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Thread: Is asking for black cofee insulting?

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    #26
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    I do love both coffee and cigarettes.
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    #27
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    Me too, its a toss up of which I love more....
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    #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by JessFR View Post
    I do love both coffee and cigarettes.
    That was the absolute hardest to give up for me when I gave up smoking. Grind the beans, pour the water, wait for the drip and light up. Hand and glove, those two substances/acts.

    I doubt I will ever give up coffee but I am really glad to have put cigarettes behind me for over 35 years now. I hate to break it to you innocent young'uns but there comes a time with age where you have to severely cut back your coffee intake or you will never sleep again. Unless you live in the midwest where they drink brown water and call it coffee. My relatives there drink it non-stop all day but basically it is sepia tone water.
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    #29
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    The never sleep again I shall!
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    #30
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    ^ Well, I didn't mention the other problems that go along with it but who am I to ruin youthful enjoyment when you can drink all the damn coffee you want? Go for it and enjoy it twice as much for me.
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    #31
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    Ah the synergy of coffee and tobacco. Like two peas in a pod. Brothers and sworn allies. Lennon and McCartney, okay in isolation but together the fucking beatles.

    Try a mocha with strong dark chocolate and coffee and light up a hand rolled ciggy. The theobromine, caffeine and nicotine will dance as one.
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    #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by swilow View Post
    Ah the synergy of coffee and tobacco. Like two peas in a pod. Brothers and sworn allies. Lennon and McCartney, okay in isolation but together the fucking beatles.

    Try a mocha with strong dark chocolate and coffee and light up a hand rolled ciggy. The theobromine, caffeine and nicotine will dance as one.
    Indeed. I'm not all that much of a stim person, opiates are my drug of choice. But as good as tobacco coffee and chocolate are together, the only thing that might just improve those things together slightly more is maybe some amphetamines or something.

    I vividly remember spending hours on the phone taking to friends at McDonald's, drinking coffee and smoking cigarettes while on a small dose of Dexamphetamine (wasn't meth at the time but it has a very similar effect). Of course this was back when smoking at McDonald's was legal in Sydney Australia.

    I don't want to glorify drug abuse here of course, I'm fortunate that I don't seem to have a stimulant problem and can use amphetamines without it becoming a problem (unlike opiates which can destroy my life real fast). But obviously some people have a real problem with it. I don't think what I'm describing HAS to be drug abuse even if it's very enjoyable. But it will be like that for many people.

    Just like the reverse where some people can enjoy opiates without them taking over their life, but I can't.

    The important part is knowing what you can handle. For me, I can handle amphetamines and alcohol, and can't handle opiates. For others it's the other way around or something in between. But damn amphetamine with coffee and cigarettes and something to do like socializing can be real fun.
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    #33
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    If someone was rude to me and still expecting my money I would not give them my money. I would get their name. I would get their boss on the phone. I would get them fired .

    I don't care what colour the person is no body gets in the way of my coffee. Iced coffee with ice cream.


    Mind you my dad has trouble ordering a plain cup of white coffee. It's either a latte or espresso or mocha whatever.

    A plain coffee does not exist.


    He probably misunderstood you but I dunno.
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    #34
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    For whatever reason, I can take 300mg of pure caffeine in a pill, or even one that has taurine too, and feel nice and energized, but if I drink one strong cup of coffee it'll make me feel SO uncomfortable. Like dripping with sweat, slippery hands and feel, peeing every 10-15 minutes, anxious, and just overall feeling like a mess. It didn't used to be that way either, when I was 17/18/19/20, I drank lots and lots of coffee, and I loved it. But it's gradually gotten rough for me. To me, it's the absolute dirtiest feeling way to get caffeine and it's very rare I drink it because if I do it has to be very slowly and it's still kind of uncomfortable.

    I do love it though, I love the smell and taste.
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    #35
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    I LOVE coffee but I prefer tea at home. I really enjoy a lovely cuppa or 6.

    I'm similar with the sweats though. Drinking too much tea or coffee can make me sweat a bit. I don't have that side effect with caffeine pills.
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    #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sadie View Post
    I LOVE coffee but I prefer tea at home. I really enjoy a lovely cuppa or 6.

    I'm similar with the sweats though. Drinking too much tea or coffee can make me sweat a bit. I don't have that side effect with caffeine pills.
    You ever notice how people can have accents even when what's said is entirely in text?
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    #37
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    Have you ever heard my accent?

    Hmmm, what do you imagine I sound like? I'm intrigued.
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    #38
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    British? OK yeah I know that's not very specific. OK let's go an English accent. Still lots of room to narrow down but if it's right that's still not bad.
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    #39
    When I lived in Italy, my buddy came to visit from the U.S and I took him out for a night of drinking. I order him a negroni (an Italian cocktail made of one part gin, one part vermouth rosso (red, or semi-sweet), and one part Campari, garnished with orange peel.) He likes it a lot. I teach him how order it in Italian and send him off to the bar counter to get another round. when he gets to the counter, the bar tender is a tall, slender black woman. This throws him off. He doesn't know any Italian, so can't explain his confusion, he just knows to go to the bar and ask for a "Negroni," but now becomes really uncomfortable. Is ordering a Negroni from a black person offensive towards negros? He stumbles, makes to leave, then decides it's too late and proceeds with order. He stutters a few times then blurts out "un ne-ne-negroni" to the black waitress. The waitress and I started cracking up understanding the reason for his discomfort.

    Anyways, nothing wrong with ordering black coffee. I once embarrassed myself at a department store cause I didn't know if it was appropriate to call a black person a black person. A black store clerk helped me with my order, then when I go to pay a different person (asian) asks me if anyone helped me with my order. I didn't know his name or remember what he was wearing so I naturally wanted to say "the black gentleman helped me" but then I got this weird notion in my head that it was offensive to refer to him by race. I couldn't think of any other descriptors though. I started to hesitate, then surreptitiously whispered "the black guy." The lady at the counter looked at me really weird, probably thinking I was a total racist cause I felt so uncomfortable saying the word "black" when I was so uncomfortable precisely because I was worried I'd be perceived as racist. Silly
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    #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by JessFR View Post
    British? OK yeah I know that's not very specific. OK let's go an English accent. Still lots of room to narrow down but if it's right that's still not bad.

    Sorry babe, im from Texas. I have lived in the UK for 18 years though so I've got an odd accent.
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    #41
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    Interesting. Now I'm curious what your speaking voice sounds like. And how old you are. I'm in a similar position, only swap Britain with Australia and Texas with Florida, and I'm not old enough for it to be 18 years yet. I don't think my accent has changed too much though. But different people seem to be susceptible to adopting accents to different degrees at different ages.

    I still maintain my points valid though. It's not just different words, different cultures think in different ways. And while Britain Australia and the US are relatively similar cultures, they do have subtle differences.

    And depending on your current age, 18 years could be pretty significant. Especially if you're much younger than about 40-45.
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    #42
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    Ooh another hybrid!

    I'd love to hear your accent. Also, I live in Scotland so, not your typical British ( English) type accent.

    We'll not discuss age but i only hit out with a few Scottish sounding words though I use many colloquial phrases and terms.
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    #43
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    While it's hard to tell your own accent, mines definitely not even close to Australian (and I couldn't fake it to save my life). Australians hear it immediately as North American. I've gotten mixed responses from Americans and for some it could be confirmation bias, but most say they either can't hear an accent or that they can but only just.

    While you can't hear your own accent, how you hear others tends to reflect your own. So for example, I don't really "hear" most neutral American accents, but I hear Australian accents very noticably unless it's someone I speak to all the time.

    What about you? Do you immediately perceive British accents but not some American ones or vice versa?
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