Bluelight

Thread: is suboxone an opiate?

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. Collapse Details
    is suboxone an opiate? 
    #1
    Just wondering,is soboxone an opiate? And if so,what narcotic is in it? Thanks
     

  2. Collapse Details
     
    #2
    Bluelight Crew Swerlz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    FUCK YOU.. THATS WHERE
    Posts
    11,293
     

  3. Collapse Details
     
    #3
    Bluelight Crew Jamshyd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Not on a train, sadly.
    Posts
    16,066
    ^ No, actually it is an Opiate (not just an opioid) because it is made from thebaine (opium-derrivative) and retains the basic morphinan structure.
     

  4. Collapse Details
     
    #4
    Bluelighter Survival0200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Lonely place in silence
    Posts
    3,160
    How about naloxone? Should you call naloxone and opiate/opioid? And how about naltrexone?

    They're both opiate antagonists, but I haven't heard anyone calling them just plain 'opiates' or 'opioids'.
     

  5. Collapse Details
     
    #5
    Bluelight Crew Swerlz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    FUCK YOU.. THATS WHERE
    Posts
    11,293
    thats why i said semi-synthetic.. and post the erowid page on it
     

  6. Collapse Details
     
    #6
    Bluelight Crew Jamshyd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Not on a train, sadly.
    Posts
    16,066
    Naloxone and Naltrexone are both Opiates. They both retain structures that are found in opium, thus they are opiate. This means that naloxone and even thebaine are opiates.

    An Opioid is something that does something to opioid receptors but bears no relation to opium. That is why it is an opioide. This means that anything from Meperidine to fentanyl to Salvinorin-A are opioids.

    It is not a matter of pharmacology - it is a matter of grammar, actually.

    More examples:

    Humans and apes are different but they share a common ancestor - therefore they are primates.

    Goblins have human features but aren't related to humans, therefore they are humanoids
     

  7. Collapse Details
     
    #7
    Bluelighter Astavats's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Glendale, California
    Posts
    1,499
    ^It took me a second to get the last examples lol, that's clever.

    Is there anywhere, with a list of "Opiates" and a list of "Opioids"? Would be helpful, as I am constantly misusing the terms.
     

  8. Collapse Details
     
    #8
    Bluelight Crew Jamshyd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Not on a train, sadly.
    Posts
    16,066
    ^ Unfortunately there isn't to my knowledge, since most scientists are horrible at language and use the terms interchangeably

    Another way to put it is: Every opiate is an opioid, but not every opioid is an opiate.
     

  9. Collapse Details
     
    #9
    i learned something! awsome!

    i too had been misusing the term.

    thanks!
     

  10. Collapse Details
     
    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Survival0200
    How about naloxone? Should you call naloxone and opiate/opioid? And how about naltrexone?

    They're both opiate antagonists, but I haven't heard anyone calling them just plain 'opiates' or 'opioids'.
    On that subject, Loperamide is an opioid receptor agonist, lol, then again its the active ingredient in Immodium. There are a lot of substances out there that can affect the opioid receptors but play a role mainly on the receptor group they are specialized agonists for while not being centrally acting on the CNS.
     

  11. Collapse Details
     
    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by DarkCode
    On that subject, Loperamide is an opioid receptor agonist, lol, then again its the active ingredient in Immodium. There are a lot of substances out there that can affect the opioid receptors but play a role mainly on the receptor group they are specialized agonists for while not being centrally acting on the CNS.
    It is a mu-antagonist in the intestines/pns. It just doesnt cross the BBB
     

  12. Collapse Details
     
    #12
    Quote Originally Posted by DarkCode
    On that subject, Loperamide is an opioid receptor agonist, lol, then again its the active ingredient in Immodium. There are a lot of substances out there that can affect the opioid receptors but play a role mainly on the receptor group they are specialized agonists for while not being centrally acting on the CNS.


    If you remove that chlorine (NaBH4) it becomes more more centerally active. I strongly suspect that making a propenyl ester from that -OH that it would make a mild analgesic, but nothing amazing.
     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •