Bluelight

Thread: A Guide and FAQ: What to do when someone Overdoses (work in progress)

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 99
  1. Collapse Details
    A Guide and FAQ: What to do when someone Overdoses (work in progress) 
    #1
    There has been a lot of disagreement and confusion on what to do when someone overdoses. Here is the complete thread dealing with what to do when someone overdoses, how to protect yourself legally, and what can you expect.

    I shall also address common misconceptions, FAQ, and the truth of what can happen.

    What to do when someone overdoses


    1. Call 911 or your local emergency hotline to get an ambulance over as soon as you notice
    the person has overdosed. Do not attempt to drive them to the hospital yourself.

    2. Report two things:

    A) The person is unresponsive and is clearly dying.
    B) A clear and obvious public location that is easy to locate, relatively safe, and nearby.
    This can be your front porch if need be, but you need to make the victim easily recognizable from the
    street.

    3. Take the person who overdosed and bring them to the reported location.
    It is not necessary for you to stay with the person if you feel the location
    is safe enough and you are paranoid. You may want to write "DRUGS", "COCAINE", "HEROIN", etc,
    on their shirt, forehead, arm, or on like a piece of large paper you stick on them.

    Plain and simple, that is all you do. Time is of the essence, and every second you waste can result in a death. You must do as above. These steps are not outlined to be callous, but the best possible way to get the person the medical attention they need as soon as possible. The only thing that matters is time.

    These rules do not change in different country. You face no legal risk or consequence following these steps, and these are absolutely the best things you can do for the overdose victim. Remember, it is not about you, it is simply about getting the EMT there as quick as possible. They will know what is going on and what to do immediately, do not try to play doctor if you are not trained.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~NEW POST ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Why are we doing as outlined? It seems callous, mean, strange, etc...

    We call 911 first thing. As soon as you know the person overdosed, you must call 911. Do not attempt to shoot them up with Narcan unless you have proper medical experience doing so and are personally qualified, and do not try to shoot them with naltrexone. While these methods may work, are you really going to bet the person's life that you can do this correctly, the first time you ever try to, under such pressure you are not familiar with? No, it would be stupid. Call 911.

    Do not attempt CPR either unless you have taken official classes learning how to do so. Even when done correctly, CPR often results in broken ribs and permanent damage. I cannot stress enough that you should not attempt CPR at all unless you are a medical professional, you can kill someone if you do it wrong, such as by puncturing a lung or artery. Do not mess with the body at all, just get it out in the open for the EMT to pick up easily.

    We all have problems, and there is no reason to be ashamed to admit that if someone overdoses on their own drug use and their own fault, that you would rather they die than ruin your life with possible drug charges. This is perfectly normal. However, saving a life and looking out for Numero Uno are not independent of each other. You can make sure you avoid legal repercussion, and save a life.

    Knowing this, there is no excuse for why you didn't call 911 when someone overdoses. If you are in a house of junkies, explain clearly to them that you intend to take the individual somewhere else, and that they face no risk of legal trouble since you are going to report it as a heart attack and leaving them somewhere else. The last thing you need is a junky cutting the phone line to prevent you from calling help.

    How do I know it's an overdose?

    - Lips, tongue, nail beds, earlobes, or skin are blue or purple
    - Breathing is less than once every five seconds or stopped altogether
    - Pulse is slow or there is none at all
    - They start to seize, and lose control of motor functions.
    - A person who has O.D.'d may be able to breathe and to look at you but not talk
    - They may be unconscious, and are unresponsive!

    ~~~~~~~~~~~ NEWPOST~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    What to say on the phone

    Why are we reporting it as an unresponsive person and not a drug overdose?

    Simple - Unresponsive person and drug overdose both get the same priority - Number 1 (or "Code Blue"). So you are not going to cause someone else to die because the ambulance went to you first instead of another call (although nothing is more pressing than a drug overdose). Also, while as much as you may think America is overzealous in anti-drug law, we are not going to let someone die. EMT respond just as quickly.

    If this is the case, so why are we calling it an unresponsive subject? Well, given that they are both treated exactly the same in terms of response, it is quite simply for legal protection. The person who overdosed may not be too happy to wake up with a court summons when he comes to.

    It is in fact true, that in many areas police are actually required to appear if a drug overdose is called in, and distribute charges to any drugs or paraphernalia found, including those of the person who made the call and the victim. In some areas, you can even receive a possession charge simply by being under the influence, which is relatively new legislation reasoning that you must have at one point possessed the drug, proof of which is your dirty system. Even admission of drug use at one point can be enough evidence to warrant a possession charge in some states.

    By calling in a heart attack, you effectively leave the police out of the situation, and get the medical attention all the same. Many people have received felony charges simply from being an overdose victim or the conscientious caller. Also, you do not risk any charges simply because you called in "unresponsive person" instead of drug overdose. The truth of the matter is that the person is indeed unresponsive.

    Please, do not be a fucking retard and say "heroin overdose" simply because you love the person and want to do what's right. I understand the heat of the moment and you may say drug overdose, but unresponsive subject gets the same treatment, is technically true, and the EMT are trained to know what is going on immediately. When it is reported as such, the EMT are preparing for possible drug overdose on the way over.

    This has been researched by contacting multiple EMT offices, by the way.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ NEW POST~~~~~~~~~~~
    Why are we moving the victim?

    So why are we reporting the location of somewhere else, and not just calling the ambulance to where I am now? Isn't this just being an asshole and trying to save my own ass at risk of the victim?

    No. While the ambulance is fast, it still takes them at least a minute or two to get there. This is the time spent taking the victim to the location reported.

    Where am I taking them somewhere else, and why?

    You are taking them to a highly visible, well known location. Preferably, on the main road of transit to get to your place from the hospital, or at least, as close as you can get in reasonable time. A street corner, a gas station, a traffic light intersection, notable land marks, are all considerable places to take the victim.

    Also remember that an unconscious body is extremely heavy! Call in a realistic location, and if you do not think you could get far, then call in close by. Even the front porch, the point is you need to get the body outside so the EMT can do their job quickly. A stretcher is a pain in the ass to get through a door or up stairs.

    This is because many times, ambulances do get lost. You are trying to help the ambulance reach the victim quicker this way. If you report an address, this may cause the ambulance to take a wrong turn, have to delay their arrival by checking street signs, et cetera. You want to take the victim somewhere easy for the ambulance to locate. The idea is that the ambulance is driving down main street to you and can pick you up without stopping.

    Remember, the main cause of traffic delay (not with ambulances, just in general and commuting) is having to stop and make turns. You are trying to help the ambulance effectively make a straight line from the hospital to the victim. Many neighborhoods are just plain confusing as well, and even GPS can't change the fact that it is impossible to see street addresses at night even when they are lit up and the fact so many neighborhoods are not conventional in how they are addressed.

    This is not done to protect you or save your ass. This it to make sure the ambulance gets to the victim as soon as possible. It is well known that ambulances have been lost in transit. Just think of how many times you've gotten lost driving.

    If you cannot, for whatever reason, take them all the way to the street corner or on the main road, you can leave them on the front porch, on the sidewalk, et cetera. The main point is so the EMT will see the victim from the street immediately, and to be able to spend less time making many turns navigating around the area. We want the EMT to the victim as soon as possible, this has nothing to do with saving your ass.

    Why am I dumping the body? You stated I didn't have to stay there, isn't this an asshole thing to do?

    Preferably you took the body somewhere safe and well lit. If there is no such place, and you think that you couldn't even leave the body for a minute without fear of him being molested, perhaps calling in your immediate location is better.

    You do not have to stay with the individual, the EMT will take care of them and realize what is going on as soon as possible. You can scribble "HEROIN" or "DRUG OVERDOSE" or "COCAINE", et cetera, with pen on their shirt or easily on their body, so EMT can get an idea of what is going on. If you choose to stay with the body, it may be a good idea to mention you suspect drug use.

    However, if you are paranoid, you can leave the scene, or watch from afar. This guide is not here to make moral arguments. This article is purely for harm reduction. The main focus is to make sure someone gets the medical attention they need as soon as possible, not our own shortcomings as humans in life.

    Obviously, the most caring thing you can do is stay with the individual, and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. This guide is posted with the notion in mind that many of those involved are doing something illegal, and may be paranoid. The point of this guide is to get those who would normally not call 911 for fear of legal trouble, to calling 911 and realizing you can protect yourself. If you wish to stay with the person who overdosed, that is great. It still is important, however, that you move the body to an easy, well known location so the EMT can get there quicker without the possibility of them getting lost.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~NEW POST ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Common Myths, Misconceptions, and FAQ

    I really care about this person, I could not do this I would go crazy!

    If you really care for the person, you can stay with them the whole time. It is still important that you move the body to a location the EMT can get to easily, like an intersection on the main road or by a gas station. You still do everything as outlined above. It is a harrowing experience, but you just need to sit tight, remain calm, and focus on getting the EMT there as soon as possible. Don't try to fix them yourself!

    This guide was written with the person who would normally run away and not call for help because of fear of trouble, in mind, however, you still do the same things as you would if you were a conscientious person. You do not need to bring legal trouble around and can still get the same medical attention.

    I'm a fast driver! I'm going to drive to the hospital

    Do not do this! Even if you are an overly concerned person, do not make this fatal mistake! The time it takes for you to load the body and drive to the hospital is much longer than it would take for the EMT to get to you! The steps outlined above are not a guide to "how to protect you ass" but "how to get the EMT there as quick as possible". By driving to the hospital you are simply being egotistical and conceited - do not do this, this is not the time to feed your ego. You may also kill someone by driving recklessly. The amount of pressure given the situation, I seriously doubt anyone in the world could drive safely.

    What if I have Narcan, Suboxone, Naltrexone, etc?

    Unless you are qualified and experienced, you should not rely on these. This is someone's life we are talking about, and if you fail you will be responsible for their death. Are you willing to bet you know exactly what you are doing and can handle the pressure? Are you willing to bet their life and the possibility of knowing you killed someone?

    I hope not. Call 911 immediately. If you feel you know what you are doing, you can do this while you wait for the ambulance. If successful, you may be able to leave the scene before they arrive and call saying false alarm. If not, well, the EMT can make sure it's done right.

    Narcan is usually administered intravenously (intramuscularly if IV is unavailable, in the thigh or shoulder) with a dose of around .4-2mg, and re-administered every 30 minutes. Narcan is an opiate antagonist, meaning it pulls the opiate off the receptors. It does not metabolize the opiate, meaning that the drug is still in their system at dangerous levels. It is quite possible that the victim can be injected with narcan, snap out of an overdose, only to die 30 minutes later when it wears off. The victim needs supervision.

    If all you have is Naltrexone pills, you need to use only a minute amount. Remember, Naltrexone is usually given in 50mg pills, so know what the strength is first. You can attempt to make 1/25th of this, which is less than a quarter of the pill, mix it with water, and filter it with a cotton or micron filter, preferably at least twice or three times. You can shoot this as you would Narcan - an opiate overdose is more pressing than the possibility of an abscess. To divy it into a 25th, cut the pill in half, mix it with 2 ml (or CC) of water, then inject 20 units of the solution. Given the complication of this process and the essence of time, you must call 911 first and then can do this as you wait.

    Do not use Suboxone, or administer Suboxone in any way! While there is Naloxone in it, the main ingredient in Narcan and Naltrexone, the binding affinity of buprenorphine, the main opioid in it, is extremely high, so high that it rivals the Naloxone. By administering Suboxone to an overdose victim you may very possibly be effectively increasing the amount of opiates in their system. In plain English, don't use Suboxone, it won't work, and will make the EMT's job harder.

    Also note that while the common dosage is around 2mg for Naltrexone HCl, it can vary greatly depending on how strongly the opiate in question binds to receptors, therefore varying the effectiveness of Narcan and Naltrexone HCl, and quite simply that certain individuals have differing chemistry and under different doses; it is not uncommon that doses higher than 10 mg are needed. Always call 911 first, than you can attempt to help them yourself. Do not gamble that you will do it correctly, because if you fail then the death is your fault.

    Won't a cold shower/cold ice/ice in the groin/etc... work?

    No, they will not. Often a major problem with stimulant and cocaine overdose is that the person suffers life threatening hyperthermia, or that their body overheats. If someone is sick, and not overdosing, ice/cold water may help. But if they are in a life threatening situation, or even seizing or unconscious, ice/cold will not do enough to save the person.

    You can put ice or water on them while you wait for 911, but they won't save the individual. All this may do is lessen the extent of brain damage once they come to. Call 911 first, then you can try out the water.

    Also, you may end up drowning the individual or putting them into shock.

    What about shocking the individual to wake up, like punching them, sticking my finger down their throat, kicking them, ice water in the groin, or hot water?

    Do not do this, you may cause physical damage to their body, and it won't help to bring them back.

    Many people try to "slap" or use cold/hot water to bring a person back. If they have effectively overdosed, this will not help as their central nervous system is unresponsive and essentially turned off. They will feel nothing.

    What if I give them some Xanax/Pills or coffee or water etc...

    Do not put stuff in their mouth or nose, they may drown on it or choke. It won't do anything to help them either.

    Can I shoot them up with Milk/Orange Juice/Salt Water, etc...?

    No, this is an old junky's tale.

    Shooting up an individual with anything organic or organic based is extremely dangerous, and very likely can result is anaphylactic shock - an extreme allergic reaction where antibodies will attack in a self-damaging manner, and can result in death. This is an attack on foreign proteins, which are comparable to bacteria and the like, which your immune system will attack viciously.

    Can I balance out their system, by shooting a heroin victim with coke, or a coke victim with heroin?

    No, it doesn't work like that. The flood of cocaine/stimulants can actually paralyze your heart tissue which may cause an overdose, which won't change if you inject heroin. If you inject coke, this will do nothing to remove the heroin from their receptors and cause your CNS to start working.

    The human body isn't some sort of balance scale. This does not work at all, and only further serves to complicate things and lead to death. In many cases, the mix of heroin and cocaine can actually complement each other to make death more likely. This is very stupid, elementary logic, don't do it...


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~NEW POST~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Finishing Words

    Too many times people refuse to call 911 to avoid legal repercussion - there's nothing wrong with wanting to avoid the law. However, little do people know that you can address an overdose victim without the possibility of getting yourself in trouble.

    Also, too many times people are the opposite - they feel they must do everything they can to save the person, and by doing so actually cause their death. Do not attempt to drive the person to the hospital! The ambulance can get their and back 5 times before you can get there because they can speed through traffic and in some places, have all lights turned green for them. This can also prevent you from facing legal trouble or putting lives in risk due to wreckless driving.

    Don't kill someone driving someone to the hospital. Don't have the overdose victim die while you fumble around driving to the hospital yourself or doing something stupid. Do not be so egotistical and conceited.

    Call 911 first thing. Move the body somewhere easy for the ambulance to pick them up. Report it as a heart attack to avoid the law and get the same attention.

    Do not attempt to cure them without help on their way, do not attempt to drive the victim to the hospital yourself!


    These steps are designed to get the help there as fast as possible. It is only by consequence they keep you safe from legal trouble. Given this, there should be no reason a house full of junkies will refuse to serve an overdose victim the right attention. If you are concerned, you can stay with the individual the whole time. Just do not attempt to drive them yourself, do not attempt to cure them without calling 911 first, and always make sure to move the individual somewhere the EMT can get to easily.

    Take note that being in the situation, and reading it about it are completely different. I know when someone overdosed on me, it was the scariest moment in my life. Sometimes you may not remember all these steps, or you'll just freak out. That's normal, just make sure to get the help they need.

    Be safe.

    Thanks to so many in the Other Drugs Community for contributing, and I especially want to thank sixpartseven for so much help, especially in making this guide come true.
    Last edited by TheodoreRoosevelt; 26-03-2008 at 07:39.
     

  2. Collapse Details
     
    #2
    very informative and I'm glad I read it (I don't even know anyone or have any friends that IV).

    Anyways, my drug counselor keeps telling us how when you OD on heroin they give you an upper to keep you from dying. I just keep wanting to tell her how full of shit she is.
     

  3. Collapse Details
     
    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by TheodoreRoosevelt
    Narcan is usually administered Intramuscularly, such as in the shoulder or in the thigh, with a dose of around 10-15mg
    Dose is 0.4-2.0mg (which is 1-5mL, I believe its always 0.4mg/mL). I don't know quickly more is given if thats not enough, but a cumulative dose of 10-15mg would be monstrous, nevermind giving that all at once. But yeah, its 0.4-2.0mg.
     

  4. Collapse Details
     
    #4
    Eh, don't tell your drug counselor she's full of shit until AFTER your out of class and off papers. Don't think she won't keep you in class, or tell your PO you gave her a dirty comment.

    Thanks! I appreciate the feedback.

    It's one thing to read about, and quite another to experience. You resort to animal instinct, you panic, you think thoughts you absolutely have no clue you'd think about. I remember when I had an overdose victim, I thought completely different from "I need to get help immediately!" and just thought "fuck whyd he have to overdose, man what do I do with the corpse".

    One of the scariest moments of my life. It's completely different to be in the situation than read it. I was sticking my fingers down his throat, punching him, I was an animal...

    Perhaps I should address this in the guide...

    Thanks johanneschimpo.
     

  5. Collapse Details
     
    #5
    for sure. is it every 45 min? did you just locate that info? i'm sure it wouldnt be hard to find. (you accidentally typed .04 instead of 0.4)
     

  6. Collapse Details
     
    #6
    Bluelighter NikkiNumberNine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    504
    This is excellent info, thank you for posting it.
     

  7. Collapse Details
     
    #7
    I'll search more sources, I thought I heard 15 and so just typed those numbers in as temporary. 45 I read on a source, I've been searching additional sources.

    If anyone has experience with EMT, works as an EMT, works with them, or has personal experience being part of a emergency medical team, and could contribute on what the EMT does with an opiate overdose victim, that'd be greatly appreciated. What I've wrote was findings online, and would appreciate actual input instead.

    I'll see if I can contact my local EMT about what they do when someone overdoses and how they administer narcan.
    Last edited by TheodoreRoosevelt; 21-03-2008 at 08:50.
     

  8. Collapse Details
     
    #8
    Bluelighter Mind-Melt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    New England.. Ask!
    Posts
    805
    excellent post Teddy... thank you for the time you put into this.

    my passed friend may be alive today if a certain someone read this.
     

  9. Collapse Details
     
    #9
    Ex-Bluelighter center's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    North America
    Posts
    3,853
    Teddy is the man. This needs to be a sticky.
     

  10. Collapse Details
     
    #10
    Bluelighter Dead_Flowers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Freaker... right by the speaker
    Posts
    610
    Quote Originally Posted by TheodoreRoosevelt
    [B]
    3. Take the person who overdosed and bring them to the reported location.
    It is not necessary for you to stay with the person. You may want to write
    "DRUGS", "COCAINE", "HEROIN", etc, on their shirt, forehead, arm, or on like
    a piece of large paper you stick on them.
    I don't know if it is wise to dump a dying person at some random, public location and split. Think of how much trouble one could be in if such an act was seen and reported...

    If you're trying to keep yourself from legal trouble, it might be best to stay with the person and feign ignorance.
     

  11. Collapse Details
     
    #11
    Bluelighter jykkE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    961
    How to Recognize an O.D.
    - Lips, tongue, nail beds, earlobes, or skin are blue or purple
    - Breathing is less than once every five seconds or stopped altogether
    - Pulse is slow or there is none at all
    - They are puking, shaking, having a seizure
    - A person who has O.D.'d may be able to breathe and to look at you but not talk
    - They may be unconscious
    - They be sweating a ton

    With a serious O.D. you have about 4 MINUTES from the time your lips turn blue to coma. Act now! Don't wait for them ot come around!

    Common Causes of O.D.'s
    - Mixing drugs is the most common way to O.D.
    - Heroin + downer pills + alcohol slow you down and suppress your respiratory functions (Breathing)

    Try not to mix drugs
    Stimulants, like crack/meth/coke, speed you up and increase your risk of heart attacks and seizures.

    Doing too much at once can cause you to O.D.
    Keep track of how much you've taken. Doing too much in a short period of time causes the drugs to build up in your system - even if you don't still feel high. Be especially careful with time release pills like OXYCONTIN - and sedatives like Valium and alcohol.

    Let the drugs work before you do more
    Tolerance: liver or kidney damage, time away from using like jail or kicking, weight loss, having a cold or flu, using other drugs for awhile - all affect your body's ability to cope with the drug in your system.

    Use less when you've been sick or away from drugs - This is safer because the drug doesn't rush to your brain as fast as when you shoot up.

    Purer Drugs / Dangerous Cuts (cheaper downers)
    You never really know for sure what you are getting on the streets. Does it taste, smell, look okay? Snort a bit first or do a tester shot to check the strength. Purity of street drugs can change day to day - dealer to dealer. If you run across really strong dope, Tell your friends!!!


    What NOT to Do If Someone O.D.'s
    - Do not leave them alone - If you have to run and get help, put them in the recovery position.
    - Don't put ice down their pants.
    - Don't throw them in a freezing bath - This could cause them to go into shock or drown. A wet rag around their neck or a little water poured down their back and chest is better.
    - Don't do the chest part of CPR if you don't know how - Only do mouth to mouth.
    - Don't inject the person with salt, water, milk, coke, or speed - This doesn't work.
    - Don't give them coffee, alcohol, or other liquids - It won't wake them up and they could choke on their puke and be unable to breathe.
    - DON'T PANIC - It's normal to be afraid, but if you are freaking out you can't think and help the person. Breathe deep and do what you know how to do. Keep trying. You can do it!
    DON'T BE AFRAID TO CALL 911 - Tell them someone has stopped breathing..

     

  12. Collapse Details
     
    #12
    Bluelighter GenericMind's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    38,121
    Good thread.
     

  13. Collapse Details
     
    #13
    Bluelighter chinacat311's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    giant spoon.
    Posts
    1,058
    i still dont know about the whole heart attack thing. most ODs i have been a privy to the cops did not arrest anyone or place charges.

    if you tell the paramedics its a heart attack, it will just take them longer to figure out whats up and administer that narcan, which could cost a dying person precious seconds.

    at the very least (if you are going to call in a heart attack) its usually a good idea to leave a note with the person such as "i have overdosed on X and Y." i sometimes carry such a thing in my wallet so they know for sure what im on if i ever fall out in public or some shit.

    also, i know this was addressed in the other thread, but depending on the condition of the person, you might not want to just leave them on the street waiting for an ambulance. it is sometimes necessary to stay with them, monitor their breathing, recovery position, and all that. leaving too soon could be costly.
    Last edited by chinacat311; 21-03-2008 at 19:16.
     

  14. Collapse Details
     
    #14
    Bluelight Crew JV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    welcome to the midwest
    Posts
    7,370
    great post teddy. thanks for putting the time and effort in this. it will probably save someones life.
     

  15. Collapse Details
     
    #15
    Bluelight Crew sixpartseven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Detroit
    Posts
    11,303
    Quote Originally Posted by chinacat311
    i still dont know about the whole heart attack thing. most ODs i have been a privy to the cops did not arrest anyone or place charges.

    if you tell the paramedics its a heart attack, it will just take them longer to figure out whats up and administer that narcan, which could cost a dying person precious seconds.

    at the very least (if you are going to call in a heart attack) its usually a good idea to leave a note with the person such as "i have overdosed on X and Y." i sometimes carry such a thing in my wallet so they know for sure what im on if i ever fall out in public or some shit.

    also, i know this was addressed in the other thread, but depending on the condition of the person, you might not want to just leave them on the street waiting for an ambulance. it is sometimes necessary to stay with them, monitor their breathing, recovery position, and all that. leaving too soon could be costly.

    Didnt he say something like that? if not, thats a great idea. I wouldnt want to leave it so that they have to figure it out on their own.
     

  16. Collapse Details
     
    #16
    ^ He did. He said write the drug(s) on their shirt, arm, or a piece of paper with them.
    That is absolutely necessary, I know TR wouldn't miss that point.
     

  17. Collapse Details
     
    #17
    Bluelighter brianxymox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Jet City baby!
    Posts
    150
    What everybody else said, excellent and informative post that should mos def be sticky if it isn't already.
     

  18. Collapse Details
     
    #18
    if you tell the paramedics its a heart attack, it will just take them longer to figure out whats up and administer that narcan, which could cost a dying person precious seconds.
    I pointed out what to do if you do this. The EMT should recognize what's going on fairly quickly though.

    I don't know if it is wise to dump a dying person at some random, public location and split. Think of how much trouble one could be in if such an act was seen and reported...
    Yes, but I think many people would be too paranoid to do that in some cases. I stated that if you dump the body somewhere, make sure that the place is somewhere he/she will remain unmolested, and if you don't think its safe enough, perhaps maybe you should just call in your immediate location instead.

    The focus of the thread is to make sure people do it. I think it's safe to assume that many people out there would rather let the person die than stick around and waste their time with an EMT for 5 minutes. Some people are just too callous perhaps, and whatever, that's fine, this thread is not about chastizing those choose that. It's usually a grace that you actually called 911 at all.

    I tried to call my local EMT office today but they were all out on calls. I'm going to try to call them again tommorow.

    Thanks jykkE for the info, I'll be sure to add some of that.

    Thanks to so many for the props, I appreciate it.

    edit: Added jykkE's info to the FAQ section and first subsection. Addressed about leaving the body somewhere in main section. Added more to conclusion. Now if I can just get a hold of an EMT...
    Last edited by TheodoreRoosevelt; 22-03-2008 at 04:29.
     

  19. Collapse Details
     
    #19
    Bluelight Crew sixpartseven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Detroit
    Posts
    11,303
    Quote Originally Posted by brianxymox
    What everybody else said, excellent and informative post that should mos def be sticky if it isn't already.
    Read the red note at the bottom. Will be placed in the directory after a week or two of comments and corrections.
     

  20. Collapse Details
     
    #20
    Bluelight Crew sixpartseven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Detroit
    Posts
    11,303
    Bumping. Another few days for you all to make comments or corrections before it gets finalized and thrown in the Directory.
     

  21. Collapse Details
     
    #21
    Bluelighter rave23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Canada / Germany
    Posts
    1,622
    Don't panic
    that's good advice. You help everybody that is involved by doing so. An OD is frightening, but it does not have to be lethal if you react promptly, stay calm, and follow these simple steps.
     

  22. Collapse Details
     
    #22
    Yea, I dunno man. I tried to post something about how so very real the experience is, how completely shocking it is. I mean I panicked when it happened to me, I was an animal, punching the guy and everything. I tried driving him to the hospital, and then he came to like 15 minutes later.

    I wonder if someone read this, would they be able to remember the stuff they read here? I mean seriously, would you be able to think "Okay, I call 911 first, then i move them to a good location, etc etc"? Or you think they'd just flip ape shit and forgot all this? I hope they can remember some of these tips...

    At least call 911 first, then you can figure everything out I guess.

    I wanted to try and avoid making it a personal account there, so I dunno.

    Gonna try to contact my local EMT today. I think that's really the last thing this needs, unless anyone else has any suggestions.
     

  23. Collapse Details
     
    #23
    Ex-Bluelighter center's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    North America
    Posts
    3,853
    I overdosed on oxycodone and my brother sounded like it was hiccuping in my sleep, who told my mother--she questioned it greatly and found me in my room, dying with pale skin and purple lips (so not my best color), so I was rushed to the ICU. Here I am, vowing never to touch a benzo again. It's been a week and a half.

    I just have never been through something so frightening, that I wasn't conscious for. It's all about being in a dark hospital setting once you regain consciousness--

    "Do you know where you are?"
    "Do you know what happened to you?"
    "What's the day of the week?"
     

  24. Collapse Details
     
    #24
    Bluelight Crew sixpartseven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Detroit
    Posts
    11,303
    Quote Originally Posted by TheodoreRoosevelt
    Yea, I dunno man. I tried to post something about how so very real the experience is, how completely shocking it is. I mean I panicked when it happened to me, I was an animal, punching the guy and everything. I tried driving him to the hospital, and then he came to like 15 minutes later.
    It is. Its so scary. Im sure youve all seen the story posted around here by me and my girlfriend about me reviving her from an OD in the backseat of the car. In that situation, I wouldnt have followed any of this advice simply because shes my girlfriend, but if it were one of my idiot friends that were driving, I would definitely follow this.

    Good question though. Would I remember it? I think I specifically would because I was involved in the process of making this with you (sort of) but would the average poster in OD? I hope so.
     

  25. Collapse Details
     
    #25
    Why wouldn't you follow this if she's your girlfriend?

    Perhaps I made this sound too impersonal, and should outline more about steps to do if you feel concerned (ie stay with the body, etc)?

    No I have no clue about your story, I'll do a search. I've always considered posting a thread about drug overdose accounts, but I always decided against it because that shit is too personal. I don't know how many of us would like to relive those moments, you know.
     

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •