Bluelight

Thread: Do anti-psychotics prevent tripping?

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. Collapse Details
    Do anti-psychotics prevent tripping? 
    #1
    All I want to know
    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
     
    #2
    Bluelighter Venrak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    3,554
    Yes.
    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
     
    #3
    Thank you kind sir,
    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
     
    #4
    The short answer is indeed a resounding yes however upon further investigation it depends on the trip inducing agent and the anti psychotic in question. Generally speaking anti psychs don't actually stop the trip but instead change its characteristics. Usually the experience will be somewhat dulled and often offer a more fatigued, stoned and less psychedelic adventure. In addition the effects may be shorter and in some cases the hangover or afterglow will be intensified.

    If you have a particular agent and antipsychotic in mind let me know and I will expand further.

    Cheers
    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
     
    #5
    Moderator
    Psychedelic Drugs
    Wiki
    Solipsis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    10,850
    Serotonergic antagonists will prevent or stop a trip the most.
    I think atypical antipsychotics like dopaminergic antagonists will prevent or stop a trip less but considering a 'wholesome' effect it will probably still be mitigated.

    So as a simple answer: yes, because of the general neuroleptic effect. But some of them are more selective to 'reverse' or 'block' the actual psychedelic effect (mediated by 5-HT2A) and others work more by carpet bombing your total awareness.
    Please start at the Beginners FAQ - Read the PD Rules and BLUA - Use the Psychedelic Index and/or the advanced search engine
    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
     
    #6
    Moderator
    The Lounge
    Roger&Me's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    bikey boys HQ
    Posts
    19,812

    From
    The Pharmacology of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide: A Review
    by Torsten Passie, John H. Halpern, Dirk O. Stichtenoth, Hinderk M. Emrich & Annelie Hintzen
    CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics 14 (2008 ) 295–314


    This chart indicates that chlorpromazine (CPZ) will reduce the effects of LSD, and CPZ is a good indicator of how other phenothiazines might interact with LSD. However, I have heard that this effect does not extend to the atypical antipsychotics such a quetiapine (seroquel) -- which would most likely be designated as <--> if it were included in the chart above.

    As an aside, I found it interesting that methamphetamine (MA) reduces the effects of LSD while amphetamine and methylphenidate increase the effects. This must be due to MA's significant 5-HT releasing effects, because 5-HT is a better agonist at 5-HT2A than LSD is.
    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
     
    #7
    my girlfriend has to take abilify/aripiprazol since january because of her mental condition. about a month ago we tried a low dose of acid together (100mcg), she did not feel any altered at all, while I was at a constant ++/+++
    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
     
    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger&Me View Post
    This chart indicates that chlorpromazine (CPZ) will reduce the effects of LSD, and CPZ is a good indicator of how other phenothiazines might interact with LSD. However, I have heard that this effect does not extend to the atypical antipsychotics such a quetiapine (seroquel) -- which would most likely be designated as <--> if it were included in the chart above.

    As an aside, I found it interesting that methamphetamine (MA) reduces the effects of LSD while amphetamine and methylphenidate increase the effects. This must be due to MA's significant 5-HT releasing effects, because 5-HT is a better agonist at 5-HT2A than LSD is.
    Chlorpromazine has nanomolar 2A affinity, quetiapine is a couple of hundred nM. Risperidone, olanzapine (zyprexa), clozapine, aripiprazole have high affinity and should work fairly well to block the effects of psychedelics. Haloperidol has reasonable affinity (a bit more than quetiapine) and sulpiride/amisulpiride very low affinity. Really makes me wonder how some of these were classified as typical/atypical.

    Yeah the meth bit is interesting, but I thought it didn't cause that much serotonin release. And it looks like LSD binds with slightly higher affinity than 5-HT, though they are similar. I'm guessing it's some quirk with that study.
    Reply With Quote
     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •