour. I felt all of my fears, insecurities, traumas, depression, doubts, anxieties, and addictions being flung out of my body mercilessly into the bottom my bucket. I felt freedom from it all! I looked at all of the demons in my bucket and said goodbye forever. After my hour of purging came to end, I began to sob uncontrollably for another hour. I had been filled with intense gratitude, compassion and love. I felt myself as a child being held in my mothers arms rocking me back and forth hearing the words, It is ok. Im with you and I am not leaving your side. You take as much time as you need to cry. You need this.

    The Mother was consoling me as I was being shown my life in chronological order, its geneology, down to the roots of each generation. I was shown the pain and its origins in my family tree and kept saying Thank you repeatedly. I felt like I was wrapped in a blanket of unconditional love, so safe, so grateful. I clung to my blanket and pillow like they were my only possessions and felt immense gratitude for having them to hold. I felt myself going from repeatedly saying thank you to Im sorry. I felt all the pain inside of myself, my family, my past choices and the pain they caused others, and the pain that my family carries unknowingly. I felt one with it all. I was seeing it through compassionate, loving, and truthful eyes for the first time in my life.

    I finally understood the root cause of it all. I suddenly felt touched by a blissful feeling I had never experienced but always knew existed. I tuned back into the beautiful Icaros permeating the room, connecting me deeper to my Mother. I sat up and began to rock back and forth in delight. The sun was setting and the fire was radiating a glowing warmth throughout the room. I felt in love. I felt loved. I felt safe. I felt free. I felt so grateful. I felt forgiven. I felt whole again. For the next several hours of the ceremony, I was in conversation with the Mother. It was like a Q & A session, hearing her give me answers to questions Ive been seeking out for what felt like an eternity. It was like I was being rewarded for all the hard work and preparation leading up to this moment. I continued to unwrap my gifts one at a time slowly, savoring each second. I was so in each moment that it was almost impossible to think of anything else. She wouldnt allow for it. She had my commanded my undivided attention in such a seductive way, like a snake slithering rhythmically through the jungle that resides inside my body.

    I felt her presence starting to fade slowly, not wanting to part with her yet. I could have stayed there with her forever. Before she slipped away for the evening, I heard her say to me, We are just getting started. I will be here when you are ready to come back. We have more to do. I felt like I was just made love to and couldnt wait for it to happen again. It was the most amazing and most profound experience of my life. It was difficult to sleep that night as I was overloaded on processing all the new information I had just been gifted. I went outside and looked up at the stars in the night sky and cried. I felt overwhelmed with a sense of accomplishment. That I had just done something so important and life changing. My life was forever changed this night. I looked up, understanding everything, but not sure how to use this new set of vocabulary and context. I knew I had my work cut out for me in the life that was waiting for me back home.

    The next 3 months ahead of me, post-ceremony, packed a brutal punch. It was the transition and integration that proved to be the toughest part of it all. The ceremony seemed like a walk
    in the park in hindsight. I found that the plant medicine was continuing its work within the real world. I had some hard times, profound shifts, hard conversations, and found myself retreating inward to make sense of what I just did to my life. I turned it completely upside down, inside out, sideways and every which way. I felt alive again. I felt in love again with myself and my life. My consciousness was completely shifted. I was able to see all the same things with a new set of eyes, perspective and a whole new vocabulary to describe them. My depression was non-existent. I had developed a physical aversion to alcohol anytime I saw it. Remembering the part of the ceremony where the Mother showed why I do not need alcohol anymore. She explained that I used it as a coping method as well as self-medication for a very long time. I no longer needed that as Im entering a new frontier of my life that doesnt have room for that.

    Its been 13 months since to took my last drink as well as being off anti-depressants. And, Ive lost over 30 pounds. Talk about a snake shedding its old skin! My love affair with alcohol,
    deep in the throes of depression, seems like a lifetime ago. Ive been given a true gift of living a life in transformation. I have absolutely no cravings for alcohol. My creativity is off the charts. Ive been gifted with a profound and prolific time of creativity in my life. Its bubbling over with a new joy, meaning, and application. Ive found a new love for my life, my art, my music, my wife, my family, and my friends. Im in love again for the first time as I found a new relationship in my life. This new relationship has removed the veil that was once shrouded with guilt, unworthiness, self- loathing, suffering and death. I have a new life filled with unconditional love, endless support, prolific creativity, deeper meaning and purpose in my relationships and a new found self-love and a relentless self-worth. I am truly grateful for having been given another chance at my life. I am beyond humbled to share my story with others in that it may reach those who are in need of a new perspective on how to live again. You are not limited to your diagnosis. You can see it as a life sentence as I once did. Or, you can see it as a shiny new gift placed at the center of your heart, awaiting its opening.
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    A study by neuroscientist Teri Krebs of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, is the first-ever quantitative meta-analysis of LSD in alcoholism clinical trials. The researchers sifted through thousands of records to collect data from randomized, double-blind trials that compared one dose of LSD to a placebo.

    Of 536 participants in six trials, 59% of people receiving LSD reported lower levels of alcohol misuse, compared to 38% of people who received a placebo. We were surprised that the effect was so clear and consistent, says Krebs. She says that the problem with most studies done at that time was that there were too few participants, which limited statistical power. But when you combine the data in a meta-analysis, we have more than 500 patients and there is definitely an effect, she says.

    -Arran Frood


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    03-09-2017

    Quote Originally Posted by LucidSDreamr View Post
    While Im not an alcoholic...I get way too drunk way too often. 2x per week maybe more. (Maybe I am one?)

    Acid has never helped unfortunately... I might feel guilty about it during the trip...but I'm probably driink by the tail end of the trip.

    Maybe a heavier psychedelic like shrooms would work?
    Quote Originally Posted by Xorkoth View Post
    I think different things work for different people, and psychedelics aren't a magic bullet. I've had various trips where I stopped either smoking or drinking for a bit, but it didn't stick, and honestly that's because it's always around. My friends drink and smoke and I tend to want to when I'm hanging out with them. It's really about willpower and even more importantly, really wanting to stop. I drink 2-3 times a week currently and usually drink more than I intended to, and I'm working on reducing that.

    The only time that a psychedelic really permanently got me off something was ibogaine, got me off opiates. I think ibogaine is the best anti-addiction psychedelic, but also the reason it worked was because I NEEDED to quit opiates, it was destroying my life, I wanted to die, it was like, it's now or never. So I took that chance when I had it. For me, alcohol is something I worry about long-term, I know it's bad for me, but it's not destroying my life, I lead a happy and well-adjusted life with great relationships and I accomplish a lot. I just drink more than I should, and smoke. In a way that makes it harder.

    Nothing wrong with trying mushrooms for it, I definitely desire to drink more on LSD than on mushrooms. Mescaline is pretty good for not wanting to drink too. Worth a shot. But you need to get to a place where you really want to stop.
    Quote Originally Posted by Uncadollas View Post
    I've done a lot of LSD, usually when I was drunk. LSD only made me want to drink more. In no way ever did LSD slow me down or even made me think about stopping drinking. The people I tripped with all enjoyed drinking too. They all went on to be moderate drinkers or Alcoholics, None of them had their drinking effected by LSD. Tripping is enjoyable from time to time. I am not bashing LSD, I like it. I do however think that it being a road to sober living is BS.
    Quote Originally Posted by pupnik View Post
    clearly it is not just the drug that works in a regime to stop drinking,
    but a regime combined with the drug will work very much better.

    that regime would not be
    sit at a bar with your friends and order drinks.
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    Ketamine treatment for alcoholism


    Evgeny Krupitsky, MD, PhD, chief of the research laboratory at St. Petersburg Regional Center of Addictions and Psychopharmacology, has been researching the treatment of alcoholism with ketamine since the 1980s and hopes to extend his research to encompass post-traumatic stress disorder in the near future. In 1985, he developed ketamine psychedelic therapy - which was initially merely a method for increasing suggestibility and enhancing aversive treatment for alcoholism - publishing his first report on the method in 1992.

    He found that ketamine induced total abstinence in 66% of his alcoholic patients for up to a year. He observed improvement in personality profile, positive transformation of self-concept and emotional attitudes to various aspects of self, positive changes in life values, and improved spiritual development in the ketamine group. Krupitsky posited nine factors:

    1. Stable, positive psychological changes.

    2. Personality growth and self-cognition.

    3. Important insights into existential problems and the meaning of life.

    4. Transformation of ones life value system.

    5. A change of view of ones self and the world around.

    6. Insight into life and death.

    7. A rise of creative energies.

    8. Broadening of spiritual horizons.

    9. Harmonization of a persons relationships with the world and with other people.

    In 1991, another Soviet psychiatrist, Igor Kungurtsev MD, who initially worked with Krupitsky and later immigrated to the United States, published a summary of his own experiences treating alcoholism with ketamine.

    Although he initially felt that ketamine simply made alcohol aversive in a purely behavioral way, Kungurtsey radically changed his approach following a series of ketamine self-administrations and instead It is gratifying to see that NIMH is following MAPS lead in supporting the treatment of psychiatric disorders with psychedelic drugs adopted a transpersonal model for therapy in order to better utilize the profound mystical experiences induced by ketamine. He found that successful treatment of alcoholism with ketamine was correlated with a changed spiritual outlook.

    -ABSC
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    How ibogaine reverses alcohol addiction

    By Biotech Daily

    Researchers using rodent models have found that the controversial drug ibogaine reverses alcohol addiction by increasing the level of the protein GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor) in the ventral tegmental area of the brain.

    Ibogaine, which is extracted from a West African shrub, has been shown to reverse addiction to alcohol and some drugs, but potentially serious side effects have prevented its widespread acceptance.

    In a paper published in The Journal of Neuroscience, investigators at UCSF showed that ibogaine acted specifically on the ventral tegmental area of the brain. After injecting the drug into
    the brains of rats, the investigators found that loss of craving for alcohol was accompanied by an increase in the level of GDNF expressed by cells in the ventral tegmental area. Treating the animals with specific antibodies to prevent GDNF expression reversed the anti-addictive action of ibogaine, and direct injection of GDNF prevented addiction in the same manner as injection of ibogaine.

    By identifying the brain protein that ibogaine regulates to reduce alcohol consumption in rats, we have established a link between GDNF and reversal of addiction--knowledge of a molecular mechanism that should allow development of a new class of drugs to treat addiction without ibogaine's side effects, said senior author Dr. Dorit Ron, associate professor of neurology at the University of San Francisco. If we can alter the GDNF pathway, we may well have a new treatment against alcohol and drug addiction, without the unwanted side effects of ibogaine.



    The tsunami crest
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    10-10-2017

    Quote Originally Posted by Morninggloryseed View Post
    I never considered myself an alcoholic, still don't. I did begin to drink gin, nightly for half a year. It made me gain weight, and it was just alcohol... No fun.

    Ibogaine was taken in Jan 2016 for refresher and a week later and now I just have a beer.

    For me, ibogaine seems to be a great moderator. All of my friends and family, and ill assume my doctor, are ok with my beer and kratom. Gin and powerful opiates are not a lifestyle Id promote.

    If I stick with beer and kratom, and yearly iboga refreshment class I bet I come out ok.
    Quote Originally Posted by yepyepwoah View Post
    I've flipped flopped on alcoholism for about a decade. Back on the fucking liquor (Trailer Park Boys reference if you want). I hate it, I hate myself doing it. Everyone that knows me says drinking makes me an undesirable person to be around.... I just feel like... it's either that or I kill myself. There has got to be another fucking way though right?

    I'd like to try Ibogaine, but that would need some involved shit. Not a fucking person in my family would be cool with watching me "on a really serious psychedelic with lpotentially life threatening possibiliies" after all the stupid shit I've done tripping/on drugs over the years
    Quote Originally Posted by tired of crap View Post
    Just thought Id update with my progress.

    Shortly after my last post lifes stresses were "too much" and 10 years of conditioning resulted in a yet another relapse. After a few weeks worth of binging (not quite but close) to my old ways I decided I had enough. So I began tripping again, as i find when i relapse im reluctant to trip as im shown all my the behaviours im avoiding, which I dont particularly want to see (but need to).

    But as with all my attempts to utilize psychedelics to aid in riding myself of addiction the true challenge lies in integrating my learning into daily life. So although i continued to drink for a few weeks i began taking the necessary steps on my road to recovery. For me this includes a proper diet (hitting all the basics - carbs, proteins and fats), exercise (cardio, strength and yoga), meditation and most recently ive learned i need to include time spent: outdoors, partaking in hobbies and socializing.

    At this point I havent drank in 5 weeks. But honestly its not about time spent being sober anymore for me. Now its about my outlook surrounding my alcoholism. Ill try and articulate further later.

    For now, suffice to say that forgiveness and understanding plays a crucial role in moving forward, for me.
    Quote Originally Posted by Xorkoth View Post
    Good job man. I agree, with addictions it's about how you frame it in your mind, as well as filling your life with healthy, positive things. I was addicted to opiates for 10 years and I am not anymore, my ibogaine experience over 3 and a half years ago along with the work I did on my life and myself as a result transformed me. I haven't even wanted an opiate since then, and have never had any. People offer me opiates sometimes and it's no thing for me to say no. It really is not a struggle in my life anymore, I have no fear that I will become one again because it's in the past. I think the victim mentality imposed by society can be quite harmful. The fact that the phrase "once an addict, always an addict" and related phrases even exist as something that is considered a fact, almost a law, subconsciously sets people up for failure. If you can stop feeling like an addict, it helps a lot. I credit ibogaine for it, for me. Really changed my life. But we do have the power to change our thoughts about anything. It's just far easier said than done.
    Quote Originally Posted by Morninggloryseed View Post
    Cannabis helps...you can smoke again soon? Or are you a pot hater, as a number of people seem to be here?

    I never drank when cannabis was in my life.
    Quote Originally Posted by tired of crap View Post
    Thanks xorkoth and congrats on overcoming your previous addiction as well.

    Recently i was offered alcohol while at a friends, as they thought id like the taste of it. At first i was like oh no no, i cant - as previously one glass would send me down the slippery slope to relapse. But then i realized before i had merely stopped drinking but never addressed the underlying issues... After this realization i accepted a small glass without issue - not something i want to make a habit of but im glad it happened.

    And i think these sentences have a lot to do with it. Previously if i drank, even once, my attitude would be "f it, im an addict anyways, why not keep going". But now ive learned that our "mistakes dont define us, they refine us" (if we choose to learn from them that is). And overcoming the stigma of being an addict is crucial in moving forward.
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    Oh, Sweet Mary


    Using Ketamine to treat alcohol addiction


    Problem drinkers in the UK could one day have access to a new, fast-acting treatment to help them cope with the difficult first few weeks of sobriety: ketamine.

    In a new trial taking place at the University of Exeter and University College Hospital in London, researchers are using small shots of the tranquilizer alongside standard psychotherapy treatments to see if it can help treat alcoholism.

    Current effects of treatments for alcoholism are at best modest, about three quarters of people return to drinking after 6 months, so there is a dire need for new treatments, said Celia Morgan, a professor of psychopharmacology at the University of Exeter, and one of the lead researchers on the study.

    Ketamine has already been shown to be an effective treatment for depression, something that's done a lot to rehabilitate its reputation. As an antidepressant it's unique in that it acts very quickly, with patients often reporting an improvement in their mood over just one or two days.

    That could make it ideal for treating recovering alcoholics, who often suffer from depression immediately after quitting.

    We know that in alcohol dependence, depression is a predictor of relapse in the first couple of weeks. So we're able to give people the ketamine package in the time at which they might be particularly susceptible to relapse, said Morgan.

    The trial, which is funded by the UK government's medical research charity, will have participants take part in seven therapy sessions, three with shots of ketamine. Control groups will receive no drug and no therapy conditions. Ideally, the ketamine will act as a sort of stabiliser for depression, and possibly increase the power of the therapy.

    Morgan said experiments with animals show that ketamine may help form neuronal connections in the brain, and that could mean that in humans the therapy will be more effective or more likely to stick.

    There's new scientific evidence in animal models suggesting that their brains might be primed to learn more [after taking ketamine,] she said. So it could help people who are stuck in a rut with alcoholism. It may prime your brain to take on new experiences from the world.

    Morgan is not the only one pursuing this theory. Elias Dakwar, a Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at Columbia University in New York, is currently recruiting patients for a similar trial that will use ketamine treatment alongside motivational therapy for alcoholism. He says that the way people's brains adapt to addiction is similar to that of depression.

    People sort of forswear their own agency and self-efficacy, and there's a sense of resignation, he said. The thinking on ketamine's effect on depression is that it reverses depression-related adaptation through neuroplasticity.

    In other words, it could make the brain more ready to create new connections and move away from old patterns of behaviour, making it an ideal companion for therapy that's meant to help people re-evaluate and change their lives.

    The ketamine doses Morgan plans to use are higher than those used in standard depression treatment, but they're not quite enough to cause the sort of total dissociation that has led some scientists to class ketamine as a psychedelic drug, and far less than the maximum safe dose as an anaesthetic.

    Were not going for the full-blown mystical experience, Morgan said. Were looking at treatment we can do within the National Health Service as well; this is something that is funded by the government, so we are looking at things that are acceptable in that context.

    Both trials are still in the early stages: Morgan's started in June and is set to run until 2017, and Dakwar's should wrap up next year. But if the results are positive, ketamines use could expand quickly. Alcoholism, like most addictions, is notoriously difficult to treat, with few effective drugs available. And according to the NHS, nine percent of men and four percent of women in the UK show signs of alcohol dependence.

    It's one of those really intractable disorders that people have been trying to find a drug therapy for some time, said Dr Dakwar.

    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/a...ohol-addiction
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    The Beatles Tomorrow Never Knows


    Treating alcohol addiction with psilocybin


    The future of psychedelic medicine draws ever closer as research finds magic mushroom effectively treat alcohol addiction.

    The possibility of psychedelic medicine as a form of treatment is a movement gaining a lot of rapid momentum in the West. This is no more prevalent than for the treatment of addiction.
    It is an area of medical research that is spearheading the psychedelic movement, and bringing some of our favorite drugs directly into the mainstream.

    A new study, published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, has just taken this movement a mile down the road. This research shows that psilocybin (the hallucinogenic compound of magic mushrooms), significantly increases abstinence in those suffering alcohol addiction.

    Now as always, it is important to understand that we are not talking wonder cure. Simply popping a few mushrooms in your mouth is not going to necessarily help you beat addiction. It all comes down to context, and here, psilocybin is used as part of a psychosocial therapy.

    Researching mushrooms and addiction

    Within the research, participants underwent 4 weeks of counseling and assessment before being introduced to psychedelic based therapies. It was found that during the initial four weeks without psychedelics, there was no significant drop in alcohol abuse. However, as soon as participants underwent psychedelic based therapy, there was an immediate and significant increase in abstinence; as well as there being a reported attitude change towards alcohol in general. Furthermore, none of the participants suffered debilitating adverse side effects (although there were a few upset stomachs), and as a result no additional medication was required.

    What is also interesting was that researchers found a correlation between the reported intensity of the trip and the level of abstinence from alcohol. Suggesting the more profound or significant a trip was, the greater impact it had on the self being.

    As usual, more research is currently required, but for something that has been outlawed for so long, baby steps are needed when it comes to legitimate science. This study didnt have a control group to test against, neither was the sample size particularly big. But the fact they got positive results here justifies and warrants them taking experimentation further, in much more detail next time.

    https://www.zamnesia.com/blog-treati...therapies-n517
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    Alcoholism as a biochemical disease

    In the early 1950s, clinical researchers exploring the therapeutic value of the psychedelic drug d-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) achieved intriguing results with subjects suffering from alcoholism. Spiritual or transcendental experiences produced by LSD were a powerful adjunct to rehabilitative psychotherapy for alcoholics. They provided a profound and chemically-induced awakening or enlightenment that often led to sobriety. This article investigates LSD as a treatment for alcoholism. The increased focus on drug therapies brought changes in treatment options and ushered in new theoretical explanations for the causation of alcohol abuse as a disease.

    The psychiatrist Humphry Osmond was one of the key figures in the development of LSD treatments for alcoholism. Osmond was a Senior Registrar at the psychiatric unit at St Georges Hospital in London, England in 1950, where he worked closely with his colleague John Smythies and cultivated a keen interest in chemically induced reactions in the human body. Smythies and Osmond examined the properties of mescaline, the active agent in the peyote cactus. Nearly 2 years of research led them to conclude that mescaline produced reactions in volunteers that resembled the symptoms of schizophrenia, including hallucinations, delusions, disorganised thoughts and behaviour.

    Further work suggested that mescalines chemical structure was remarkably similar to adrenaline. These findings led to the theory that schizophrenia resulted from a biochemical imbalance in the sufferer. These findings led to the theory that schizophrenia resulted from a biochemical imbalance in the sufferer. This tantalizing hypothesis captivated Osmonds interest for the next 2 decades and inspired him to embark on a variety of experiments.

    Osmond and Smythies colleagues at St Georges Hospital were not particularly interested in their biochemical research, but Osmond was intent on continuing the work. After responding to
    an advertisement for a deputy director of psychiatry at a Canadian Mental Hospital in Weyburn, Saskatchewan, he and his family moved to Canada in October 1951. In the prairie province of Saskatchewan he established a biochemical research programme. Within a year, Osmond met Abram Hoffer. Hoffer had graduated from the provincial university in Saskatoon with a Bachelor of Sciences degree in agricultural chemistry. He later graduated with a Ph.D. in agriculture before beginning a medical degree the following year. In medical school, Hoffer developed a particular interest in psychiatry. On 1 July 1950, the Saskatchewan Department of Public Health hired the recently graduated Hoffer to establish a provincial research programme in psychiatry.

    Hoffer and Osmond soon joined forces and began collaborating on their mutual research interests in biochemical experimentation. Osmonds curiosity about mescaline soon introduced him to d-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), which, he discovered, produced similar reactions to those observed with mescaline. However, LSD was a much more powerful drug. As in the case of mescaline, early trials with LSD, too, seemed to substantiate their theory that mental illness had biochemical roots.

    During their initial LSD experiments, Hoffer and Osmond hypothesised that the drug might possess therapeutic benefits. In 1953 they began introducing the drug to a new set of subjects: diagnosed alcoholics. They wanted to test its curative effects on individuals for whom temperance reformers advocated the development of more will power and self-actualisation. Perhaps, they reasoned, the LSD reaction would cultivate precisely that kind of strength and insight. Early trials with LSD seemed to substantiate their theory that mental illness had biochemical roots. Osmond reasoned that it would not be difficult to convince lay people that excessive drinking or alcoholism, as a disease, constituted a meaningful concept.

    In Saskatchewan in the 1950s, LSD played a prominent role in reconstructing alcoholism as a disease. The growing public perception of drunkenness as a physiological condition reinforced the need for medical attention and, moreover, redefined problem drinking behaviour as something that could be cured.

    Condensed from the study found here: http://www.maps.org/research-archive...ck_22866_1.pdf



    Last edited by mr peabody; 20-08-2018 at 11:41.
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