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Thread: NEWS: Herald Sun - 05/06/07 'Boy expelled over ecstasy deal'

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    NEWS: Herald Sun - 05/06/07 'Boy expelled over ecstasy deal' 
    #1
    Bluelight Crew hoptis's Avatar
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    Boy expelled over ecstasy deal
    Jane Metlikovec and Shannon McRae
    June 05, 2007 09:12am

    INTERNET EXCLUSIVE: A SCOTCH College student has been expelled for selling ecstasy at school.

    The year-12 boy was expelled from the elite Hawthorn college last week.

    The student had sold two ecstasy pills to a year-nine boy who took them during school and fell into a drug haze.

    Fellow year-12 students today confirmed the campus drug pushing.

    They told the Herald Sun Online the boy had done a stupid thing.

    "He is an idiot, he shouldn’t have done it," a boy said.

    But the boys said the expelled student was not fully to blame for the controversy.

    "The school shouldn’t be pushing this under the carpet," one said.

    "All they care about is their own reputation."

    Scotch College refused to answer repeated calls from the Herald Sun Online yesterday.

    It is believed the school will release a statement later today.
    Herald Sun
     

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    #2
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    School drug boy expelled
    Jane Metlikovec
    June 06, 2007 12:00am

    POLICE have demanded private schools be forced to report drug deals after Scotch College failed to tell them it had expelled a young ecstasy pusher last week.

    Deputy Commissioner Simon Overland has called for private schools to be pulled into line with state schools, which are required by government protocol to tell police of drug-related incidents.

    "I think it's a difficult issue for schools to deal with, drug use in schools," Mr Overland said.

    "But if there's criminal behaviour involved, they really do need to involve the police and the earlier they do that, the better."

    But the Bracks Government said yesterday it would not introduce laws demanding mandatory reporting across the board.

    Elite schools have come under intense scrutiny this year for hiding on-campus drug scandals.

    Xavier College came under fire in April for failing to tell police it had expelled a year 11 student for selling marijuana in the school yard in February.

    Mr Overland said police were determined to ensure private school students faced the same consequences as state school students.

    A Scotch College year 12 student was expelled last week after he allegedly sold two ecstasy pills to a year 9 boy, who took them at school and fell into a drug haze.

    Police received no reports from the school, and it did not return police calls yesterday afternoon.

    Year 12 students outside Scotch College said the year 9 student had been threatened with expulsion if he publicly named the boy who sold him the drugs.

    The senior students said the year 9 boy, who is believed to be back at school, was stupid for taking them.

    "He is an idiot. He shouldn't have done it," one said.

    A friend of the expelled student said he was upset at the way the school had handled the matter.

    "You can 'ask' students to leave but does that fix the problem at the school or with the accused student?" he said.

    "There is no way you can eliminate drugs in school, so wouldn't the next step be to approach the students about the issue and implement education strategies about the risks involved with drug use?

    "The school needs to take action, whether it may tarnish its reputation or not."

    Scotch College management, who had refused to answer calls from the Herald Sun for two days, yesterday morning promised to release a media statement but had not by evening.

    Education Minister John Lenders said in Parliament yesterday the State Government would not pass laws to dictate how non-government schools dealt with drug use among students.

    "This Government sees as totally unacceptable illegal drugs use in schools . . . and we will work with the non-government schools for policies and best practices which will stamp them out," Mr Lenders said.

    But Opposition education spokesman Philip Davis said that was not good enough.

    "Schools must have an obligation to report, as it's clear otherwise they won't because they don't want to damage their reputations," Mr Davis said.

    Another private school yesterday admitted a student had been expelled and another suspended over a sex scandal.

    Overnewton College principal Jim Laussen said a year 10 boy had been expelled from the Keilor school for filming a female student as she performed sexual acts on him in the school toilets last week.

    The female student has been suspended, and the school helped the boy's family find him a place at another school, Mr Laussen said.
    Herald Sun
     

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    #3
    Bluelight Crew hoptis's Avatar
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    Failing students
    Editorial

    June 06, 2007 12:00am

    SCOTCH College is Victoria's oldest school and one of its most exclusive.

    Parents pay almost $20,000 to put a child through year 12 there, and would expect a lot for their money.

    In its handling of a drug sale in the schoolyard, however, the school has short-changed parents and students.

    Drugs do not respect social barriers and are as much a problem behind ivy-covered walls as ones decked in graffiti.

    That a student of affluent parents would be involved with drugs is no surprise.

    What is worrying, however, is the way Scotch dealt in-house with ecstasy dealing, even after a student fell ill from the drug.

    The matter is far too serious for that.

    Police should not have had to find out about this ecstasy deal at Scotch from the Herald Sun. They should not have had to struggle then to contact school authorities.

    Of course Scotch College is not the only private school with drug issues, or the only one to try to keep a lid on it.

    It is compulsory for government schools to alert police to student drug-dealing. Private schools can decide for themselves - but it is a mistake for them to think every case can be dealt with behind closed doors.

    The world has radically changed from the one in which their senior staff grew up.

    Students have never been more cashed up, or had more technology to allow unwholesome networks to secretly thrive.

    Mobile phones and computers expedite everything from drug dealing to fight clubs.

    Tradition does not always prepare a school to deal with that.

    Dealing ecstasy is a serious crime that demands a proper police investigation, uncomfortable as that might be to a school.

    Student welfare must come first. Keeping dirty linen hidden only leaves schools open to suspicion they are more worried about their reputation than drugs.
    Herald Sun
     

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    #4
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    "There is no way you can eliminate drugs in school, so wouldn't the next step be to approach the students about the issue and implement education strategies about the risks involved with drug use?"


    By far the most sensible thing written in this article, and it came from a Yr 12 student. Mandatory reporting of drug dealing is just going to lead to more, otherwise promising teenagers being given criminal records and having their lives ruined before they had even started.
     

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    #5
    Bluelight Crew hoptis's Avatar
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    School quizzed on drug deal
    Jane Metlikovec
    June 06, 2007 04:16pm

    POLICE have interviewed Scotch College management more than one week after a senior student allegedly sold drugs to a year 9 boy.

    Detectives, who were only contacted by the prestigous college yesterday after an exclusive Herald Sun Online report, spent three hours at the prestigious school from 11am today.

    Police said the incident happened on Tuesday last week, and the school were informed the next day.

    The school is still refusing to answer calls from the Herald Sun Online, with a media statement they apparently prepared yesterday still not issued.

    Police have demanded private schools be forced to report drug deals after Scotch College failed to tell them it had expelled a young ecstasy pusher last week.

    Deputy Commissioner Simon Overland has called for private schools to be pulled into line with state schools, which are required by government protocol to tell police of drug-related incidents.

    "I think it's a difficult issue for schools to deal with, drug use in schools," Mr Overland said.

    * Vote now: Drug dealers

    "But if there's criminal behaviour involved, they really do need to involve the police and the earlier they do that, the better."

    But the Bracks Government said yesterday it would not introduce laws demanding mandatory reporting across the board.

    Elite schools have come under intense scrutiny this year for hiding on-campus drug scandals.

    Xavier College came under fire in April for failing to tell police it had expelled a year 11 student for selling marijuana in the school yard in February.

    Mr Overland said police were determined to ensure private school students faced the same consequences as state school students.

    A Scotch College year 12 student was expelled last week after he allegedly sold two ecstasy pills to a year 9 boy, who took them at school and fell into a drug haze.

    Year 12 students outside Scotch College said the year 9 student had been threatened with expulsion if he publicly named the boy who sold him the drugs.

    The senior students said the year 9 boy, who is believed to be back at school, was stupid for taking them.

    "He is an idiot. He shouldn't have done it," one said.

    A friend of the expelled student said he was upset at the way the school had handled the matter.

    "You can 'ask' students to leave but does that fix the problem at the school or with the accused student?" he said.

    "There is no way you can eliminate drugs in school, so wouldn't the next step be to approach the students about the issue and implement education strategies about the risks involved with drug use?

    "The school needs to take action, whether it may tarnish its reputation or not."

    Scotch College management, had repeatedly refused to answer calls from the Herald Sun Online on the issue.

    Education Minister John Lenders said in Parliament yesterday the State Government would not pass laws to dictate how non-government schools dealt with drug use among students.

    "This Government sees as totally unacceptable illegal drugs use in schools . . . and we will work with the non-government schools for policies and best practices which will stamp them out," Mr Lenders said.

    But Opposition education spokesman Philip Davis said that was not good enough.

    "Schools must have an obligation to report, as it's clear otherwise they won't because they don't want to damage their reputations," Mr Davis said.

    Another private school yesterday admitted a student had been expelled and another suspended over a sex scandal.

    Overnewton College principal Jim Laussen said a year 10 boy had been expelled from the Keilor school for filming a female student as she performed sexual acts on him in the school toilets last week.

    The female student has been suspended, and the school helped the boy's family find him a place at another school, Mr Laussen said.
    Herald Sun
     

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    Bluelight Crew lil angel15's Avatar
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    College boy faces drug charges for school dealing
    By Jane Metlikovec
    June 07, 2007 07:19am

    POLICE have interviewed the principal of Scotch College and are preparing to charge a student for selling ecstasy on school grounds.

    Detectives visited the elite Hawthorn college yesterday, more than a week after school management was informed of the on-campus drug dealing.

    The school contacted police only on Tuesday after an exclusive report by the Herald Sun online.

    Scotch College again avoided the Herald Sun yesterday, declining to comment for the third day in a row.

    The school's handling of the drug scandal has sparked political debate and prompted police Deputy Commissioner Simon Overland to demand that private schools be forced to report drug-related incidents to police - as is required of state schools.

    Education Minister John Lenders said in Parliament yesterday he would not introduce mandatory reporting laws for private schools.

    Detectives from the Boroondara crime investigation unit spent three hours interviewing Scotch management, including principal Dr Gordon Donaldson, from 11am yesterday.

    Victoria Police spokeswoman Cassandra Stone confirmed a year 9 student had taken two ecstasy pills at school on Tuesday, May 29.

    It is alleged a year 12 boy had sold the drugs to him earlier that day.

    During their police interview yesterday, the school told investigators the boy had left school and returned home in a drug haze.

    His mother contacted Scotch the next day.

    Sen-Constable Stone said police expected to charge the year 12 student for trafficking a drug of dependence in coming days.

    Investigators will also interview the year 9 student.

    Sen-Constable Stone said the school had not expelled the year 12 boy, despite fellow students believing this was the case.

    "Once the boy's parents found out they took him out of the school themselves," Sen-Constable Stone said.

    Sen-Det Marco Callegaro interviewed school management yesterday.

    The Boroondara CIU detective said he was pleased with the way the school had handled the situation.

    "I am more than satisfied with the process that the school has followed to report this matter to police," he said.
    Adelaide now
     

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    #7
    Bluelighter jude101's Avatar
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    The student had sold two ecstasy pills to a year-nine boy who took them during school and fell into a drug haze.
    a drug haze eh!

    ffs, 9 years old . .
     

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    #8
    Bluelighter AcidRain's Avatar
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    ffs, 9 years old . .
    No, he was in YEAR 9 of school, so would've been 13 - 15

    Cant believe he double dropped at school! Nutter!
     

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    #9
    Bluelighter jude101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AcidRain
    No, he was in YEAR 9 of school, so would've been 13 - 15

    Cant believe he double dropped at school! Nutter!
    Ah missed that!

    Im in a bit of a drug haze you see; )
     

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    #10
    Bluelighter hyroller's Avatar
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    yeah, doing it at school is pretty fu(ked up
     

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    #11
    yeah... I remember double dropping when I worked for the bank. I knew it was time to calm down when I kept telling my manage how pretty he looked with his lovely olive Complexion
     

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    #12
    Bluelighter ilikeacid's Avatar
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    Wow, Scotch kids are nuts. I ate hash cake at school a few times and that tripped me out enough. Pills at school is insanity.
     

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    #13
    Just kids being kids hopefully the expelled student will go to another school complete his studies and peruse the carrier he wishes and hopefully his parents will wake up and realize that private schools are just money hungry business which will not affect a child future one bit. Well that’s what I think. Private school are a waste of money with nothing to be gained.

    I got expelled from a private school in year 11 went to a state school got into uni, did my masters doing my phd and I am currently working as a lecture in a uni I do not see any positive impact of sending kids to a top private schools . Sure their is more chances of getting into a good uni. But being a lecture at a top university the kids which fail at uni and are forced out are mainly from top private schools
     

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    #14
    As long as I had sunglasses i'd be cool..
     

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    #15
    Bluelighter AcidRain's Avatar
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    Id have been rollling around on the carpet moaning, not to mention a blithering stuttering shakey mess
     

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    #16
    No matter what type of school you attend, public or private, there are always going to be problems with drugs. I don't see why it should become a public versus private matter it really annoys me when people make generalisations about students that attend either school.
    If people want to spend more money on education than others than so be it, its the money they can do what they want with it.

    On another note I can't believe that kid in year 9 took two pills at school! God damn no wonder he was in a drug haze!
     

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    #17
    Quote Originally Posted by finchy_87
    No matter what type of school you attend, public or private, there are always going to be problems with drugs. I don't see why it should become a public versus private matter it really annoys me when people make generalisations about students that attend either school.
    If people want to spend more money on education than others than so be it, its the money they can do what they want with it.

    On another note I can't believe that kid in year 9 took two pills at school! God damn no wonder he was in a drug haze!
    well I agree with you how can a year 9 kid take 2 pills at school.

    but back to the private school issue I would belive that is the year 12 kid did that in a public school he would proble not get expelled. well in my school he would not. and this is june his high schooling finishes in 5 months . if he goes to another school I'm not sure if it will affect his chances of getting into uni. but if it did then its a year wasted

    but you are right peoiple can do what ever they want with their money. I sure would not want to wast it on something I feel is just rubbish so people can say " I go to one of the best schools in town" and not do any better of than some kid that went to a state school.
     

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    #18
    Bluelight Crew lil angel15's Avatar
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    Another elite school feels sting
    Paul Anderson
    June 09, 2007 12:00am

    ANOTHER top Melbourne private school is embroiled in scandal after at least three students admitted possessing a drug of dependence.

    Four Marcellin College students are on suspension, three for possession of marijuana and the fourth for links to the drug.

    School authorities swiftly dealt with the four after a member of the public saw three of them -- all year 9 students -- with marijuana and smoking it in a Heidelberg side street last week.

    The fourth student, who is in year 10, was implicated later.

    Marcellin principal Mark Merry yesterday said the matter was dealt with as a high priority for the welfare of the pupils involved, and because they were in school uniform.

    Detectives from Heidelberg CIU have investigated the boys' actions.

    A police spokesman yesterday said the students had been cautioned and no criminal charges were expected to be laid.

    Marcellin is a Catholic college in Bulleen with about 1000 students. Its Latin motto translates as "Strive for the highest".

    In a statement to the Herald Sun, Mr Merry said: "I can confirm that we received information on Thursday, May 31, from a member of the public that three year 9 boys were in possession of a small quantity of marijuana in a side street off Burgundy St, Heidelberg, after school hours.

    "The boys were subsequently identified and admitted to smoking a cigarette containing marijuana.

    "Another student in year 10 was also found to be implicated.

    "In accordance with our school policy the matter was reported to the police and the Catholic Education Office in Melbourne.

    "All four boys were suspended pending a police investigation.

    "The boys concerned have been cautioned by police and they and their families will attend interviews with myself early next week to discuss further disciplinary measures and drug counselling."

    In April, Xavier College was slammed for not telling police it had expelled a year 11 pupil for selling marijuana to three others at the school in February.
    Herald Sun

    It seems like these boys were just trying to live up to the school motto. "Strive for the highest".
     

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    #19
    lol.. everyone knows there's drugs in every high school, private or not...... you're just more likely to be ripped off with parsely leaves or nurofens in a poor public school ;-)
     

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    #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Splatt
    you're just more likely to be ripped off with parsely leaves or nurofens in a poor public school ;-)
    Never thought about ripping people off with parsley leaves thats a heaps funny one - I wonder if people have ever fell for that one??
     

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    #21
    wow I cant beleave he was stupid enough to sell 2 pills to a yr9 student at school

    I mean didnt it seem obvious the kid would probly drop them at school as all kids trying to show off to there mates do
     

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    #22
    Bluelight Crew hoptis's Avatar
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    Report all drug crime
    Mary Papadakis
    June 10, 2007 12:00am

    PRIVATE schools that conceal crimes to protect their reputations could be charged by police following the Scotch College drugs scandal.

    Detective Senior-Sergeant Daryl Cullen, of Boroondara police, called on elite schools to report crimes involving students to police immediately or risk being prosecuted.

    The warning comes as schools have revealed students are "coming down" in the classroom on Mondays after weekend drug and alcohol binges.

    Teachers are being confronted by students as young as Year 7 battling alcoholic hangovers, marijuana "bong-overs" and the hazy aftermath of designer party drugs.

    Adolescent psychologist Dr Michael Carr-Gregg said many teenagers turned up to school sleep deprived and spaced out.

    "There's no question Saturdays and Sundays are party days," he said.

    Det Sen-Sgt Cullen said while private schools were not legally required to report drug-related incidents to police, they could be breaching section 326 of the Crimes Act if they hid incidents for a "benefit."

    He plans to seek legal advice on the section.

    "(The benefit) may be a school trying to protect its image and financial income stream," he said.

    "You don't spend $20,000 (in fees) to send your kid to a drug haven."

    But Det Sen-Sgt Cullen said police were satisfied Scotch had acted appropriately despite a week-long delay in reporting a drug incident to police.

    A Year 12 student allegedly sold a Year 9 student two ecstasy pills which he took while at school.

    Xavier College came under fire in April for failing to tell police it had expelled a Year 11 student for selling marijuana at school.

    Sen Det-Sgt Cullen said elite schools had a duty to report incidents to ensure students realised they were not above the law.
    Sunday Herald Sun
     

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    #23
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    Scot-free on drugs
    Mary Papadakis
    June 17, 2007 12:00am

    A SCOTCH College student at the centre of a drugs scandal will not be charged by police.

    The year 12 student was released with a caution by police after being interviewed by Boroondara officers on Thursday night.

    The teenager lashed out when approached by the Sunday Herald Sun for comment after leaving the police station, verbally and physically threatening a journalist and photographer, who was chased along Harp Rd in Kew.

    A male with the teenager, believed to be his father, was unable to restrain him and police had to intervene.

    The teenager's family refused to comment when contacted several times by the Sunday Herald Sun this week.

    Scotch College has also refused to comment on the incident involving the sale of drugs to a year 9 student at the elite Hawthorn school about three weeks ago.

    Boroondara Criminal Investigation Unit's Det Sen-Sgt Daryl Cullen this week said the teenager had been released with a caution.

    Det Sen-Sgt Cullen said that, while drugs offences were of a serious nature, young people made mistakes and police had options including diversionary programs and cautions available to them to use when appropriate.

    "We won't be pursuing this any further," he said.

    "In this case, this (a caution) is the most appropriate manner of dealing with it.

    "The main concern is for the welfare of the victim and offender and to ensure the problem is eradicated in all schools."

    Det Sen-Sgt Cullen said the teenager had been truthful and co-operative with police.

    He said while it had been widely reported that ecstasy was the drug involved in the scandal, police were not sure of the type of drug as it had been consumed, destroying any evidence.

    Private schools are not legally obliged to report drug-related incidents to police, unlike government schools.

    But Det Sen-Sgt Cullen said it was in the best interests of private schools to have police deal with any crime and set a good example for students.
    Herald Sun
     

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    #24
    Bluelight Crew PsiloSubNaut's Avatar
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    We had problem's with shrooms growing on our oval in high school, heaps of students (mainly males yr 9-12) were taking them and tripping out in class.

    The school knew but just ignored the entire thing..

    Same with kids getting busted for selling thier meds and street drugs at school, it rarely got past the teachers and students involved but can you blame them?

    Who really wants cops and the media prying into thier schools about something they can't control anyway?
     

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    #25
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    I know this doesn't get said much on this site, but you have to prasie the police for their level headed response to this particular case. A formal caution is, in my opinion, the best response.
    The Herald Sun should be ashamed of itself for intervening in the internal issues of schools and making minors subject to the attention of the criminal justice system. A criminal record would have fucked this kids life up.
     

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