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GoingUpGoingDown
13-01-2010, 16:19
Does anyone have any experience with this? I have just moved to a city that is pretty high compared to the norm, about 8,000ft/3,000mtrs I believe. When I smoke (and even when I don't), I experience a shortness of breath. Last time I smoked it got so bad that it got kind of hard for me to breath, felt like I was having a panic attack or something. I have also been here for a week so my body should be adjusted to the altitude, but when I smoke, it is like my lungs are saying fuck you (I don't smoke cigarettes). Any advice? Thanks guys.

Zios
13-01-2010, 16:23
welcome to bluelight :D
About the shortness of breath it maybe cuz of the altitude+high combo that gets you f*cked up.
i dunno :(

Sega420
13-01-2010, 16:33
nice username. what city would this be? (no details or streetnames duh)

ie are you in the Andes, or are you just in like the mountains around Denver, CO type thing :P

just how high is the altitude you're at.
sorry, im not good with altitude/lat/long.

Eldaren
13-01-2010, 16:56
Does anyone have any experience with this? I have just moved to a city that is pretty high compared to the norm, about 8,000ft/3,000mtrs I believe. When I smoke (and even when I don't), I experience a shortness of breath. Last time I smoked it got so bad that it got kind of hard for me to breath, felt like I was having a panic attack or something. I have also been here for a week so my body should be adjusted to the altitude, but when I smoke, it is like my lungs are saying fuck you (I don't smoke cigarettes). Any advice? Thanks guys.

scientific evidence that you should be well adjusted to the altitude?

3000 metres is pretty high, the air pressure is definitely significantly lower. one week is not very long. if it only took a week to be completely adjusted i doubt athletes would bother with high altitude training.

Dandiwer
13-01-2010, 17:32
nice username. what city would this be? (no details or streetnames duh)

ie are you in the Andes, or are you just in like the mountains around Denver, CO type thing :P

just how high is the altitude you're at.
sorry, im not good with altitude/lat/long.

The OP said about 8,000 ft. Denver is 5280.
However though being 5,280 ft about sea level I have never had any experiences while smoking and experiencing a shortness of breath. I think you just need to give your body time to adjust to the changes.

Sega420
13-01-2010, 17:35
" im not good with altitude/lat/long" being the main bit


i dont know distance lest it be on the land

Dandiwer
13-01-2010, 17:40
My bad, I wouldn't have expected most to know how high CO is above sea level. Just threw the number in there for reference.

Kadazzle
13-01-2010, 17:41
You just have to get adjusted to the altitude. Just like when people go and climb large mountains, they have to adjust so they don't die as soon as they go too high.

Give it time.

Eldaren
13-01-2010, 17:50
The OP said about 8,000 ft. Denver is 5280.
However though being 5,280 ft about sea level I have never had any experiences while smoking and experiencing a shortness of breath. I think you just need to give your body time to adjust to the changes.

Altitude and its effects are relative, depending on how adjusted you are to those conditions. There's an insurmountable difference between moving to a place thats 8000 feet higher than where you used to live at a mature age, compared to living in a place thats 8000 feet above sea level for your whole life.

If you're born there, grow up there, live there forever, and are totally used to it, of course you aren't going to notice. You have nothing else to compare it to, you just get used to it. The longer you've lived somewhere with an extremely different altitude, the worse your ability to just "get used to it".

Dandiwer
13-01-2010, 17:52
How do athletes train and get ready for events in higher altitudes?

Sega420
13-01-2010, 18:05
its a coincidence how you happened to be from Denver though...

but yes, im curious also, what kind of training would they do?

Dandiwer
13-01-2010, 18:31
its a coincidence how you happened to be from Denver though...

but yes, im curious also, what kind of training would they do?

I know right lol, it's a cool city. Every time I have left it I always do end up missing it. Hmm, you know I started looking into that question after I posted it and what it looks like is they train in this Hyperbaric Chamber, and by train I mean work out.

I guess that is supposed to help you get used to the altitude.

Sega420
13-01-2010, 19:03
like when divers get the bends?

Dandiwer
13-01-2010, 23:10
Not sure I get what you mean?

w01fg4ng
13-01-2010, 23:23
I know right lol, it's a cool city. Every time I have left it I always do end up missing it. Hmm, you know I started looking into that question after I posted it and what it looks like is they train in this Hyperbaric Chamber, and by train I mean work out.

I guess that is supposed to help you get used to the altitude.
I feel I am qualified to answer this one pretty well.

1. Hyperbaric Chambers are only used in emergency situations. Such as having extreme altitude sickness at above 19,000 ft/ 5,000 mtrs.

2. People may go to Denver (yes, it is an great city) to run in a marathon or something. People go to the mountains to hike, ski, ect.. The reason it's training, is because it's harder to breathe at higher altitudes, which in turn strengthens your lung power.

Heres WHY:

The higher the altitude, the more pressure there is. The oxygen levels are actually the same, but the pressure causes the lungs to absorb less oxygen.


As for cannabis, I have not noticed any difference smoking at 14, 000 ft versus smoking at sea level.

However, drinking alcohol is very different. It takes A LOT more to get me drunk at sea level than it does at higher altitudes.


OP if you just moved, wait a couple weeks to acclimate. It's normal if you are feeling tired, headaches, things like that for a little while....that's just the altitude.

Chainer
14-01-2010, 00:17
Wolf beat me to the punch. A couple weeks and any athlete should adjust.

Sega420
14-01-2010, 03:39
and hey, when you smoke with your buddies from the other towns, you'll have better lung power!

Newbierock
14-01-2010, 05:28
Wait, what if you spend a good amount of time toking up at mega high altitudes. Then go down to some mainland and toke with some low altitude folk? would you put them under the table?

Eldaren
14-01-2010, 05:32
Wait, what if you spend a good amount of time toking up at mega high altitudes. Then go down to some mainland and toke with some low altitude folk? would you put them under the table?

Nope. At high altitude your lung power would increase, but the amount of THC you'd be getting wouldn't increase. (ie: you wouldn't be ripping bigger cones up high, you'd initially start by ripping smaller ones, and work your way up to about the same size as you used to do, but to do that at high altitude requires much more lung power)

So when you descended again, your lungs would be super powered yes. But your THC tolerance would be the same or less, depending on how much you actually smoked up there.

Assuming you didn't smoke a shit ton more up on the mountain or whatever, we can assume your tolerance will be about the same.

So if you put it together, you have the same tolerance, but better lungs. This means you would, if anything, probably just be more effective at putting yourself under the table.

RecklessWOT
14-01-2010, 09:11
My bad, I wouldn't have expected most to know how high CO is above sea level.

Well it is the mile high city. And I have never smoked out there, but I'm from the east coast, and every time I go to Denver, or CO in general I notice a shortness in breath in general. When I go into the mountains especially I can barely breathe at all walking from the truck to the store...

TheFunk350
14-01-2010, 09:46
Drink on a plane. ;)

Newbierock
14-01-2010, 13:20
So if you put it together, you have the same tolerance, but better lungs. This means you would, if anything, probably just be more effective at putting yourself under the table.

^ I Like this phrase. :) I Was talking in terms of just bowl size/smoking ability not actual tolerance, but still you made me laugh. :D

hjj
15-01-2010, 00:25
thw only time I experienced shortness of breathe was from carbon minoxide poisoning while hotboxing in a car. (exaust leak ftw)

make sure you don't have an exhaust leak.

shienar
15-01-2010, 00:35
Hey i smoked in Leh which is somewhere around the 3.5 km mark. Not to bad i was young so i cant say that it was easy.

GoingUpGoingDown
15-01-2010, 16:41
My home city is 6 ft. (~2 meters) below sea level. I don't spent a lot of time in the mountains. Since I have arrived here, smoking weed definitely does something that throws me off. I have learned just to take a few puffs of some regular weed, anything more than that will get me VERY light headed, almost like a lack of oxygen.

Yes, I know science says my body should be acclimated, but then again at one point in time science said the world was flat :P But in all seriousness, I am a pretty active boxer also, and in areas with normal altitude I can spar a 3 minute round no problems, here, after 2 minutes I'm playing D.

I guess I can give this advice - if you travel somewhere that is excessively higher than the norm for you - play it safe unless you want to get really jacked up, but not in a good way. In regards to alcohol, I haven't noticed much. I don't drink that much, but I did drink a small (maybe 250 or 300 ml) bottle of some sugarcane liqour, and the effects were about the same.

Thanks for the advice guys!

carl
15-01-2010, 17:08
I feel I am qualified to answer this one pretty well.

1. Hyperbaric Chambers are only used in emergency situations. Such as having extreme altitude sickness at above 19,000 ft/ 5,000 mtrs.

2. People may go to Denver (yes, it is an great city) to run in a marathon or something. People go to the mountains to hike, ski, ect.. The reason it's training, is because it's harder to breathe at higher altitudes, which in turn strengthens your lung power.

Heres WHY:

The higher the altitude, the more pressure there is. The oxygen levels are actually the same, but the pressure causes the lungs to absorb less oxygen.


As for cannabis, I have not noticed any difference smoking at 14, 000 ft versus smoking at sea level.

However, drinking alcohol is very different. It takes A LOT more to get me drunk at sea level than it does at higher altitudes.


OP if you just moved, wait a couple weeks to acclimate. It's normal if you are feeling tired, headaches, things like that for a little while....that's just the altitude.
while this tread is pretty much over, you're confused as to how atmospheric pressure works and what responses our bodies have to altered atmospheric pressures.

1. Hyperbaric chambers aren't only used in emergencies, and they aren't used for altitude sickness. Emergency medical care for extreme altitude sickness is to descend. There are no hyperbaric chambers in field use for altitude sickness, anywhere in the world.

2. Lung power is not increased at all. It's not harder to breath, it's actually easier to breather the air, if we are only looking at the physical aspect of respiration. The reason we feel short of breath has to do with your next stated misunderstanding, the air pressure. As we ascend through the atmosphere, pressure drops. This drop in pressure means that with each breath, we inhale fewer molecules of O2 than we would have at sea level, or wherever (altitude) our body is acclimated to. Our bodies will adjust to this, creating more red blood cells in order to use more of the O2 that is inhaled.

It's really a very complicated process, and I've made it all sound very simple, but it's representative of the processes and physics.

I know you were trying to help by posting this, but really, if you don't know what you're talking about... stop. or do your research before posting. you've got it all wrong.

w01fg4ng
15-01-2010, 21:05
1. There are no hyperbaric chambers in field use for altitude sickness, anywhere in the world.
That's funny, I just saw some on top of Mt Kilimanjaro in Africa.




2. Lung power is not increased at all.
The strength of your lung power increases whenever you work out. Are you an athlete at all?

The only point you have made in correcting me is that the pressure DROPS as altitude increases. All I meant to say is there is a change in pressure as the oxygen remains the same...it affects and effects your lungs regardless.


maybe you should try the smart game with someone else...

EDIT:

if you don't know what you're talking about... stop.
Take your own advice.

w01fg4ng
15-01-2010, 22:58
Hey Carl, I see you are in CO. Do you have your Med Card yet? Im in LODO. What are you doing hanging out in CD bro? Thought you would say hi to me huh?

carl
16-01-2010, 01:05
That's funny, I just saw some on top of Mt Kilimanjaro in Africa.

that's news to me, and I used to work in hyperbarics. It's not part of the protocol, as it's just much simpler to descend. The last time I was in Tanzania was nearly ten years ago, so I can't call bullshit... things may have changed. :/



The strength of your lung power increases whenever you work out. Are you an athlete at all?
No one has mentioned exercise. You're the first. I guess you are saying smoking is exercise... I'll let that fly. But the OP didn't ask about exercise.

Following this logic is incomplete though, it doesn't explain the increased capacity to carry O2 our body develops when at altitude. This develops due to a lower partial pressure of O2, and our body trying to make up for the reduced O2 content with each breath.

After examining what really happens, you didn't really add to anyone's understanding with either of your posts...



The only point you have made in correcting me is that the pressure DROPS as altitude increases. All I meant to say is there is a change in pressure as the oxygen remains the same...it affects and effects your lungs regardless.


maybe you should try the smart game with someone else...

EDIT:

Take your own advice.

Your bolded statement shows that you don't really have a thorough understanding of gas exchange in the lungs. While I am being over simplistic, I'm not making confusing or untrue statements.

What you mean to say there is "When there is a negative change in pressure, the Oxygen content, measured as a percentage of the whole, stays the same. The oxygen content in a given volume of gas will decrease. This is explained by Dalton's Law"

I'm done, this isn't a thread about gas exchange... per se.

carl
16-01-2010, 01:06
Hey Carl, I see you are in CO. Do you have your Med Card yet? Im in LODO. What are you doing hanging out in CD bro? Thought you would say hi to me huh?

Hey brotha... no offense or hard feeling in the above posts... :p
I live up in Windsor, and I have my card and a great dispensary :D

w01fg4ng
16-01-2010, 01:30
that's news to me, and I used to work in hyperbarics. It's not part of the protocol, as it's just much simpler to descend. The last time I was in Tanzania was nearly ten years ago, so I can't call bullshit... things may have changed. :/

Again, I said it was used as an emergency, NOT standard protocol. Also oxygen tanks aren't standard protocol on Kili, but those are there too. To correct you, you did call bullshit.



No one has mentioned exercise. You're the first.
A lot people mentioned the term "training" ITT and I helped describe what "training" at high altitudes actually means.



After examining what really happens, you didn't really add to anyone's understanding with either of your posts...

I answered the OP's question, being the only one who can claim to know what it is like to smoke at high altitudes as well as sea level.

I also answered questions about Hyperbaric Chambers and behaviors in changes in altitude.

What did you do? Oh that's right, you're done with this conversation.

oogie
19-01-2010, 08:54
I moved from sea level to 9,000 feet 3 years ago, and it took about a month to lose that out of breath feeling. Everytime I toked, I was completely out of breath. Drink LOTS of water, and that will help alot. The best part is: after about a year, if you go back to sealevel, You can party like a rockstar, and you never seem to get tired!!!

the.day.tripper
01-02-2010, 05:50
I moved to leadville CO from sea level and smoking out here was essentially the same, at least i didnt notice a difference. Drinking on the other hand was completly different, i became drunk much faster at 10,200.

trainwreckmolly
01-02-2010, 07:35
i live at sea level but i have smoked around 12000ft before. i didnt notice a difference. alcohol, on the other hand is a whole nother story...

b4rd
04-02-2010, 10:13
This is quite obvious.. cmon you should know what happens at higher altitudes...